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Old 01-19-2021, 01:14 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by corn18 View Post
I definitely think a little poo would come out if we were towing in snow or ice. And pulling over to the side of the road might be worse. I flipped my 2WD truck (it was actually one wheel drive - no diff lock or traction control of any kind) when we hit some black ice on an overpass going 42 mph. We climbed out of the truck and immediately another car went sliding by sideways and hit the guard rail about 100 yds down the road. Yikes! Found out later that day that someone was killed when he wrecked in the same spot and got out of his car and got hit by another out of control car.
Never get out of your car if in a wreck (unless car is on fire). It's the only protection you have until traffic is stopped or a semi pulls up and shields your car.

Even if someone hits your car it can mean the difference between just hurt or dead. (unless you are Chuck Norris )
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Old 01-21-2021, 04:29 PM   #42
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Former Highway Engineer here (who signed speed limit changes and curve warning speeds). That 35 MPH curve warning is for nighttime wet conditions where your tires are in good condition and your visibility is not impaired by the rain, truck spray, etc. (That's why you can typically take it at 40 MPH on a sunny day.) Posted warning speeds do NOT apply to snow and ice conditions and if you only slow down to the posted warning speed under those conditions you're likely to end up in the ditch or over the cliff, with or without a trailer.
In all situations what keeps you under control is the friction between your tires and the road. The best rule when driving is that you can use friction safely to either accelerate, decelerate, or turn, pick one. If you try to decelerate and turn or accelerate and turn at the same time you're asking for trouble. Especially true when there's snow or ice.
I have chains for both my TV and my TT. They're still brand new after six years because I park rather than pull when it's snowing. They're only with me for if I find myself in an unpredicted snowstorm, and then my plan is to use them only until I find a safe place to pull over. Take care out there.
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Old 01-21-2021, 05:36 PM   #43
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Former Highway Engineer here (who signed speed limit changes and curve warning speeds). That 35 MPH curve warning is for nighttime wet conditions where your tires are in good condition and your visibility is not impaired by the rain, truck spray, etc. (That's why you can typically take it at 40 MPH on a sunny day.) Posted warning speeds do NOT apply to snow and ice conditions and if you only slow down to the posted warning speed under those conditions you're likely to end up in the ditch or over the cliff, with or without a trailer.
In all situations what keeps you under control is the friction between your tires and the road. The best rule when driving is that you can use friction safely to either accelerate, decelerate, or turn, pick one. If you try to decelerate and turn or accelerate and turn at the same time you're asking for trouble. Especially true when there's snow or ice.
I have chains for both my TV and my TT. They're still brand new after six years because I park rather than pull when it's snowing. They're only with me for if I find myself in an unpredicted snowstorm, and then my plan is to use them only until I find a safe place to pull over. Take care out there.
Thanks for that info!

You would think most of that would come from common sense.
But for some people you have to spell it out. And then they still cant read it.

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Old 01-21-2021, 06:08 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
Never get out of your car if in a wreck (unless car is on fire). It's the only protection you have until traffic is stopped or a semi pulls up and shields your car.

Even if someone hits your car it can mean the difference between just hurt or dead. (unless you are Chuck Norris )
It'll still mean hurt or dead, just in the other direction. Try hard not to hit people with your car, but try to not hit Chuck Norris like your life depends on it.
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Old 01-21-2021, 07:17 PM   #45
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Yup
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Old 01-21-2021, 08:32 PM   #46
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commen sence

commen sence that went out the window .

I would of weighted an chained my trailer.
as truck driver for the state we drove rain shine sleet or snow or dead of night that was tricky enouf.

to the men & women who served
thank you for your service


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Old 01-21-2021, 08:35 PM   #47
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How do you like that ford 3500 6.7
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Old 01-21-2021, 09:01 PM   #48
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A lot of armchair quarterbacking going on in this thread. Did anyone watch the follow-up video that was in the upper right at the end?

He states the snow started about 15 miles prior to the crash, and he was slowing down before approaching the turn. He believes he was doing 33 at the time he lost control (still too fast for conditions.) He was driving a Ford 450 4x4 and had placed it into 4WD Hi at the very beginning. He acknowledges there were mistakes, and that he should have looked harder to find a place to pull off. Not many places along that route for a 65' setup (22' crew cab truck plus 43' fifth wheel) plus the video was taken by his wife's dashcam in their 4 door Jeep.
They are new to full timing (started about 6 weeks prior to crash) and it was his inexperience that lead to the decisions he made that day. They were traveling to their next site because the campground they were at closed for the season earlier that day.
There's no need for some of the names that are being thrown at him, as fellow RV'ers we should be thankful that no one was hurt, insurance is going to fix the truck and still deciding about the RV.
Side note, AAA refused their service call due to the size of their rig, they had to call for two wreckers to pull them off the mountain.
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Old 01-21-2021, 09:12 PM   #49
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Thanks for that info!

You would think most of that would come from common sense.
But for some people you have to spell it out. And then they still cant read it.

I'd pay extra in my taxes just to see our State post this sign on our mountain highways.
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Old 01-21-2021, 10:12 PM   #50
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Never Again

I swore that I would never tow our 5th wheel on snow and ice. We were on a tight schedule as we headed for a seasonal job in Yellowstone National Park. The weather station reported that this storm should head North before reaching the Black Hills. The storm did NOT head North and soon we were alone on I-90 and in for a slow white-knuckle ride. I was never so happy to reach Gillett Wyoming where the gates were down closing I-90 to any travel for 14 hours. We were lucky that day. A few days later we were digging snow out a camp site in Yellowstone.
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Old 01-21-2021, 10:25 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Sharon455 View Post
A lot of armchair quarterbacking going on in this thread. Did anyone watch the follow-up video that was in the upper right at the end?

He states the snow started about 15 miles prior to the crash, and he was slowing down before approaching the turn. He believes he was doing 33 at the time he lost control (still too fast for conditions.) He was driving a Ford 450 4x4 and had placed it into 4WD Hi at the very beginning. He acknowledges there were mistakes, and that he should have looked harder to find a place to pull off. Not many places along that route for a 65' setup (22' crew cab truck plus 43' fifth wheel) plus the video was taken by his wife's dashcam in their 4 door Jeep.
They are new to full timing (started about 6 weeks prior to crash) and it was his inexperience that lead to the decisions he made that day. They were traveling to their next site because the campground they were at closed for the season earlier that day.
There's no need for some of the names that are being thrown at him, as fellow RV'ers we should be thankful that no one was hurt, insurance is going to fix the truck and still deciding about the RV.
Side note, AAA refused their service call due to the size of their rig, they had to call for two wreckers to pull them off the mountain.
AGREE totally. I donít know this route at all, but from looks of it, I doubt there were any truck stops, or places to safely pull off the road, in previous 5-10 miles.
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Old 01-21-2021, 11:13 PM   #52
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Was going to fast down hill for that truck and trailer.

What I see in most of these videos is a driver who is more concerned with the traffic behind them then they are with driving a safe speed.
I must admit that I've been guilty of feeling like I'm holding traffic up because I'm going slow due to road conditions. After seeing this? They'll just have to wait.
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Old 01-22-2021, 08:00 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by Sharon455 View Post
A lot of armchair quarterbacking going on in this thread. Did anyone watch the follow-up video that was in the upper right at the end?

He states the snow started about 15 miles prior to the crash, and he was slowing down before approaching the turn. He believes he was doing 33 at the time he lost control (still too fast for conditions.) He was driving a Ford 450 4x4 and had placed it into 4WD Hi at the very beginning. He acknowledges there were mistakes, and that he should have looked harder to find a place to pull off. Not many places along that route for a 65' setup (22' crew cab truck plus 43' fifth wheel) plus the video was taken by his wife's dashcam in their 4 door Jeep.
They are new to full timing (started about 6 weeks prior to crash) and it was his inexperience that lead to the decisions he made that day. They were traveling to their next site because the campground they were at closed for the season earlier that day.
There's no need for some of the names that are being thrown at him, as fellow RV'ers we should be thankful that no one was hurt, insurance is going to fix the truck and still deciding about the RV.
Side note, AAA refused their service call due to the size of their rig, they had to call for two wreckers to pull them off the mountain.
This is how most accidents happen: a combination of events leading up to the accident. Got in late the night before, "had" to leave campground, clear until it wasn't, just going to get to next spot, couldn't pull over, people behind him, and going to fast. Looks like he crested a hill and gained some momentum past the peak. Not playing it extra cautious. Even in good weather I normally cut the gas just before the crest and coast over a little slower than normal to make it easier on the brakes.

I've faced this problem, potential of snow coming down on the pass, when trying to go east from southwest Colorado in early Oct. The first time I checked all the forecasts, it looked clear, and headed out on east on 160. I had no snow during driving, but it had recently snowed on Wolf's Pass, but the pavement was plowed and mostly dry.

The second time there were numerous disturbances producing snow in Colorado and I was way down near Mesa Verde NP the second week of Oct so I just headed down to I40. Cost me several hours on a long trip back to PA but it was worth it to get out of the mtns and not worry about snow.

However, almost any time you drive in the mtns you face the risk of a snow squaw going over a high pass. Hopefully, I'll remember this case and be extra cautious, like pulling over and waiting, or driving maybe 20 mph.
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Old 01-22-2021, 10:17 AM   #54
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Truck Driver with over 40 years experience . Sign says it all "carry brains" rv's have no business driving in conditions like that! Proof is in that video! Good reason for RV license and schooling for rv drivers. Could have gotten into that semi and been real bad! Semi completely innocent, driver of rv, dead! Compare cost of pulling over and being late with cost for trailer and truck and increase of insurance for years, along with the mental image imbedded on that poor child!
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Old 01-22-2021, 11:13 AM   #55
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Towing in snow

im sorry for my comments
hate to see a brother or sister RVer get in a wreck .
i know i freek out if there a scratch on my rig.

i know i dont have all the answer but some kind of training and equipment on bord such as chains or sock's
iv all ways said go big on the truck guess thats why i have Old Black Betty 3500 Dodge with tool box's for special equipment like sock's.Chains

that kid was gut renching .
she should of never gotten out of that jeep that could of caused another crash.
i bet Good Sam ant picking up the bill there ..

I have wondered why parks dont have a over night lot .
even a day use lot ?

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Old 01-22-2021, 12:05 PM   #56
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Every time I go up 77 I have towable RV's pass me going up Fancy Gap Hill doing way over the speed limit. and that road has TV screens for speed limit signs that they change based on conditions.


Why? "Because the diesel pickup they own can" is only reason I can think of.
going up that hill is always a testosterone driven race track.


But O do enjoy waving to them when they get stopped in the speed trap at top
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Old 01-22-2021, 03:21 PM   #57
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tow pro lol

i roll down the window and give a big YAhoooooo lmao ..
i had one of them tundrazzzzz pass me it was smelling hot pulling a V nose
cought up a waaze down the road gave um a beep on the horne & a YahOOooo
truper waved to me
i lm*ao
i like your hair did it take you long to fix it lol



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Old 01-25-2021, 05:11 PM   #58
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I lived in Colorado for 26 years until March 2020, and pulled many trailers in snow through Colorado, Wyoming and Montana over the years, for both work and pleasure. I always took my time and chained up if I felt at all uncomfortable. It's possible and even safe if you take steps to manage the risks, and know when to stop.
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