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Old 08-25-2019, 06:55 PM   #1
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Are you REALLY prepared?

While the news story I saw last night on TV primarily pertained to the West Coast that is waiting for "The Big One" (earthquake that is), natural disasters with long lasting effects can happen anywhere.

In the past Emergency Management Departments have been warning people to have the ability to survive without ANY support services. No electricity, communications, stores, fuel, etc. The topic of the news story was that 3 days is no longer deemed long enough. Our society has grown to the point that something like a massive earthquake will create hundreds of "islands" with the roads connecting being impassable for a variety of reasons. Landslides, sunken portions, destroyed bridges among them. Regular communications will be interrupted with cell services non-existant as they rely on towers that will be down and microwave links disrupted. Only working public communications will be Satellite Phones.

Water? What might be coming into your home could be contaminated. Electricity? We all know how that works after just a winter storm.

Like major earthquakes of the past, fire is a big source of destruction, especially in wood frame buildings (like houses).

The new recommendation put forth in the article is now 14 days.

Those of us who keep our RV's at home or are full timers can easily get ready for 14 days of survival although showers are probably out of the question due to water conservation. Some extra fuel for the generator or better yet, solar power to keep batteries charged. An extra bottle of propane, perhaps a couple if you live in an area prone to COLD.

Probably want some extra canned meals in the pantry (Canned Ravioli or Spaghetti may not sound good but it beats going hungry) as most refrigerated foods are only good for 7 days (varies of course) and frozen foods can disappear quickly if your RV freezer is the size of mine.

For those who have to keep their RV's in storage, hopefully you'll be able to reach it if disaster occurs.

Naturally the topic centered on Earthquake but for those in areas that never have earthquakes don't overlook other disasters like major wildland fires, Hurricanes, Floods, or fill in with your own disaster. When I watch or read the news it seems like just about every part of the country is plagued at one time or another with a life disrupting event and the aftermath sometimes lasts not just weeks, but even months.

Let us also not forget that every utility we depend on to make our lives easy from Electricity, Natural Gas, Transportation, Food, Clothing, Fuel, to Medical, may well be targeted for disruption by those in the World that don't like our way of life. Every time you drive down the highway and see the huge power lines just sitting out in a field, think how easy it would be for a determned individual to bring one or more of those towers down. The list goes on and I'm sure everyone could figure out what's on it but everyday we just assume "we'll be protected".

If you can, it might be a good idea to just be prepared for an impromptu camping trip (with no showers) that could last at least two weeks. That means you might want to keep the water tank full too and just change it every few months. In super cold areas some improvisation might be necessary to have water. This would be a time one could be glad they didn't jump on the "tankless water heater" bandwagon. Many of the tanks hold around 50 gallons of perfectly good drinking water.

I'm not trying to send a "Chicken Little" message. Just pointing out that nature has a way of making "stuff" happen. I've experienced 4 major earthquakes in my lifetime and had to travel through LA a week after the Northridge earthquake. Life was seriously interrupted in all of them so give preparation some thought for whatever disaster is most likely to occur in your area.
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:23 PM   #2
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...... in other words.... prepare for the worst and hope for the best.

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Old 08-25-2019, 07:46 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
While the news story I saw last night on TV primarily pertained to the West Coast that is waiting for "The Big One" (earthquake that is), natural disasters with long lasting effects can happen anywhere.



In the past Emergency Management Departments have been warning people to have the ability to survive without ANY support services. No electricity, communications, stores, fuel, etc. The topic of the news story was that 3 days is no longer deemed long enough. Our society has grown to the point that something like a massive earthquake will create hundreds of "islands" with the roads connecting being impassable for a variety of reasons. Landslides, sunken portions, destroyed bridges among them. Regular communications will be interrupted with cell services non-existant as they rely on towers that will be down and microwave links disrupted. Only working public communications will be Satellite Phones.



Water? What might be coming into your home could be contaminated. Electricity? We all know how that works after just a winter storm.



Like major earthquakes of the past, fire is a big source of destruction, especially in wood frame buildings (like houses).



The new recommendation put forth in the article is now 14 days.



Those of us who keep our RV's at home or are full timers can easily get ready for 14 days of survival although showers are probably out of the question due to water conservation. Some extra fuel for the generator or better yet, solar power to keep batteries charged. An extra bottle of propane, perhaps a couple if you live in an area prone to COLD.



Probably want some extra canned meals in the pantry (Canned Ravioli or Spaghetti may not sound good but it beats going hungry) as most refrigerated foods are only good for 7 days (varies of course) and frozen foods can disappear quickly if your RV freezer is the size of mine.



For those who have to keep their RV's in storage, hopefully you'll be able to reach it if disaster occurs.



Naturally the topic centered on Earthquake but for those in areas that never have earthquakes don't overlook other disasters like major wildland fires, Hurricanes, Floods, or fill in with your own disaster. When I watch or read the news it seems like just about every part of the country is plagued at one time or another with a life disrupting event and the aftermath sometimes lasts not just weeks, but even months.



Let us also not forget that every utility we depend on to make our lives easy from Electricity, Natural Gas, Transportation, Food, Clothing, Fuel, to Medical, may well be targeted for disruption by those in the World that don't like our way of life. Every time you drive down the highway and see the huge power lines just sitting out in a field, think how easy it would be for a determned individual to bring one or more of those towers down. The list goes on and I'm sure everyone could figure out what's on it but everyday we just assume "we'll be protected".



If you can, it might be a good idea to just be prepared for an impromptu camping trip (with no showers) that could last at least two weeks. That means you might want to keep the water tank full too and just change it every few months. In super cold areas some improvisation might be necessary to have water. This would be a time one could be glad they didn't jump on the "tankless water heater" bandwagon. Many of the tanks hold around 50 gallons of perfectly good drinking water.



I'm not trying to send a "Chicken Little" message. Just pointing out that nature has a way of making "stuff" happen. I've experienced 4 major earthquakes in my lifetime and had to travel through LA a week after the Northridge earthquake. Life was seriously interrupted in all of them so give preparation some thought for whatever disaster is most likely to occur in your area.
Regarding fresh water fills. I'd prefer to have the freshwater tank filled to the max as much as possible for keeping as much water as possible for keeping your sanitary water in good shape. On the other hand, 2-3 gallon jugs of water for drinking etc lasts a long time. 2-3 weeks for sure and is clean of anything else.
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:59 PM   #4
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I live in Northridge. Lived 15 minutes from the epicenter at the time. We have a 50 gallon home water heater that can be our drinking water and a swimming pool for flushing toilets. Since we have an electric stove in the house, the trailer can be our stove. Sure nice having 200AH of lithium batteries and 700w of solar as a backup.
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Old 08-26-2019, 08:36 AM   #5
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IMO, everyone should have a generator for when the apocalypse, Armageddon and Rapture happens. Keeping your food cold in your home fridge is a priority while you wait out the mass confusion. Like a fire extinguisher, seat belts and motorcycle helmet, when you need generator, you won't be able to buy one at any price.
My RV is in storage and roads may not be open and if they are they will be in gridlock.
I'll remember to keep my water tank full.
I was near Loma Prieta and know exactly what I was doing when it happened.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:32 AM   #6
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Yep! Because folks that are not prepared will see your lights and come try to take your stuff.
Yep, nice people will suddenly became deranged zombies when the SHTF.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:42 AM   #7
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If it was nuclear, I'm heading to ground zero and watch, I'll go quick and won't have to deal with CHAOS that will follow. I mean it will be "EXTREME CHAOS". Far more than anyone ever thinks about.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:45 AM   #8
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A few years ago I read a story about the safest place in the country for natural disasters, and it was Walla Walla, WA. So you only need to move a few hundred miles.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:58 AM   #9
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If it was nuclear, I'm heading to ground zero and watch, I'll go quick and won't have to deal with CHAOS that will follow. I mean it will be "EXTREME CHAOS". Far more than anyone ever thinks about.
Reminds me of that scene in "Dr. Strangelove" with Slim Pickens riding rodeo on the bomb.
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Old 08-26-2019, 03:27 PM   #10
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Sooner than you think

Lest you think that Mike's scenario is "off sometime in the future" or "never gonna happen"...

A year ago, Hurricane Florence struck the North Carolina coast. One of the most-damaged coastal cities was Wilmington, NC, a town of 100,000 people.

All eight highways into Wilmington were rendered impassable. The survivors had to make due with supplies already available in town. Private pilots set up a makeshift airlift--sort of reminiscent of the Berlin Airlift. FEMA was ready to charter a freighter that happened to be in Southport on Day 5 to bring in supplies when one of the narrow back roads in opened up.

This narrow road was kept secret (not shown as open on Waze) so approved supply trucks could travel. The first wide highway didn't open until eight days after landfall.
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Old 08-26-2019, 03:56 PM   #11
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We've actually had the 'Hurricane' situation happen and we were out of power and water for two weeks. We had plenty of provisions, but I can easily see where two weeks worth is a good amount of provisions to have ready.
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Old 08-26-2019, 03:57 PM   #12
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After living through the Nortridge earthquake and seeing the devastation of a hurricane, I will take an earthquake over the hurricane.
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Old 08-26-2019, 04:51 PM   #13
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Yep, nice people will suddenly became deranged zombies when the SHTF.
Thatís my concern! I donít have a fence around my lot and my MH is very visible from the street in my driveway. Not easy to defend against predators. Therefore, we arenít putting all our eggs in one basket. Have supply cache broken up and hidden in different locations. MH might be good for only a few days of hunkering down before itís raided. We have tents, sleeping bags, freeze dried food and water stored as backup. I think itís best to just open up the MH and help our neighbors as we have gone thru LAFD CERT training and CA EMT. We have neighbors who are nurses and I have a trauma kit. No chance of getting out of town. We are only 5 minutes from Babcock and our LA freeways will become impassable in any disaster. Babcock, hope you are in Tahoe and Iím
at Yosemite.
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Old 08-26-2019, 04:58 PM   #14
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Hurricane Fran

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We've actually had the 'Hurricane' situation happen and we were out of power and water for two weeks. We had plenty of provisions, but I can easily see where two weeks worth is a good amount of provisions to have ready.
When Fran hit (9/6/96) we were without power for eight days. Plenty of (municipal) water. Lots of propane for cooking on the grill. Moved most of the refrigerated and frozen food to the neighbors; they had a generator.

Power loss was spotty (unlike the situation Mike posited). Groceries were available. Some restaurants were open. The state provided plenty of ice for coolers. It could have been much worse.
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Old 08-26-2019, 05:08 PM   #15
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Old 08-26-2019, 05:24 PM   #16
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Water, 1 gallon per day per person (don't forget Fido needs his own water.) Water should be stored in plastic water jugs, DO NOT use milk jugs. You cannot get them clean enough , your water will go bad in a couple of weeks, Rotate it out every 6 months per government and my own tests. Prescription meds, eyeglasses, first aid supplies, extra socks etc. A shrill whistle, like the Coast Guard recommends, much easier to hear then your yelling, fire starting equipment, money, ATM's and banks will not be open. I could go on and on. The above is just things I did NOT see mentioned in the above posts.

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Old 08-26-2019, 05:26 PM   #17
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Reminds me of that scene in "Dr. Strangelove" with Slim Pickens riding rodeo on the bomb.
YEEHAA !!!
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Old 08-26-2019, 05:44 PM   #18
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Water, 1 gallon per day per person (don't forget Fido needs his own water.) Water should be stored in plastic water jugs, DO NOT use milk jugs. You cannot get them clean enough , your water will go bad in a couple of weeks,
I'd never heard of that before. Can you elaborate? A quick search turned up differing opinions, naturally...

It looks like short-term storage, less than a month or so, seems to be OK. Do you agree?

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Old 08-26-2019, 05:46 PM   #19
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"Can you really be Prepared" ???

Several years ago at the College World Series...not far from where I live, they had to put their "Emergency Preparedness" to test. One of the things they have a plan for is..."Sever Weather." A large Thunderstorm popped up just as one of the games was underway. High damaging winds, large hail, Lightning and possible funnels sited. They put their "Evacuation Plan" into effect. Almost immediately...CHAOS !! Their traffic plan failed (only worked under their drills...not REAL LIFE) Traffic went to Gridlock within minutes, with storm approaching rapidly, officers began removing people from their autos to get them inside to safety. Little did they realize that they had now blocked the Stadium from any access by Emergency Vehicles for at least 6 blocks. Luckily the storm blew through quickly with little to no damage except for outdoor vendor tents. It wasn't until they evaluated the situation later, they realized that had the area taken a direct hit, it would've been impossible to get emergency vehicles into the area to treat wounded. Any response would've been extremely delayed resulting in a much higher probability of loss of life due to a delayed response in medical treatment. Everything looks good on paper and you can run all the drills you want, but in the actual situation....all bets are off because you "Practice" under controlled conditions, but when the SHTF, that goes out the window and you better be able to improvise quickly.
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Old 08-26-2019, 05:48 PM   #20
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A few years ago I read a story about the safest place in the country for natural disasters, and it was Walla Walla, WA. So you only need to move a few hundred miles.
I'd be reading up on the Cascadia Subduction Zone before making that move. A friend used to be a high-level director with FEMA and he spent months in Washington and Oregon just a few years ago working with the governments on preparedness. Then there is this from three months ago: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle...on-and-canada/

"It knocked people off their feet at Snoqualmie Pass, cracked the lighthouse on Dungeness spit, and broke windows and glassware from Walla Walla to Seattle."

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