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Old 10-03-2019, 10:52 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by Funengineer View Post
Since it has been brought up, where do you store your portable propane grill and extra tank if you use one?
Both live in the truck bed, exposed to the elements and not locked up.

It's actually been nice- we've had impromptu fires at friend's house because I often have the firepit with me.
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Old 10-03-2019, 12:15 PM   #62
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This has been a very informative thread. I appreciate everyone’s involvement.

Since it has been brought up, where do you store your portable propane grill and extra tank if you use one?

I intend to store my pit and extra tank in my pickup bed when traveling. I have a fiberglass camper shell.
Use one of the on-board 30# bottles.

Fire pit gets thrown in the bed of the truck when we decided to take it along.
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Old 10-03-2019, 07:37 PM   #63
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We have a Little Red Campfire in a Can. We really like it and it puts out a reasonable amount of heat - if that's what you're looking for. I really like a wood fire but many California campgrounds restrict real wood fire because of the fire danger. My only negative thought on the campfire in a can is that when you turn the gas up to get more heat, the sound of the burners is a bit less than aesthetically pleasing. From my experience at friends propane campfires, they all have that sound at some point.
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Old 10-07-2019, 07:45 AM   #64
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Here's where we mostly carry ours. Sometimes on the back of the truck as well.Click image for larger version

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Old 10-07-2019, 09:16 AM   #65
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The Fire Dancer is a little smaller in diameter than the others, (I have the one from Lowes in my back yard), but it performs equally as well. It comes with a lid that screws down tight so no chance of spillage of the vermiculite (not sure that's what it is, but it's what it looks like). I also purchased the ceramic logs which give it more of an esthetic look when using. They also live under the cover when storing. Like many others I use my low pressure outlet on my trailer, so I don't have to carry extra bottles. I've never had an issue carrying it in the compartment under my Fifth Wheel. It just lives there till we want to use it. Like others have said, much easier to use and carry than firewood. Doesn't replace the entire experience since you don't have the smell, and there is no doing the "Smoke Dance" since there is no smoke.
We also have been able to use our "Tonka Pie/Hobo Pie" cookers on it with great success since the heat output is more even.
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Old 10-07-2019, 09:42 AM   #66
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It's not propane and puts out no heat, but I have an electric fire that was originally meant for theatrics. On those "I really want a fire, but it's still 88 degrees at 9:00pm" summer nights, it provides a realistic alternative. Looks real enough, and throws that flickering fire-looking glow on surrounding surfaces.



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Old 10-07-2019, 02:47 PM   #67
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Ever since I was in scouts many many years ago I've always been a believer in camping = nice fire. Though this seems like in may be something to consider down the road. Now a days when its time to build a fire while camping/cooking/fireplace/etc the conversation seems to go like this:

Wife: Its a nice night for a fire.
Me: OK.
Wife: just don't make it to big like you always do.
Me: Ok.
Wife: why are you putting so much wood on the fire?
Me: That just the kindling/paper to get it started.
Wife: Why is the fire so large?
Me: Thats just the kindling/paper burning.
Wife: Why are you adding more wood to the fire?
Me: Need something other that paper/kindling to count as a fire.
Every 15 minutes.....
Wife: why are you adding more wood?
Me: to try and keep the fire burning....
After an hour or two.....
Wife: its getting late, but you put too much wood on the fire
Me: (looking at the 1 log barely burning) Don't worry, thats why they invented Coors lite/Budweiser (fire goes out)

At least with a propane fire ring this conversation becomes:
Wife: Its a nice night for a fire.
Me: Propane tank is hooked up, you turn the knob and push the igniter. (continue drinking something other than Coors lite/Budweiser)

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Old 10-07-2019, 06:42 PM   #68
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I bought the larger Outland 883 Mega firepit and modified it to work from the on-board propane disconnect. (Also modified both of my bbq's to use the trailer's propane, so no more carrying extra for me.)

Absolutely love being able to have a fire when wood fires are not allowed due to restrictions.

I loosely followed this review for the propane conversion.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-r...SIN=B073SMX1TC

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Old 10-07-2019, 06:47 PM   #69
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Propane

We take our propane fireplace with us all the time. Just turn it on and you have an instant fire and no smoke. It's great for popping popcorn and even some cooking. It's amazing how many people walking by, stop and ask us questions about it.
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Old 10-07-2019, 06:58 PM   #70
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Stoooopy question of the day...so here it goes: can you "cook" over these propane fire pits? Like marshmallows and such? Invariably doing smores someone (me) will drop their marshmallow into the fire which is no biggie for a wood fire. What about these units?
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Old 10-07-2019, 07:03 PM   #71
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Originally Posted by jd4010 View Post
Stoooopy question of the day...so here it goes: can you "cook" over these propane fire pits? Like marshmallows and such? Invariably doing smores someone (me) will drop their marshmallow into the fire which is no biggie for a wood fire. What about these units?
I answered my thoughts on this in post #9.
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Old 10-07-2019, 07:03 PM   #72
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We have wrapped up a meal in aluminum foil and done quite nicely. Propane fireplaces are really made just like a grill. I suggest minimizing spills and drips as much as possible, but don't worry about them and just enjoy the evening.
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Old 10-07-2019, 07:30 PM   #73
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can you "cook" over these propane fire pits? Like marshmallows and such? Invariably doing smores someone (me) will drop their marshmallow into the fire which is no biggie for a wood fire. What about these units?
all is not lost... lots depends on what you dropped in and what the fire media is...

mine is lava rock... most grease and such that drops in just burns off... the next day, if something on the rock looks bad, pick the rock up and toss it...

For those that use metal logs... they can be cleaned if necessary. Vermiculite? Scoop out the spoiled area and toss it. New vermiculite is cheap.
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Old 10-07-2019, 07:33 PM   #74
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We use an Outland Fire Bowl we picked up at Costco a couple years ago.
It’s 19” and we run it off an extra 20# tank we use for our table top BBQ.
It throws a great heat, nice and clean for the occasional hot dog or marshmallow for the kids too.
We’ve even cooked over it in a pinch with a grill I made from heavy wire mesh I picked up and cut the size of the top.
We like the propane as a backup in the event of fire bans during peak fire season ,
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Old 10-07-2019, 07:55 PM   #75
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We have the Outland that we bought at Costco and use an extra 20lb tank. I did buy a quick connect hose, but never used it, as I want to make sure I know when the tank is empty and no impact to the trailer tanks.

One question I have never found the answer to is in the instructions it says maximum 20lb propane tank. I don't know why you can not use 30lbs. I asked a couple stores and even called the company. Nobody could explain why and just said to follow the instructions to stay safe. Anyone have any idea why a 30lb would be dangerous?
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Old 10-07-2019, 08:04 PM   #76
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I use our Outland with. 20# tank while traveling but I another on my deck at home and the one from the RV finds it’s way to the cottage in the off season.
Those two both run from 30# tanks for a couple years now with no issues.
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Old 10-07-2019, 10:52 PM   #77
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Fire bans? Is this not a fire?
When Fire Bans are in place, propane fires are exempt every place I've been because there are no sparks.
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Old 10-08-2019, 04:19 AM   #78
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We use a Outland 19" Firebowl. I modified the LP connection with a quick connect so I can use the on-board tanks (preferred) or we can still use the regulator with our separate 5lb tank if it requires being further out than our LP lines allow. I picked up the carry bag for it and the firebowl and hoses all fit in it nicely. It lives in the back of our truck along with the LP tank.

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Old 10-08-2019, 06:57 AM   #79
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I use the little red campfire. It’s lid clamps on and can’t cone lose during travel. The hose wraps around the base and is inside the lid. It takes up less space than one $12 bundle of campground approved firewood. It weighs less then as well. Because the lid is locked on it holds the sooty ceramic logs inside and there’s no black smudges from it bumping against something in our basement.

We choose to Cary one 20lb propane tanks to feed both our grill and the campfire. The tank lasts for at least 10 hours of camp fires and 3 or 4 grilling. We run the fire at a medium setting. We have a toy hauler with a party deck. When it is ungodly hot and humid we place the propane pot on a fireproof base on the deck and light the fire and sit in the garage with the screen down to keep the bugs out and run the AC. So we get the ambiance and still stay cool and comfortable.

The bottom of the base does not get hot. At low setting we sit it on the mat under the awning. If we want a large fire then we put on a fireproof base to be sure we’re insulated and pull the awning back. The rising heat at low setting has never overheated the awning. I wouldn’t chance it at the high setting as it can crank a fairly hot fire.

We usually only sit out for an hour or two as we go to a lot of events or sit seeing when camping. So the time spent building and damping a wood fire wouldn’t be worth the effort. We turn off the valve, wait twenty minutes for it to cool and pack it up. Off to bed not smelling of smoke. The lack of smoke is the best part for me as I have sensitive eyes and can’t near enough a wood fire to feel the warmth without the smoke driving me away.

Usually I just leave it outside and pack it in the morning. No one has bothered it if I feel comfortable leaving the zero gravity chairs out, then I feel comfortable leaving it out. I’m sure I will get burned (pun intended) someday, but then again, my security cameras might just let me burn the thief if it should happen.

So to sum up: it’s easy and lighter to pack, cheaper to use unless you buy firewood by the cord and are able to use foreign wood at the campground (most of our pa parks are restricting because of lantern flies), and much more flexible in the placement of the fire. I wouldn’t go back to a wood fire.
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Old 10-08-2019, 07:47 AM   #80
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I'm a convert!

As others have stated a fire is an essential component of camping providing light, heat and late night snacks! There is something therapeutic about staring into a fire.

On a recent outing my brother in law pulled out one of these. Inside I scoffed at the thought of sitting around what is essentially a poorly burning barbecue complete with 70's era lava rocks!

Here's what happened. It was early in the season, quite cool and started to rain at about 7:00pm. He shutdown the fire with a turn of the valve, put the locking lid on and effortlessly moved the pit under his awning/add-a-room. We followed suit with our chairs. Nice and cozy, evening saved.

Here are the bonuses:
1) Exempt from fire bans
2) no bad chair with smoke blowing at you constantly
3) adjustable flame so if you just need ambiance=low flame, fire it up if you are cold (puts out 54000BTUs)
4) cheaper than buying campfire wood (Provincial Parks want $8/bag for sometimes green softwood and we will often burn two or three bags a night. Costco fills my tank for $9.99 and on medium flame I get three nights)

I had already purchased a wood fire bowl from Lowe's in anticipation of the upcoming season but returned it and for not much more got the Aurora from Wally Mart https://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/185-steel-gas-firebowl/6000197491776

Travels in the box it came in in the bed of my TV. Can't believe it but I really like it.
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