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Old 12-10-2020, 08:16 PM   #21
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Evac

My wife and I were situated in a gorgeous rv slot in the Ponderosa pines at the Kaibab Lodge close to the North Rim for the summer where we worked as Workampers.
We had weekends off so were almost 2 hours away hiking in Zion.
On the way back to a friends house in Hurricane where we were planning on spending the Friday and Saturday nights. We received a call that we might have to evacuate because of a fire up on the Kaibab Uplift!
So we drove back to our trailer and got ready. At about 5pm we were told to leave immediately. We saw the smoke and hastily packed up. Then for some reason the main slide out would not move in...
So I had to drive it forward across the steep dirt road so that the 5th wheel was canted down And then gravity assisted the slide out to close!
We drove out as the twilight was darkening and just past the Jakob Lake junction, we could see the fire ahead. Jumping from tree to treetops in the high winds.
As we drove down the steep 89A, we could see the flames only about 200 yards to our left and roaring in our direction.
We made it out ok but the fire crossed the road about 45 minutes later! It eventually burned 73,000 acres of beautiful forest.
A week later we could return to our site.
But from then on, I had the pickup truck backed under the hitch ready to drop in!
We had a great summer there after that....
BTW..I have been RVing for over 30 years and this was the closest call...
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Old 12-10-2020, 08:28 PM   #22
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I was camping in Cherokee, NC this summer. There had been a thunderstorm that afternoon and suddenly right after supper campground personnel were telling everyone along the river (which we were) that we had less than 15 minutes before a flash flood came through and to get as far from the river as we could. We threw our 4 year old in the back seat of the truck and told her to stay there, and completely unhooked, literally throwing everything in the middle of the camper, and moved in less than 10 minutes to the other side of the campground along with approximately 20-30 other campers. The water came up the 10+ ft rock wall along the creek right to the top in a matter of seconds, but never crested it. We spent about 2 hours waiting for the water to start receding so we could return to our campsite. River looked like nothing happened the next morning. A lot of people there said they had heard about it happening there before, but never witnessed it. Guess we all have a story now.
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Old 12-10-2020, 08:33 PM   #23
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YES we were camping at Glacier National Park and a massive fire started from camp fire.
It was crazy and people pannicked. We got out safely.
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Old 12-10-2020, 09:08 PM   #24
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Sound Idea

Reminiscent of of working summers in Yellowstone NP where fires burn free.
When a Ranger stops in the warn you about a new fire that has the potential to sweeping through camp; it gives you pause to consider your options.
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Old 12-10-2020, 10:59 PM   #25
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Evacuation

I experienced the Oregon fires earlier this year. There was no time to hook-up and get the coach and Jeep out of the evacuation area. We were told not to pack and to leave immediately.

Had my pets, some food and clothes in the Jeep and had to leave everything else behind. Fortunately, the fire only got close. It was within five miles. I lost the contents of my refrigerator but consider myself fortunate. We could have lost everything.

I agree that it is a good idea to be prepared, but have a plan "B". You may not have time to do as planned.
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Old 12-11-2020, 07:35 AM   #26
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👍🏻 excellent thinking
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Old 12-11-2020, 07:43 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by DRogers View Post
People still use check books? sorry couldn't resist
YUp ... darn near every day. With all the hacking, etc. I do not have nor want a Debit card - no safety protection. Also no banking 'on line' with all the hacking.
Cash or check ...sometimes credit card is ONLY way to go.

Every bill -- credit card, utility, mortgage, insurance, etc. is paid by CHECK!



AS far a leaving a campground when in severe immediate danger .... get in the tow vehicle and hit the road out!
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Old 12-11-2020, 07:48 AM   #28
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The campground has seasons. Summer is too busy for us too. The fall, spring and winter are not as bad. I know that it sounds crazy but we go there to get away. The ocean waves are soothing.
Camping is to get away from people.

With a campground that size ... may as well stay home!
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Old 12-11-2020, 12:01 PM   #29
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Yes! I was a camp host when a fire broke out nearby, Rangers finally came to the campground about 11pm to start evacuating.... it was a big campground but we got it emptied pretty quick without people leaving stuff behind. The key is not to panic!!
They all went home, I was misplaced for a bit
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Old 12-11-2020, 12:48 PM   #30
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Fire Safety

This is a good time to review your fire safety tips for INSIDE your camper.

1. Hopefully, you check your smoke detector(s) monthly and replace the batteries at the beginning of each season. These detectors are typically both a CO and smoke detector. Purchase additional smoke detectors for the sleeping areas as backup to the original detector that came with the camper. Also, these detectors are only good for up to 10 years so if you have an older camper, replace the detector. They're cheap!

2. Check your fire extinguisher. Typically, the manufacturers place these at the exit door. This really makes no sense as if there is a fire inside the camper, the last thing you are going to try to do is extinguish it as you are exiting the camper to safety. Campers are horrible when it comes to the spread of fire. Having an extinguisher at the exit door is not going to help you escape from a fire if necessary as you are already at the exit door where you can exit unharmed. Purchase an additional extinguisher(s) and keep it readily accessible in the bedroom areas. Should a fire start in the middle of the night, you want an extinguisher readily available to exit the camper as you can use it to help "clear" a path to exit the camper. It may give you enough time to open the emergency window and escape unharmed. These windows are not easy to crawl out of like a door, especially in an emergency. It would be a good idea to practice exiting them to see the difficulty in getting out. Typically, they are blocked with clothes, TVs, or other items increasing the time frame for a safe exit. Remember to stay low to the floor where the air will be clearer from smoke. These windows are waist high so you'll have to "stand" to get out the window where the smoke will be thicker. Shake the extinguishers yearly as the powder can settle and clog over time, especially when they can be stored in cold climates over the winter. Replace the older extinguishers with a quality extinguisher that has a metal head. These can be inspected and recharged every few years.

3. Keep the bedroom door closed at night. This can help hold off the spread of fire and smoke for you to safely exit the camper while you're trying to get out the window or door. Smoke is the biggest killer in a fire, not the flames. It can render you unconscious before the flames get to you.

4. Keep the outside areas clear under the exit windows. Should the need arise to exit the camper through these windows, you don't want obstacles preventing a clear means of egress away from the camper. You don't need to be stumbling over chairs or other obstacles that could cause you to trip and injure yourself further slowing your chances of clearing the camper safely.

5. If you do witness a camper on fire, STAY AWAY!!! The propane cylinders can explode sending rockets to the entire area! Check out some of the videos on YouTube to see how quickly these fires consume a camper.
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Old 12-11-2020, 01:19 PM   #31
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People still use check books? sorry couldn't resist
For my plumbing business, I have accepted nothing other than cash or checks for customer payments for the last 27 years. Hardly anybody pays with cash, though.

There are too many advantages of only accepting cash and checks instead of plastic to list them all. I will list just a few, though: There is the obvious advantage of not having to pay a fee to the card companies; cash and checks are virtually instantly available once they are deposited, which is not the case with card payments; cash and check payments cannot be ďdisputedĒ like card payments. It is illegal to stop payment on a check for services (in VA, at least), but it is not illegal to dispute a credit card charge for services. Checks are just about as good as cash to me, but they are 100 times better than credit card payments for so many reasons additional to what I mentioned.

Today, people have no problem disputing a credit card payment for the most ridiculous and dishonest reasons which results in a business losing time and money trying to recover the money the card company took back from them. I have heard horror stories from other business owners about trying to settle bogus disputes ó many times never seeing that money again.

There is not one day that goes by where at least one customer says ďI canít remember the last time I wrote a checkĒ. There is not one week that goes by where I donít have to fill out at least one customerís check so all they need to do is sign it. I donít mind teaching them how to write checks, though.

Checks are a great thing!

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Old 12-11-2020, 01:30 PM   #32
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We have camped many times at some of the larger places in the Myrtle Beach area and no doubt....they are a bee hive of campers. Packing them in there tightly. Roads are narrow. So if there was ever an emergency, getting out with the RV would be difficult at best as there would be a log jam.

In a true emergency, I would leave the RV behind and call Progressive afterwards. Throw the family and animals in the truck and off we'd go. Shoot if we couldn't get the truck out, we'd take to foot. All that "stuff" can be replaced.

Comments were made about fires in a campground. It happens: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/mu...nd/ar-BB17ppag
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Old 12-12-2020, 09:26 AM   #33
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We had a terrible storm hit while we were in Shipshewana, IN in June. The high winds hit the night before so we had already brought in our side and outside items, It got progressively worse the next day. We were watching the radar on my iPhone and decided to "abandon ship". We put our valuables in the truck and took off. It looked like the skies to the east were safer so we headed east. However, in a matter of minutes, the storm split and it was on both sides of us, with the east now looking worse than the west. So, we headed west and had to drive through the storm to safer grounds. We spent a few hours driving around until it was safe to return to the campground. VERY scary. It is wise to have an escape route planned everywhere you go. Safe travels and happy camping everyone!
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Old 12-12-2020, 09:44 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by jd4010 View Post
We have camped many times at some of the larger places in the Myrtle Beach area and no doubt....they are a bee hive of campers. Packing them in there tightly. Roads are narrow. So if there was ever an emergency, getting out with the RV would be difficult at best as there would be a log jam.

In a true emergency, I would leave the RV behind and call Progressive afterwards. Throw the family and animals in the truck and off we'd go. Shoot if we couldn't get the truck out, we'd take to foot. All that "stuff" can be replaced.

Comments were made about fires in a campground. It happens: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/mu...nd/ar-BB17ppag
We have also camped at the Myrtle mega-parks many times...but only in winter. Can't imagine the chaos and golf cart parades we've heard about in summer.
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Old 12-12-2020, 10:25 AM   #35
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Reviewing Emergency Evacuation Plan

[QUOTE=Ejetter;2464038]This is a good time to review your fire safety tips for INSIDE your camper.

Absolutely agree, DW & I stayed at the Hiddenite Family Campground on the South Yadkin River this summer. While there it rained. River rose significantly, but TT was not in danger of flooding during that stay. However 3 weeks later it rained more and the campground flooded, and very sadly 5 lives were lost. Had we been there during the flooding weekend, probably would have not been able to get out. 20 something campers, exiting across a fast moving low spot, then half mile up a muddy/rutted narrow road. We are seasonal campers in Southern Piedmont of NC. During this off season we are working on developing a quick evac plan to include fire and flooding. Learning by experience.

P.S. I'm OLD school and carry both a checkbook and cash!

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