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Old 04-11-2020, 02:09 PM   #1
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Greasing wheel bearings?

How do I grease 2020 Palomino Puma wheel bearings? There is a plastic cap on each wheel with a rubber seal inside-I assume that leads to a grease fitting?
Then how often and how much do you grease with a hand gun?
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Old 04-11-2020, 02:49 PM   #2
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Hi Foothills,

If there is a grease fitting, you have Ez-Lube bearings. Read carefully how to use these before trying. Using them wrong can cause damage to the grease seal resulting in grease all over your brakes. Not good!

How handy are you? Have you ever hand-packed bearings before? If not you might want to consider having a shop pack them for you. You don’t have to pack them often, every two or three years seems to work.
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Old 04-11-2020, 03:22 PM   #3
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Wheel bearings require removal from the axle, cleaning, inspecting, greasing, and reassembling on the axle. Typical requirement is 12,000 miles or 12 months regardless of there being grease fittings. RV shop will probably want $150/axle. Easy albeit messy DIY job. Done regularly the bearings will last "forever." Mine are on their 16th year.

Adjust the brakes while you're in there.

-- Chuck
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Old 04-11-2020, 03:56 PM   #4
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Wheel bearings require removal from the axle, cleaning, inspecting, greasing, and reassembling on the axle. Typical requirement is 12,000 miles or 12 months regardless of there being grease fittings. RV shop will probably want $150/axle. Easy albeit messy DIY job. Done regularly the bearings will last "forever." Mine are on their 16th year.

Adjust the brakes while you're in there.

-- Chuck
It's strange that the engineers and lawyers at the companies who make the EZ Lube systems, and the manufacturers who install those systems on their trailers don't agree with you. I wonder why that is?
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Old 04-11-2020, 04:16 PM   #5
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It's strange that the engineers and lawyers at the companies who make the EZ Lube systems, and the manufacturers who install those systems on their trailers don't agree with you. I wonder why that is?
You mean Dexter who says to pull the wheels, inspect bearings and repack every 12K miles or each year?

https://www.dexteraxle.com/docs/defa...rsn=30dee048_0
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Old 04-11-2020, 04:51 PM   #6
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Just to provide the instructions...

Before getting to the how-to, there are lots of people who swear AT E-Z-Lubing bearings. They say it is an invitation to disaster. There are many others who do e-z-lube without issue. You can decide which side to be on.

If you have e-z-lube hubs, the procedure is:
1. Jack up your trailer so the wheel to be worked on is off the ground.
2. remove the rubber cap.
3. attach a MANUAL grease gun to the fitting
4. start spinning the wheel, 10-20 rpms is good.
5. SLOWLY pump your grease gun adding grease until you see fresh grease coming out of the center of the hub behind where the zerk fitting is.
6. clean out all of the old grease.
7. reinstall the rubber cap
8. lower the trailer

Repeat above on other wheels.

A couple of suggestions. This will go better if the wheel is warm, so do the greasing on a >70F degree day or take the trailer for a bit of a drive to warm up the old grease.
Pumping the grease SLOWLY is important - pumping to fast may cause the rear grease seal to fail. This is how you get grease on your brakes. NOT GOOD. Spinning the wheel aids grease flow thru the bearings, spinning IS important.

A web search on E-Z-Lube RV axles should find a number of U-Tubes on doing this process.

Good luck - safe travels.
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Old 04-11-2020, 05:21 PM   #7
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If you're naive enough to think this replaces cleaning and repacking your axle bearings go for it. Recommend you carry a complete spindle and bearing set for when the bearings fail on the road. Or your brakes don't work from all the grease inside them.

-- Chuck
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Old 04-11-2020, 05:54 PM   #8
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If you're naive enough to think this replaces cleaning and repacking your axle bearings go for it. Recommend you carry a complete spindle and bearing set for when the bearings fail on the road. Or your brakes don't work from all the grease inside them.

-- Chuck
...because the engineers went to the lawyers and said "Hey, guys! We just came up with this totally inadequate, and frankly, completely unsafe system for lubricating bearings! The advantage is that it's faster, easier, and cleaner than the way we have had to do it for the last fifty years - the disadvantage is that it's going to ruin the bearings, races, and spindles. Oh! And it's going to leak grease all over the trailer brakes, rendering them useless!"

And the lawyers said "That's great!!! We almost never get sued for criminal negligence anymore! A couple hundred lawsuits against us might even allow us to increase headcount in the legal department! Let's go with it!!!!"

Oh, and if by "naive" you mean "astute enough to recognize that the state of the art can change", then yep, that's me!
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Old 04-11-2020, 06:36 PM   #9
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...because the engineers went to the lawyers and said "Hey, guys! We just came up with this totally inadequate, and frankly, completely unsafe system for lubricating bearings! The advantage is that it's faster, easier, and cleaner than the way we have had to do it for the last fifty years - the disadvantage is that it's going to ruin the bearings, races, and spindles. Oh! And it's going to leak grease all over the trailer brakes, rendering them useless!"

And the lawyers said "That's great!!! We almost never get sued for criminal negligence anymore! A couple hundred lawsuits against us might even allow us to increase headcount in the legal department! Let's go with it!!!!"

Oh, and if by "naive" you mean "astute enough to recognize that the state of the art can change", then yep, that's me!
Have YOU had the problems you described with an EZ Lube systen? Or are you merely passing on what you heard, read, or watched a Youtube video about.

I have and use the EZ Lube system and have had zero, nada, zip, zilch problems.

Fwiw, I wonder how many TT owners actually put 12k miles a year on them. I'm sure some do but most don't. I do and mine only get the hubs pulled every two years. Been doing that since my first TT (1972 model) with not a single brake or bearing failure.

On my brake backing plates i can see both back of seal----no grease leaks, and brake lining thickness at side of shoes.


Sorry, wrong quote. Meant for Chuck S.
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Old 04-11-2020, 07:14 PM   #10
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EZ Lube has been cussed and discussed for years on many RV forums. Some staunchly support the invention while others vehemently reject it. I work on trailers on the side and have seen way too many greased up brake shoes to trust the little grease jerk in the middle of the spindle.

Granted, improper procedure has been many a cause, but I'd like to point this out and then graciously step away from the podium. If EZ lube is such a great invention, then why does Dexter never ship an EZ lube axle with the proper amount of grease in it to work correctly without the buyer pumping nearly a tube of grease into each hub the first time? Is Dexter so in fear of the seal passing grease that they won't risk it right at the factory? Also ... don't you successful uses find it odd that you are pumping used grease from the inner bearing directly into the outer bearing. You'll never convince me that the outer bearing will get anywhere near 100% clean grease using the EZ lube. This being said ... good deal for those of you who have had success with the invention.
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Old 04-11-2020, 07:45 PM   #11
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EZ Lube has been cussed and discussed for years on many RV forums. Some staunchly support the invention while others vehemently reject it. I work on trailers on the side and have seen way too many greased up brake shoes to trust the little grease jerk in the middle of the spindle.

Granted, improper procedure has been many a cause, but I'd like to point this out and then graciously step away from the podium. If EZ lube is such a great invention, then why does Dexter never ship an EZ lube axle with the proper amount of grease in it to work correctly without the buyer pumping nearly a tube of grease into each hub the first time? Is Dexter so in fear of the seal passing grease that they won't risk it right at the factory? Also ... don't you successful uses find it odd that you are pumping used grease from the inner bearing directly into the outer bearing. You'll never convince me that the outer bearing will get anywhere near 100% clean grease using the EZ lube. This being said ... good deal for those of you who have had success with the invention.
When i first greased my bearings on my 2018 TT using the EZ Lube, I greased all four wheels using less about half a tube total. And grease started to flow around front bearing almost immediately.

Maybe it was an issue on earlier models that was corrected after a few complaints.
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Old 04-11-2020, 08:05 PM   #12
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Thanks everyone, and especially TitanMike who's had success and dieselguy-who raised the really critical question. I used the traditional system on my old Jayco for 18 years-complete repacking every 2 or 3 years, and no problems but considerable expense and I felt I always had to watch where the mechanic pit the jack-so now would like to do it myself. So now I've got something new and as Mike says most don't drive 12K per year so I wondered if there is a better option. If I didn't totally repack again, I would be mighty light on the grease gun-just put in a couple strokes in the fall and maybe every 3 years maybe take it to a mechanic who will listen to how I want it jacked up.
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Old 04-11-2020, 08:13 PM   #13
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I'll respond just once more because the two groups of EZ lube owners never seem to find common ground. I've probably had hands on over 2 dozen sets of EZ lube axles spanning the past years as it's not a new invention. (I know not a great number as I generally won't use the EZ lube unless pressed by a customer) Of the ones that didn't have greased up brake shoes indicating prior addition of new grease ... the rest needed almost 1 full tube of grease before any would come out the outer bearing. Perhaps yours was successfully filled by your selling dealer. My most recent example of just enough grease to coat the bearings was a 2019 Montana 3730FL ... I hesitantly used the EZ lube on it by customer request.
It required a bit over 3 tubes total of grease painstakingly pumped into each spindle while SLOWLY rotating the jacked up tire. So empty spindle housings are still shipping from Dexter.
I'm glad your personal experience has been positive. I do not deny some of you have excellent results. My and several independent mechanics point is the failure rate due to whatever end is too high for many of us to use from a business standpoint.

PS For those who feel pumping 2-3 squirts in a season is good practice ... I say it's just a placebo of peace of mind. Unless the wheel cavity is full of grease to start with, 2-3 squirts does absolutely nothing.
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Old 04-11-2020, 08:23 PM   #14
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Bearings

If done by specs, the E-Z bearings are great. I do mine every spring on a warm day after driving a little. LIKE OTHERS SAY -Go slow w/ grease gun. I have used them on all 3 trailers we have had w/ zero problems. The problems come when people do not read the manual. Spin the wheel while you pump grease. If a new trailer, have an extra tube of grease on hand as I have found the mfg. does not always put enough grease to start.
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Old 04-11-2020, 09:07 PM   #15
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If you use the LAZ-Lube, how are you inspecting the bearings themselves and the brakes?
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Old 04-12-2020, 07:21 AM   #16
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If you use the LAZ-Lube, how are you inspecting the bearings themselves and the brakes?
Well, this is the drawback of using ez-lube to grease the bearings. Dexter still recommends inspecting the bearings annually (may be overkill) and there is no way to inspect them without removing and cleaning them. If you go through all that, why not just hand pack them?
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Old 04-12-2020, 10:10 AM   #17
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EZ-lube

When you spin the wheel you can feel if the bearing are loose or dragging. These are not like the old boat Buddy Bearings where there is there is not a good relief for the new grease. I put in enough grease until I see fresh grease coming out the area around the grease zerk. If done properly, you have fresh grease around both bearings. I did not trust it at first so I took the wheel off and checked the bearings. They were is good as when I packed by rolling the bearing in my hand. My sense is more people will actually do it w/ the EZ-lube. With a drive-on ramp, I can do all 4 wheels in an hour.
I check my brakes at the same time. I spin wheel while it is off the ground, pull the emergency cable to stop. Then repeat w/ TV brake. That way I check both systems. I usually tow 6-7K a year, not much wear on brakes IMO w/ a light trailer.
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Old 04-12-2020, 10:39 AM   #18
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If you're naive enough to think this replaces cleaning and repacking your axle bearings go for it. Recommend you carry a complete spindle and bearing set for when the bearings fail on the road. Or your brakes don't work from all the grease inside them.

-- Chuck
ChuckS just what happened to my trailer with 600 miles, Dexter axles. I didn't carry all the parts you mention. I know a lot about Dexter axles and greasing them now. The Penn. RV repair guy said it is required in Penn to have your RV axles inspected ever year. A good thing in my opinion. His price was only $40.00, 2020.
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Old 04-12-2020, 10:56 AM   #19
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Well, this is the drawback of using ez-lube to grease the bearings. Dexter still recommends inspecting the bearings annually (may be overkill) and there is no way to inspect them without removing and cleaning them. If you go through all that, why not just hand pack them?
Like I said earlier, Dexter doesn't know what application the axle will be used for so their instructions are for "the lowest common denominator".

A boat trailer that gets the hubs immersed will probably benefit from annual inspections (especially if dipped in salt water).

A travel or utility trailer that only sees water when driven on a rain covered road, won't have that need.


I wonder how many people were as diligent in checking their brakes and bearings on their older cars and pickups that used the same type of bearings on the non-driven wheels? Bearings were usually serviced only when brakes were "relined" which usually occurred somewhere between 25k and 50k.

Today's wheel bearings are sealed and you CAN'T add any grease. How do you check them? By feel of course. Just like one can do with a trailer wheel if it's properly adjusted from the beginning.

Using the proper grease is also necessary. I still see people using wheel bearing grease so thick in viscosity you could put a pipe in a 5 gallon bucket of it and fly a flag from it. It's so stiff it's more like tar. That's what was used on old Wagon Wheels. Today's greases are more the consistency of soft ice cream.
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