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Old 08-23-2011, 06:30 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by jjarrard View Post
Now the question is, how many amps does the 12 cubic foot fridge and converter draw? The trailer is cooling inside now. I am going to install the Dish network receiver. I am getting ready for our planned Labor Day trip next week! Thanks for the input!
read up a few post to my chart
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Old 08-23-2011, 06:52 PM   #22
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Also watch for anything running off that breaker in the house.
Check your tt's cord to see if it feels warm or hot. Check the prongs on your plug to see if they are turning black. Those are signs of low voltage.
Hope it all works out for you. Have fun on that Labor Day trip!
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Old 08-23-2011, 07:10 PM   #23
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I have a 100 amp service in my garage and have 4 - 30 amp rv outlets. You will be fine with a single 30 amp plug on a 200 amp service. MAKE sure you get a 110 3 prong RV outlet (bought all mine at Home Depot) a lot of people wire them 220 because the old dryer outlets are the same. If you wire it 220 it will fry your converter / charger Amazon.com: Leviton 7313 30 Amp, 125 Volt, NEMA Tt-30R, 2P, 3W, Flush Mounting Receptacle, Straight Blade, Industrial Grade, Grounding, For Recreational Vehicles, Side Wired, Steel Strap, Black: Home Improvement
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Old 08-23-2011, 07:24 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by grhodes50 View Post
Also watch for anything running off that breaker in the house.
Check your tt's cord to see if it feels warm or hot. Check the prongs on your plug to see if they are turning black. Those are signs of low voltage.
Hope it all works out for you. Have fun on that Labor Day trip!
this is true. i initially purchased a cheap plastic adapter to bump my 50A down to a standard 20A household plug.
it did seem to run my ac with no problems, but the adapter got fairly warm. it looked like this only it was black and cheaper looking lol. please note the plugs are wrong in the pics, but im just using them as an example






then i got a nice name brand adapter that looks like this, and my heat problem was eliminated
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Old 08-23-2011, 07:41 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by jjarrard View Post
Now the question is, how many amps does the 12 cubic foot fridge and converter draw? The trailer is cooling inside now. I am going to install the Dish network receiver. I am getting ready for our planned Labor Day trip next week! Thanks for the input!
The Dometic 12 CU FT fridge is model number NDR1292.

According to the attached Manual it draws 420 Watts of 120 VAC (2 210 Watt 60 Volt heaters in series) Page 17 That works out to 3.5 amps for the 12 CU FT heater. The AC line has a 5 Amp fuse in the AC input line.
The DC feed is fused at 3 Amps DC (or 36 Watts). If the converter is supplying the full 36 watts DC control power, it will add 0.3 amps AC to the AC load for a total of just under 4 amps.

Now the Converter draw (in AC) is totally dependent on the DC load on the converter. Charging a low battery; and lighting those incandescent bulbs; and running the stereo; yada yada; could consume the entire 55 amp (my converter) DC output of the converter. 55 amps DC times 12 volts = 660 watts = how many AC amps at 120 volts? = 5.5 amps VAC

So keep the DC load to a minimum and you should be able to run the AC; Fridge; radio/TV; and charge the battery while on a 20 Amp dedicated circuit. Just don't try the heaters and the microwave.

That help?
Attached Files
File Type: pdf DM2652 RV Fridge.pdf (3.79 MB, 33 views)
File Type: pdf DM2652 RV Fridge Parts List.pdf (366.8 KB, 29 views)
File Type: pdf DM 2652operation.pdf (193.7 KB, 35 views)
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Old 08-23-2011, 08:28 PM   #26
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It amazes me how many people will drop 10 -20K and up on an RV and not spend $100-$200 to make sure it gets the proper amount of power. They always talk to a bunch of friends who have done it for years with no problem but there are alot of variables. Cord length and gauge are important and to an extent is the conductors feeding the recep. Also, most home receptacles are rated 15 amps and are fed with 20 amps but most 20 amp breakers will hold 20 amps continuously. That generally winds up burning up the recep as well as whatever's plugged into it. Are you positive you don't want to run the frig and maybe a couple of lights as well as the air? It can add up. As an electrician, we install a few RV outlets every spring and usually repair the damage caused by the adaptor setup.
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Old 08-23-2011, 09:31 PM   #27
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It amazes me how many people will drop 10 -20K and up on an RV and not spend $100-$200 to make sure it gets the proper amount of power. They always talk to a bunch of friends who have done it for years with no problem but there are alot of variables. Cord length and gauge are important and to an extent is the conductors feeding the recep. Also, most home receptacles are rated 15 amps and are fed with 20 amps but most 20 amp breakers will hold 20 amps continuously. That generally winds up burning up the recep as well as whatever's plugged into it. Are you positive you don't want to run the frig and maybe a couple of lights as well as the air? It can add up. As an electrician, we install a few RV outlets every spring and usually repair the damage caused by the adaptor setup.
Kind of like we bragg about how we cut corners and saved a few bucks and then complain when the manufacturers do it!

My Home Hook Ups
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Old 08-23-2011, 10:07 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by fast murray View Post
It amazes me how many people will drop 10 -20K and up on an RV and not spend $100-$200 to make sure it gets the proper amount of power. They always talk to a bunch of friends who have done it for years with no problem but there are alot of variables. Cord length and gauge are important and to an extent is the conductors feeding the recep. Also, most home receptacles are rated 15 amps and are fed with 20 amps but most 20 amp breakers will hold 20 amps continuously. That generally winds up burning up the recep as well as whatever's plugged into it. Are you positive you don't want to run the frig and maybe a couple of lights as well as the air? It can add up. As an electrician, we install a few RV outlets every spring and usually repair the damage caused by the adaptor setup.
Yep! and then complain about the price of RV toilet paper.
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Old 08-24-2011, 12:31 AM   #29
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Install an exterior GFI outlet matched to the breaker in your panel. If you're overloading the exiting circuit it will become immediately evident but more importantly, nothing gets fried.
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Old 08-24-2011, 08:47 PM   #30
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Install an exterior GFI outlet matched to the breaker in your panel. If you're overloading the exiting circuit it will become immediately evident but more importantly, nothing gets fried.
Be careful not to mistake ground fault protection for overcurrent/overload protection. A GFCI should keep you from getting a shock but if overloaded they'll melt into a plastic mess with burned spots on it.
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