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Old 08-23-2021, 06:29 PM   #21
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Most dual band 2m 440 radios have the ability to scan all the channels entered. Most have up to 200 channels. It is simple to do with chirp, a free app with access to all repeaters.
I have different corridors loaded on mine. Here to Yellowstone. Down the rockies. Here down 35. Here to superior, etc. I usually just scan the repeaters because that is where everyone is. On one of my trucks I simply used a topper clamp on the side of the bed as an antenna base. .......,.....
QUOTEE=Tabasco_Joe;2619905]Which band are they on? I assume 2 meters?
Any specific freq?
I've never heard a trucker on the band but I haven't searched for them.
I'm on most of the Philly area repeaters. I'm often scanning them. Never heard any there. There are commuters that often jump on as they go through town. But it's local discussion. Nothing related to traffic/road conditions unless there is a storm.
I live on a hill and I've got a reasonably good 2 M / 70 CM base station.
I'm a general class.

I will say that in my area the repeaters are the best place to get winter storm road conditions.

If there is a common freq I'll add that to my scan list. I can certainly pick up anything on I-95 or I-276 in PA.

Thanks for the idea.[/QUOTE]
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Old 08-23-2021, 06:30 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Tabasco_Joe View Post
I haven't been on CB for many years but I'm setting up for long distance RV trips when I retire next year. I see some truckers still using for road conditions. Is it worth putting one in the TV for longer interstate drives?
In the areas with no cell coverage I see no other way to get a weather forecast than CB radio. It has happened to me quite often in Minnesota, Alaska, and Canadian Yukon Territory, and NWT.
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Old 08-23-2021, 06:33 PM   #23
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There are reasons folks moved away from CB radios. Abuse. Immaturity. No enforcement of rules / no consequences for rule breakers. It became a target for car prowls & break-ins. VERY limited distance. Ridiculous amounts of static & noise, based on solar interference and radio operators illegally boosting their signal strength for broadcasts--which never helped them a bit, since it didn't boost their reception. Folks 75 miles away might hear them, but couldn't talk back to them. Much of the freeway traffic was focused on reporting speed traps--I've no use for folks who just want to use it try to get away with breaking the law. In short, adults grew out of it. Kids in my area still use it because they think it makes them look important. But all they use it for is playing hide-and-seek in cars, or spouting profanities. A ham radio is the way to go if you're intent on talking with others on the highway, but rules about NOT using hand-held microphones and distracting your attention while adjusting radio channels seem to be good reminders that we don't need another driver on the road who's not paying attention to driving 100% of the time. I'd dump the idea of a two-way radio, CB or ham.
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Old 08-23-2021, 06:39 PM   #24
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Is it worth it for long Interstate drives? I'd say no. I've had one in my motorhome for years and it's mostly a novelty to listen in on chatter, which imho is very little until you get near larger cities where there's commerce.

I've got a Cobra with the thru the glass pickup antenna and it works well given its small mast.

If you get one, I recommend one with NOOA weather bands which are quite helpful in getting up to the minute weather forecasts in any part of the country, especially helpful in severe weather.

Yes, your copilot can use their smart phone for the weather but having it on the CB frees up a pair of hands, and everyone is hearing the weather and can make decisions and someone can look at potential route changes, advise on stops, etc
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Old 08-23-2021, 06:42 PM   #25
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Get Your Ham Radio Ticket

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Originally Posted by C36hull268 View Post
In the areas with no cell coverage I see no other way to get a weather forecast than CB radio. It has happened to me quite often in Minnesota, Alaska, and Canadian Yukon Territory, and NWT.

As others have said, get your Amateur Radio Technician class license. You'll have access to the VHF/UHF bands (and above). I don't know about repeater access in Alaska, but I've been in a lot of areas with no cell coverage where I could get to a 2m repeater. (Carry a copy of the Repeater Book in your rig.)


Plus, my Kenwood mobile (and handheld) radios have the NOAA Weather Channels pre-programmed into them and I can get weather information when out of cellular service.


I usually tell people to go ahead and study up for the General Class license if you're working on the Tech. It's not much more difficult and will get you access to the HF bands. That will give you a lot more reach, even with a mobile radio in your rig.


On my last trip halfway across the lower 48, I monitored 146.52MHz (national calling frequency). I made several contacts along the way. On my way home there was a big traffic pileup east from Mound House on US50. I called on 146.52MHz to see if anyone was monitoring and could give me a report.


Two hams responded to me and informed me there was an accident working a couple miles ahead of me. There was no alternate route, but at least I knew I was dealing with a half-hour wait and not something more.
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Old 08-23-2021, 06:46 PM   #26
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I was really active on CB radio back in the early/mid 90's. In 2008, Wodstock and I both got our Ham radio tickets, and we've both upgraded to Amateur Extra since then.


The problem with CB radio isn't necessarily the people on it, though, there is quite a bit of trash. The band isn't really that good with ground-wave propagation. And, it's usually not THAT good at skywave, either. Openings aren't as consistent as with other HF bands. Combine that with most people running compromised antennas, that are usually not mounted in the optimum location, and the 4 watt TX power cap (though, lots do run amps, or higher power rigs), and it's not all that good. Amplitude Modulation is also very susceptible to interference from all sorts of sources, which doesn't help the situation. Most of the CB antennas are just 1/4 wave, and are made up of coils of wire, which reduce efficiency from a straight 1/4 wave whip. Magnet mounts, as long as they're pretty large, do a decent job of coupling the antenna, but I will drill holes and install NMO mounts for my antennas. Clean install, no issues with rust, paint damage, or the antenna falling off.



There are a couple truckers in my area that will run the local repeaters in western and central NY, and in most areas of the country, you could get into one with a 50 watt 2-meter rig, and a half wave or better antenna. Repeaterbook on a phone is a good resource for repeaters, and as long as your phone gets a GPS signal, it can get you a list of repeaters in the area, the database is stored on the device.


I still have a CB radio in my TV, using a 1/4 wave NMO mount Browning antenna on the roof. The radio is a Uniden Pro520XL with a little more audio, and maybe another 1/2 watt of carrier. It works, but when the band is open, I can talk to people 200-500 miles away easier than someone 2-5 miles away. Avoid channels 6 and 26 when the band's open, and 38 LSB is used for DX during those times, too.


Getting a technician class ham radio license isn't all that difficult, but, as Yoda said, you do have to unlearn what you have learned with CB radio. There's so much bad information in the CB world, it's kinda funny. You'll figure it out, and there's no "magical" antenna, and all those amps with "pills" are really over-rated, and lack any type of quality filters to keep from interfering with lots of other radio bands.
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Old 08-23-2021, 07:06 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Tabasco_Joe View Post
I haven't been on CB for many years but I'm setting up for long distance RV trips when I retire next year. I see some truckers still using for road conditions. Is it worth putting one in the TV for longer interstate drives?
I still have one in my rig and use it when others in the family travel together.
Not sure how much your into cb back in the day but still out there, just need some power!!!
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Old 08-23-2021, 07:38 PM   #28
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"0" cellular phones killed the c b market. listening in is a privacy concern.
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Old 08-23-2021, 07:58 PM   #29
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I use my CB every day.
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Old 08-23-2021, 08:11 PM   #30
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we had linear ""sp"" blow you out of the vehicle. and range incredible .in the 70's.
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Old 08-23-2021, 08:19 PM   #31
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CB Radio

i personly like the idear of the radio i had one when i was in my 20th loved it then ...some day id like to get a fingham Radio i beleave there out of illinois's ? ..
i dont care about the trash .. i sling my own crap back at them ....
there handy an brakes up the monotony .




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Old 08-23-2021, 08:25 PM   #32
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A CB works great while traveling with family. Like many have stated on this thread there's not much going on these days in the Citizen Band and when there is, its major trash (mainly on Channel 19). My brother-in-law and I purposefully installed CBs so we could have instant communication while driving instead of trying to call each other on a cell phone. It's been a great addition and especially for the long hauls out West. For what we are using it for the reception and limited range is perfect. We use channels 10 through 13 and we rarely hear anyone.

My setup is a Uniden PC68LTX CB, Valley Enterprises Fender Mount Antenna Bracket (no drilling holes in the (TV) truck), Browning BR-140-B Antenna, Browning WSPBR1015 Enclosed NMO 3/4 Hole Mount Coax and a Tram 1290 Rain Cap. Everything is set up so I can pull it out for most of the year and install it for the big trips. You wouldn't know it's there except for the bracket with a little black cap on it peaking out from the side of the hood.
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Old 08-23-2021, 08:29 PM   #33
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Cb radio is a tool

��new commercial driver here daughter of a 60yr veteran trucker, sister of a 40-year veteran trucker and soon to be co-driver to said brother. My brother and my dad my uncle's my cousins they all said the same thing about CB'S "CBS are not to be used for just blowing off steam or acting a fool, CBS are used as a tool" they come in handy when you're caught in the snow storm and you can't see the road in front of you but you can holler out and find out if you should pull into a truck stop or keep a rolling. I don't necessarily agree with all of the nonsense that goes on channel 18 or 21 but it does come in handy when you're sitting in traffic bumper to bumper and you're in the third or fourth Lane and you could get off the road and wait it out.
Many times when I was going across to Florida through that stretch of I-10 in Texas or Louisiana it would have been nice to know if the roads were out or if I could continue going. I got caught in a hell of a storm, i think it was Nevada, and all I could do was pull over to the side of the road. Thankfully my little trailer had enough water in the tanks where I didn't have to worry about when I needed to go to the bathroom or when I need her to drink water but I think I was stuck for about 4 hours. Im going to install one in my vehicle once I get back to work.
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Old 08-23-2021, 08:50 PM   #34
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Is anyone on the highways using FRS/GMRS?
I carry a pair of GMRS HT's on the road... I plan to get a mobile rig soon.
We use them primarily when traveling with a group.
If I did get a CB, it would be to monitor more than talk.
My next move is to get my Technician License so I can use VHF/UHF.

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Old 08-23-2021, 08:57 PM   #35
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I have the cheap cobra that has all the controls in the microphone. I have it just to find out why traffic is backed up and what lane I need to be in. Ch 19 is not what it used to be. I can drive for hours and not hear a peep.
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Old 08-23-2021, 09:04 PM   #36
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If you are traveling with family you may want to shy away. the language is often not family friendly.
Agree, I finally gave up on the CB because of all the abusive language..
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Old 08-23-2021, 09:54 PM   #37
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I asked the same question about 5 years ago on another forum when I owned another brand, and I got pretty much the same responses you are getting. It kind of bummed me out because I have a lot of great memories related to traveling with a CB. Back in the day the chatter was polite, fun, and informative. I could get "Smokey" reports, road conditions, Stalled vehicles, etc, etc. The trucker channel was 19, and the RV channel was 10.

It would be a great way to communicate if you were in a Caravan with other RV'ers.

I wish it would make a comeback, but not sure that will ever happen. It would be so fun to talk to other RV'ers on the road and even in the Campground. If I could figure out a way to re-start the whole thing I would.

Oh Well...

Dirty Dog out: 10-10 and on the side
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Old 08-23-2021, 09:54 PM   #38
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If you just need accurate road and traffic info...and you are not out in BFE, Google Maps and Waze (crowdsource traffic app) on your phone can give you alot of what you may need. I use both apps when I am on the road and they provide all the Intel necessary about traffic and rerouting. I use gmrs walkie talkies with my RV convoy friends.
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Old 08-24-2021, 01:18 AM   #39
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Thanks. I'm more interested in any benefit in getting traffic type reports on major highways. They seem to have good cell coverage. It doesn't sound like I should go to any special effort to mount an antenna to check CB out.
You want traffic reports use waz navigation on your phone. Let's your know where the hacked are, police and a whole lot more. CB radio or trash.
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Old 08-24-2021, 06:42 AM   #40
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As others have said, get your Amateur Radio Technician class license. You'll have access to the VHF/UHF bands (and above). I don't know about repeater access in Alaska, but I've been in a lot of areas with no cell coverage where I could get to a 2m repeater. (Carry a copy of the Repeater Book in your rig.)


Plus, my Kenwood mobile (and handheld) radios have the NOAA Weather Channels pre-programmed into them and I can get weather information when out of cellular service.


I usually tell people to go ahead and study up for the General Class license if you're working on the Tech. It's not much more difficult and will get you access to the HF bands. That will give you a lot more reach, even with a mobile radio in your rig.


On my last trip halfway across the lower 48, I monitored 146.52MHz (national calling frequency). I made several contacts along the way. On my way home there was a big traffic pileup east from Mound House on US50. I called on 146.52MHz to see if anyone was monitoring and could give me a report.


Two hams responded to me and informed me there was an accident working a couple miles ahead of me. There was no alternate route, but at least I knew I was dealing with a half-hour wait and not something more.
I have a general class.
The aluminum body makes antennas more challenging for both CB and amateur. So it's more a question of deciding if the effort is worth it.
I don't have an amateur radio mounted in the truck (new truck) but I do have HTs so easy enough to take along on some trips to see it they are useful.

I have a CB unit that can be installed. I hooked it up to a base antenna and did not hear anything from I-95 or I-276 which aren't too far away. I did hear stations booming in from southern states just like the old days.

As far as weather I have a number of units that can receive NOAA broadcasts. Marine HT, Amateur HT, and the infamous Baofeng.
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