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Old 08-17-2019, 11:28 AM   #1
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Jacking up trailer for storage

I have a single axle Cherokee Wolf Pup that I park on a concrete pad. I'd like to jack it up when not in use so the tires are off the concrete and do not develop flat spots (plus it will make it very easy for bearing maintenance).

I have two 3K jacks with rubber pads on top that curve where they meet the axle and fit perfectly on the axle (photo attached of the left tire and jack). The point of contact of the jack and axle is about two inches away from the u-bolt/leaf spring. Is this okay for long term storage?

Or should I use wood blocks directly under the leaf spring and u-bolts as shown in the attached picture with the red arrow indicating where the blocks and trailer contact point would be?
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Old 08-17-2019, 12:38 PM   #2
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I have never worried about flat spots developing from sitting on any of my trailers. The only time I've seen a flat spot on a tire is if the air leaks out and it goes flat. If your tires are in good shape it just doesn't happen. Many people use their tv only for towing their trailer a few times a year and don't seem to worry about the tv's tires developing flat spots from sitting.
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Old 08-17-2019, 12:57 PM   #3
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If your trailer gets used enough that it doesn't sit for long, it likely doesn't matter. If its sits for many months at a time, its a good idea and Goodyear actually recommends to do that.


https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/tire-storage.aspx
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Old 08-17-2019, 04:23 PM   #4
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The old biasply tires would flat spot unroll driven a ways. New modern tires you don't have to worry about flat spotting. Setting the tires on wood could help to prevent them from drying out.
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Old 08-17-2019, 04:43 PM   #5
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The old biasply tires would flat spot unroll driven a ways. New modern tires you don't have to worry about flat spotting. Setting the tires on wood could help to prevent them from drying out.

Not sure about this. I have a car that has 5 year-old Goodyear Eagle F1 GS-D3 (summer performance) tires on it. It's garaged. If I don't drive it for three months or more, all four tires "thump" noticeably until about 50 miles or so (sooner if it's hot out). I don't know whether this thumping is damaging to the tires, but since discovering this, I move the car 6" every month or so when it's sitting.
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Old 08-17-2019, 04:47 PM   #6
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Some but not like the old tire design. I have 2 old cars with radicals that sit at least 4 months over the winter and only takes a short distance to smooth out. The old truck I had would take about 5 miles to get the thump out of the biasply.
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Old 08-18-2019, 11:52 AM   #7
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If you plan on keeping your wheels off the ground in storage I would put the jack stands under the frame and not the axles. They say not to jack trailer up by the axles for fear of bending them. I would say it could bend the axles with the jack stand under them for a long period of time in storage.
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Old 08-18-2019, 12:08 PM   #8
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We had our 2015 28 BHBE for 6 years and stored interior for 6 months, Nov-May and never one time did we have any problems. I checked when pulling out each May and hadn't lost but 1-2 lbs.
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Old 08-18-2019, 03:42 PM   #9
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No bending the axles

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If you plan on keeping your wheels off the ground in storage I would put the jack stands under the frame and not the axles. They say not to jack trailer up by the axles for fear of bending them. I would say it could bend the axles with the jack stand under them for a long period of time in storage.
You're misinterpreting the warning. The worst thing you could do is jack up the trailer with a single jack right in the center. That maximizes the difference between the upward force and the downward force. And it puts double the force from one jack or jackstand at the center point compared to sharing the load with two outboard.

As I see it, there's no problem with jackstands on the leaf springs OR right next to the leaf springs.

I wonder a little bit about stability. When the trailer is on the ground, you can chock the wheels. When it's on axle stands, how much longitudinal force does it take to move it? For that matter, how much lateral force to knock the stands over?
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Old 08-18-2019, 03:58 PM   #10
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Agreed. There is no issue putting the jack stands under the axle as shown in the picture.
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You're misinterpreting the warning. The worst thing you could do is jack up the trailer with a single jack right in the center. That maximizes the difference between the upward force and the downward force. And it puts double the force from one jack or jackstand at the center point compared to sharing the load with two outboard.

As I see it, there's no problem with jackstands on the leaf springs OR right next to the leaf springs.

I wonder a little bit about stability. When the trailer is on the ground, you can chock the wheels. When it's on axle stands, how much longitudinal force does it take to move it? For that matter, how much lateral force to knock the stands over?
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Old 08-18-2019, 04:13 PM   #11
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I checked the trailer for stability after putting the two jacks on the axle by the tires, and much to my surprise if felt rock solid with no wiggle. But then I guess it shouldn't have been too surprising since I have a very short trailer (16' living space length) and the trailer frame has four stabilizers of which I had all four deployed. I think without the stabilizers down I wouldn't want to have anyone in the trailer, but with them down it felt as stable as when the wheels are firmly on the ground.

As for chalking the tires, I had the trailer raised just enough to clear the tires from the concrete, and then wedged the chalks under the tires (I have four chalks, one I place in the front and back of each tire regardless the grade). That probably doesn't accomplish much with the trailer raised, but I did it anyway. ��
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Old 08-18-2019, 04:19 PM   #12
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Underneath...

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I checked the trailer for stability after putting the two jacks on the axle by the tires, and much to my surprise if felt rock solid with no wiggle. But then I guess it shouldn't have been too surprising since I have a very short trailer (16' living space length) and the trailer frame has four stabilizers of which I had all four deployed. I think without the stabilizers down I wouldn't want to have anyone in the trailer, but with them down it felt as stable as when the wheels are firmly on the ground.

As for chalking the tires, I had the trailer raised just enough to clear the tires from the concrete, and then wedged the chalks under the tires (I have four chalks, one I place in the front and back of each tire regardless the grade). That probably doesn't accomplish much with the trailer raised, but I did it anyway. ��
Well, Be careful if you're underneath with a really long wrench or bar, pulling on something. It's not like a car where you can always leave two wheels on the ground.

(Come to think of it, when we were kids in the 1960s, we used milk crates to hold up the car instead of axle stands. They had a much wider base of support.)
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Old 08-19-2019, 09:28 AM   #13
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Folly of youth

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Well, Be careful if you're underneath with a really long wrench or bar, pulling on something. It's not like a car where you can always leave two wheels on the ground.

(Come to think of it, when we were kids in the 1960s, we used milk crates to hold up the car instead of axle stands. They had a much wider base of support.)
I had my first car, a 1953 Ford in the back yard up on cement blocks. Two high under each tire. Working on trans. Got tired and hungry. Went inside and while eating my sandwich saw the car fall off the blocks as they sank into the soft ground. Lesson learned.
Now will not even change mower blades without jack stands. Play safe. 👍👍
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Old 08-19-2019, 03:33 PM   #14
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ST trailer tires are designed with that already in mind, that they may sit in one spot for an extended amount of time unlike a car, also car tires are made for a steerable axle where as trailers are not. Tires these days just don't get that old flat spot and thump, thump like in days of old. If you do jack up the whole frame I would see if the manufacturer can tell you recommended jack points for supporting the whole frame with all tires off the ground. You don't want any frame twist or misalignment. And you already know to never support any of the trailer weight on the axle tube with the jack.
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Old 08-19-2019, 03:45 PM   #15
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ST trailer tires are designed with that already in mind, that they may sit in one spot for an extended amount of time unlike a car, also car tires are made for a steerable axle where as trailers are not. Tires these days just don't get that old flat spot and thump, thump like in days of old. If you do jack up the whole frame I would see if the manufacturer can tell you recommended jack points for supporting the whole frame with all tires off the ground. You don't want any frame twist or misalignment. And you already know to never support any of the trailer weight on the axle tube with the jack.
Then why does Goodyear recommend storing them off the ground for long term storage?
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Old 08-19-2019, 04:27 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by rlh1957 View Post
ST trailer tires are designed with that already in mind, that they may sit in one spot for an extended amount of time unlike a car, also car tires are made for a steerable axle where as trailers are not. Tires these days just don't get that old flat spot and thump, thump like in days of old. If you do jack up the whole frame I would see if the manufacturer can tell you recommended jack points for supporting the whole frame with all tires off the ground. You don't want any frame twist or misalignment. And you already know to never support any of the trailer weight on the axle tube with the jack.
I am glad I am not the only one that knows that putting jack stands under the axles for support is not a good ideal.
I am not a tire expert so I dont know what's right or wrong.
But of course everyone will have their own opinion and until they have been there and done that will they know the right and wrong way to do things.
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Old 08-19-2019, 04:37 PM   #17
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Thank you. With all the info I have received previously, plus what you just provided, I will leave the trailer tires on the ground (actually, I'll put a Lynx leveler under each to keep them off the concrete). If the trailer is going to sit for much more than three months I can always bottle jack the trailer, one side at a time, and rotate the tires a quarter or half turn, then put the trailer back down. That should avoid any long term strain on any one point of the tires for sure. ��
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Old 08-19-2019, 04:38 PM   #18
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Does anyone give specifics on what is considered long term storage? a month, 2, 3 6 months a year?
The longest mine has been parked has been 4 months on the concrete drive. Most years only for 3 years. Never any issues, premature wear, blowouts, separations or rough ride. But we all have our decisions to make and live with.
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Old 08-19-2019, 05:01 PM   #19
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I am glad I am not the only one that knows that putting jack stands under the axles for support is not a good ideal.
I am not a tire expert so I dont know what's right or wrong.
But of course everyone will have their own opinion and until they have been there and done that will they know the right and wrong way to do things.
You do realize that where that jack stand is placed is right next to where the springs mount right? The warning for not jacking up by the axle is to prevent someone from jacking in the center of the axle.
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Old 08-19-2019, 05:03 PM   #20
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I will leave the trailer tires on the ground (actually, I'll put a Lynx leveler under each to keep them off the concrete). If the trailer is going to sit for much more than three months I can always bottle jack the trailer, one side at a time, and rotate the tires a quarter or half turn, then put the trailer back down. That should avoid any long term strain on any one point of the tires for sure. ��
You are better off leaving them on the concrete or a piece of wood instead of a lynx leveler. There is nothing wrong with concrete.
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