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Old 07-30-2022, 03:09 PM   #1
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Tires for 3011 DS Forester Class C

Time to replace the tires on my 2018 Forester, looking for what others have done. Considering moving up to a 121 load index but the available tires are very limited in this range. Just curious what others on this forum think and have replaced their OEM tires with. Tire size is 225/75R16 and OEM tires are Hankook Dyna Pro HT. Have had no issue with them and they still look like new but their 5 year birthday just passed about a week ago.
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Old 07-30-2022, 05:00 PM   #2
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I also have the Hankooks and they are working well. When replacement time comes I will probably buy them if their price is reasonable and competitive. I will do it at around 12 years age, not 5. My last class C’s tires ran to 15 years age, no problems. I store the unit indoors, out of sunlight.
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Old 07-30-2022, 07:01 PM   #3
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I also have the Hankooks and they are working well. When replacement time comes I will probably buy them if their price is reasonable and competitive. I will do it at around 12 years age, not 5. My last class Cís tires ran to 15 years age, no problems. I store the unit indoors, out of sunlight.
I kind of agree with you on this on age of tires. We store our Class C inside, I run a dehumidifier all summer in the building so humidity stays 45 to 50% and About 80deg F. In the Winter it rarely gets below 40deg F. Our tires are 6years old with 14k miles. I'm sure we will be schooled on why we should age them out now.
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Old 08-02-2022, 09:10 AM   #4
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Tires 3011DS 2018

I have replaced my OEM Hankook tires at a bit less than 5 years but for reasons other than wear. I have lost two tires from a road hazard that would probably have taken out any brand tire. I replaced with Hankooks mainly for the price. I had no problem with them, were quiet enough, I put approx 5000 miles a year on the rig and I will probably trade in in two years.
I check tire pressure often and almost never need to add any.
I also do something that I've not seen or heard of very much, I store the rig in covered storage and I lower the leveling pads to take the pressure off the side walls of the tires. Every rig (3 others) I've owned would start out a trip after a lengthy storage and I could feel the tires not running smooth. I was told that they take a set after not moving for a while. I also spray "Tire Shine" on them several times a year to protect from U.V.
My $.02
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Old 08-02-2022, 10:18 AM   #5
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Increasing tire size in a motor vehicle seldom has any benefit (trailers are different) as the OEM tires are normally capable of supporting much more than the GVWR. Motor vehicle tires are oversized so they can run soft tire pressures for a compliant and comfortable ride for the passengers.

Compare the GVWR of your vehicle to the weight the tires can support. Example in my driveway (not a motor home) has a GVWR of 7500 pounds. Tire capacity is 2756 pounds times 4 or 11,024 pounds over 3500 pounds more tire capacity than the vehicle. If the difference was smaller and I was pushing the GVWR I might consider the next bigger tire size but not now.

YMMV.

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Old 08-05-2022, 03:55 PM   #6
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Weigh your motor home when loaded for travel.


I purchased the C (Commercial) version because my 2861DS rear axle runs at the max axle rating of 9600 lbs loaded for travel. The load range E max is 9880 lbs at 80 psi, while the C version is 11900 lbs at 80 psi. The C version gives me much more margin especially since I know the axle weight is not balanced side to side, the left is more than half and likely exceeds the load range E max.

The other advantage is that I can run the tires at lower pressure for my axle weights, instead of 80 rear/75 front, I now run 70 rear/65 front. I feel that it softens the feel of the road very slightly.
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Old 08-05-2022, 04:27 PM   #7
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Have a friend with a similar rig. He went with Continentals with a load rating higher than the OEM tires
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Old 08-05-2022, 04:59 PM   #8
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I had them Dyna Pros on my tow vehicle... had great grip in the wet
especially on a somewhat slippery boat ramp.



I liked them but wife disposed of them at a red light....

well technically.... the other driver disposed of them when they ran the red light and pushed my Tahoe over 8 foot sideways.




I have never replaced a tire just because of it's age
If it shows age related cracking then would replace...
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Old 08-05-2022, 06:30 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by BehindBars View Post
I also have the Hankooks and they are working well. When replacement time comes I will probably buy them if their price is reasonable and competitive. I will do it at around 12 years age, not 5. My last class Cís tires ran to 15 years age, no problems. I store the unit indoors, out of sunlight.


That is a BIG gamble. Tires age out. I run mine no more than six years. One blow out could cause enough damage to pay for an entire set of tires, not to mention the potential for injuries.
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Old 08-05-2022, 06:33 PM   #10
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That is a BIG gamble. Tires age out. I run mine no more than six years. One blow out could cause enough damage to pay for an entire set of tires, not to mention the potential for injuries.

I replaced the tires on my 2015 Forester in 2019 with Coopers. They rode just as nicely as the Michelins, but at much lower cost, and hopefully wonít exhibit the sidewall cracking of the Michelins.
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Old 08-05-2022, 08:52 PM   #11
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That is a BIG gamble. Tires age out. I run mine no more than six years. One blow out could cause enough damage to pay for an entire set of tires, not to mention the potential for injuries.
I go with what I learn from my own experiences, and what I observe inspecting my own equipment, rather than a fixed time interval, or what random people tell me “COULD” happen. I have closely monitored and kept tires up to as much as 15 years age and slept well at night.

I think I have about 70 pneumatic tires around the house, 48 of them are on highway capable vehicles/trailers. I manage them by tire conditions and age, and change almost all of the tires myself when I deem the time has come.

If anyone wants to change their tires at 5 years or 6 years, or whatever number years they came up with, I say let ‘em go for it, but it’s not generally how I operate.
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Old 08-07-2022, 12:11 PM   #12
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I wouldn't necessarily jump on getting new tires purely based on 5 years of age.

Have your tires inspected annually at 5 or 6 years of age to see if replacement is warranted.

My Cooper Discovery HT3s were new in 2016 and given a clean bill of health.

A tpms, TireMinder, etc, and putting on metal valve stems are somethings to consider investing in now. Put sensors on your toad too so you can monitor them all in one place.

You are more likely now to crack a 5 yo rubber valve stem than have a blow out and new tires won't prevent a road hazard encounter and damage.

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