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Old 06-06-2013, 12:41 PM   #1
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Fishing Waders...

I've set my TT up at a campground in an area of Western NC with some fine trout fishing streams. There are several very good fly fisherman in the campground and they've offered to try to "show me the ropes."

Over the years I've accumulated the tackle and have done a little fly fishing but it was mostly popping bugs in farm ponds for brim and bass.

One thing I haven't got is a set of waders...My new fishing buddies have suggested I get some. They all wear hip waders of some sort. Some with boots attached and others with stocking feet....I don't want to get too heavily invested until I'm sure this is something I'm going to be sure I'm going to "take to it."

I'm leaning towards stocking feet with a separate wading boot.

I'd sure appreciate some advice on some modestly priced attire. I'd prefer to keep it around $100 -/+ (if possible) in case they wind up in the closet with all the other hobbies I've begun and left behind.

Thanks, hud
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:09 PM   #2
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My personal feelings is that I have better footing with separate wading boots and stocking feet. But I haven't fished in 10 years and wouldn't now do it enough to justify the cost of the two. I'd likely get a pair waders with built in feet.

I would spend the money on breathable waders.
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:26 PM   #3
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I agree with ependydad. Especially about the breathable fabric.

I prefer separate waders and boots because they are just more comfortable for me.

Having said that, good hip waders made from a breathable fabric with separate boots are over $100. You can find rubber hip waders with a built in boot more easily and cheaper at your local Walmart if you just want to try it out.
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:30 PM   #4
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I'd also definitely go with hip boots vs. chest waders.
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Old 06-06-2013, 02:18 PM   #5
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Do a search on Cabela's, theres full length 3.5mm neoprene waders for $100.
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Old 06-06-2013, 09:55 PM   #6
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Go with breathable waders. Check out waist waders instead of hip waders. What ever you do try them on before buying. Unless your feet are the exact size of the boot foot waders you can get a better fit with stocking foot and wading boots.

Do NOT, I repeat, do NOT, get a pair of felt soled boots. States are starting to outlaw them as they can transport nasty organisms that screw up streams.
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Old 06-07-2013, 07:53 AM   #7
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Lots of good advice. Thank-you all.

The issue with cross contamination of the streams with felt soles is very interesting. I'd heard there was a chance that felt soles might be outlawed...I guess that's why there are so many boots with felt bottoms on eBay now.

I do need to get somewhere that I can try some waders on before I buy. I live in a very rural area and as far as I can tell, there's not one single pair of waders for sale in this county....looks like a road trip!

Thanks again, we'll continue looking.

hud
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Old 06-07-2013, 08:06 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Hudlow View Post
Lots of good advice. Thank-you all.

The issue with cross contamination of the streams with felt soles is very interesting. I'd heard there was a chance that felt soles might be outlawed...I guess that's why there are so many boots with felt bottoms on eBay now.

I do need to get somewhere that I can try some waders on before I buy. I live in a very rural area and as far as I can tell, there's not one single pair of waders for sale in this county....looks like a road trip!

Thanks again, we'll continue looking.

hud
Iam an avid fly guy. Here in Colorado, felt bottoms are a HUGE NO! It is because of cross contamination of an aggressive mussel and other parasites that can infiltrate the dish and wipeout an entire species.
Costco, Cabellas, Bass Pro all have good selections do wader combos. Definitely prefer separate boot to wader for balance. You may be hard pressed to find them for-$100 as even a modest boot will run more. Check local fly shops, as they sometimes have waders on sale from their rental inventory. Good luck, and welcome to the challenging world of "real fishing"
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Old 06-07-2013, 02:14 PM   #9
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What are the alternatives to felt bottoms. I can remember trying to stand on slippery rocks in the old rubber bottom boots with very little success.
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Old 06-08-2013, 08:23 AM   #10
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What are the alternatives to felt bottoms. I can remember trying to stand on slippery rocks in the old rubber bottom boots with very little success.
Looking through all the ads for waders and boots, there seems to be new cleat patterns and "stickier" rubber these days for wading on slick rocks...of course it comes at a premium cost.

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Old 06-08-2013, 04:36 PM   #11
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Looking through all the ads for waders and boots, there seems to be new cleat patterns and "stickier" rubber these days for wading on slick rocks...of course it comes at a premium cost.

hud
HUD, you are correct, new materials make it much easier to navigate the slippery bottoms of some our fas moving rivers. I have a pair of Simms with cleated rubber soles love Em, but not cheap. ($250+). I am on the river two to three times a weekend never a problem.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:38 AM   #12
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I thought I would try some here on the bayou...I found out pretty quick not to use them in mud bottom bayous...they stick like glue and I could hardly get my foot to come loose...Ha..ha...ha...so I didn't go far, just on the edge..nope...not for bayous...live and learn!!
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Old 06-12-2013, 10:03 AM   #13
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I love my SIMMS breathables, with separate wading shoes. Very comfortable, no leaks (knock on wood!), and they dry quickly for storage 'til next time.
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Old 06-29-2013, 03:43 PM   #14
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Not to hi-jack the thread but why do you need a special shoe? Why not just use an old pair of tennis shoes or hiking boots? Thanks, John
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Old 06-29-2013, 05:13 PM   #15
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I just received a set of Frogg Togg waders and boots that I finally broke down and ordered.

I can see that the boots are made to drain easily. They are also built to protect the waders which can be a fairly expensive investment. I fished this last weekend in shorts and sandals and did OK.

I'd guess tennis shoes or hiking boots would work.
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