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Old 03-15-2021, 06:44 PM   #41
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I will never use a plug on a vehicle that gets up to road speed, same for fix-a-flat. But I have used plugs on farm implements and construction equipment. I carry plug kits in a sandwich bag in my off road toys and my 78' CJ5 but I do also have good spares and jacks and tools in the CJ5 and Polaris Ranger.
I started patching tire tubes back with the old Camel vulcanizing hot patches. Repairing flats on three piece wheels when I was a teenager.
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Old 03-15-2021, 06:57 PM   #42
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Using a plug to get you out of the woods Iím good with. I mentioned earlier about my tech son and tire repair. Turns out now the dealership he works at has now reinforced a no plug no patch resolve. New tire is going on that wheel.
Sorry but I will make my own decisions on a tire patch or replacement. I seen the tire patch salesman come to my dad's service station in the early 70s with plugs all over one tire on his car. I've used plugs every since. I like the inside patch/ plug the best.

I had bought brand new tires for my trailer and had them on a week when I got a nail in one. Tire dealer tried to pull the we don't do inside patch/plug you'll have to buy a new tire. So I told him the story of the plug salesman, he went to his desk drawer and pulled one out and patched it.
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Old 03-15-2021, 08:11 PM   #43
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Just curious - WMTire - I've used the Stop & Go tire plugger kit for emergencies on our cars and even my motorcycle on a couple occasions (some times it's the only option...) What is your opinion on this product - better? same? BTW, I'm not saying it is the permanent solution, just maybe better for a temporary fix.
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Old 03-15-2021, 08:28 PM   #44
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dont even think about it

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Originally Posted by Jimbo K. View Post
I was in the tire business during a previous life in the '80s, and your view is consistent with ours back then. Because of those views I've always been reluctant to even buy tire plugging kits, much less use them.

Glad I've got good spares for all my vehicles -- except the Gold Wing. At the risk of straying a bit from RV topics, what do you recommend for motorcycle tire punctures, at least to get the bike to the closest (which still could be a considerable distance) bike shop?



As for the philosophy of "I've never had a problem doing [x]" when [x] runs counter to prevailing evidence, wisdom, recommendations, or plain common sense, my response is, "Anyone who's ever had a problem doing [x] at some point prior would have been able to say they've never had a problem."
Scare yourself sometime. I recently changed a tire on my Concours. The tire was very low on tread and due to be changed so I did, and on a whim, I cut the old carcass in two to see how much rubber was left between the road and the inside of the tire (wall thickness). About 1/8 inch, .125 of an inch. For that reason I recommend changing bike tires early and never, not ever, plug them.
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Old 03-15-2021, 08:44 PM   #45
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Plugs in tires

Well I have always carried a plug kit in my emergency took kit but have never used it on a vehicle or trailer tire. Iíve used them on lawn type tires over the years . BUT I HAVE A TRICK that I have used for as long as I can remember. I have always had a boat with trailer as well as company boat trailers. I always have mounted spare tires. Unfortunately there are a lot of spare trailer tires stolen at the boat ramps. SO WHAT I DO IS :: I take a plug cut 1/4 ď off and superglue 2 of them on the tire.1 goes in the treads sticking out a little and the second goes near the sidewall that I scuff up around before glueing it on. Iíll Dab
A little glue around them for a few days to make sure they are on good. My thought behind it was even a thief doesnít want a plugged tire and when there are good ones on the next trailer. Just my 2 cents worth.
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Old 03-15-2021, 08:46 PM   #46
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Lots of opinions and people with remote experience. Lots of anecdotal stories. Does anybody know of any real world science out there? Failure rates with different products, etc.? I donít mean to denigrate anybodyís experiences or qualifications. Just wondering if there are any real world studies.
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Old 03-15-2021, 09:24 PM   #47
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Tire plugs always worked great for me. Safety is a relative thing.
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Old 03-15-2021, 09:57 PM   #48
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Lots of opinions and people with remote experience. Lots of anecdotal stories. Does anybody know of any real world science out there? Failure rates with different products, etc.? I donít mean to denigrate anybodyís experiences or qualifications. Just wondering if there are any real world studies.
Real world testing and studies have been done ever since the first plug for tires showed up. Tire companies, tire research organizations all have tested plugged tires and recommend AGAINST using them.

Just remember, a proper repair will allow the tire to achieve the full mileage it was going to get. Plugs have a high failure rate and when plugged tires fail people often blame "cheap tires.

There'll never be an "outside in" plug type repair on any of my tires.

Those that think they're OK, hope your luck holds.
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Old 03-15-2021, 10:03 PM   #49
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Just curious - WMTire - I've used the Stop & Go tire plugger kit for emergencies on our cars and even my motorcycle on a couple occasions (some times it's the only option...) What is your opinion on this product - better? same? BTW, I'm not saying it is the permanent solution, just maybe better for a temporary fix.
This is just a rivet type "cork" that is installed from the outside of the tire. Not bonded to the tire and relies on the tire squeezing in around the plug to hold it in place.

They've been around since at least the early 60's when gas stations still repaired tires.

Reputable tire stores won't touch them.
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Old 03-16-2021, 07:48 AM   #50
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While working in a tire store, I was always taught to plug *and* patch. The tire was removed from the rim, and the the plug was a round rubber plug, loaded with glue, inserted from the outside or inside. It was then ground flush with the inside of the tire and a patch applied over the puncture area. The plug and glue sealed the belts from water, the patch prevented air leakage.
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Old 03-16-2021, 08:11 AM   #51
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Longer term members may have read many previous posts from me railing against using string type tire plugs that are inserted from the outside of the tire.

I have shown reasons why you always want to have a tire dismounted to check for damage as well as tire plugs can lead to belt separation as pictured below.

I know that there will be members posting that they have used tire plugs since the first pair of tires came off Noah's Ark with nary a problem.....but that doesn't make it a proper or even a safe way to repair tires.

But as the thread title goes, I love when people plug their tires. If/when it ruins the tire, or the tire blows out.... I get to make a sale, as I did on this one pictured. Cha-ching.[ATTTACH]249234[/ATTACH]
Just checkin ( tonge in cheek ) that set of tires off Noahs Ark....were they " Castle Rocks " ? n what kind of a hitch did he use on the trailer when haulin it to the marina ?
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Old 03-16-2021, 08:45 AM   #52
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I carry the proper type plugs for radials, just in case, but like others would head right on over to get it patched properly. Never use rubber plugs with a steel belted tire, they will get sliced in half in no time flat, always use the gooey rubber coated rope ones.

I once had to plug the inner tire on my old Dually, it was at home when I found the tire low and found and plugged the hole. I was going to take it in the next week and promptly forgot about it. 40K miles and no leaks, so must have done it right Done right with the proper plug and they can last the life of the tire, but I would say only those who have done tire repairs on hundreds if not thousands of tires would know how to do it properly, and even then there is no guarantee it will be good. Patching makes perfect.

I have a Kubota compact tractor, the rear wheels are massive and not very easy to work on. Sprung a leak, found it, plugged it, and 15-16 years now, still holds air. With a backhoe mounted it weighs about 4000 pounds too.
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Old 03-16-2021, 09:15 AM   #53
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I've used plugs, patches, and have those plug/patches Titan Mike shows. It really depends on what the problem is. When you have a nice straight hole created by a nail, or screw, with no cord/belt damage, and not to close to the sidewall, I've had good luck with plugs. That being said, all plugs are not the same. I use the brown fiber type plugs from "Safety Seal". I very rarely have a leak, and they will last the life of the tire. I also check them after installation, and periodically down the road. The black, (I don't know the difference, different material), ones will almost always redevelop a leak. If you have a hole that is jagged, or long, plugs just aren't going to cut it. In this category are also the holes where the puncturing item has taken a roundabout path from the outside to the inside. A plugger tool will simply not follow the path, and you'll actually be making the matter worse by trying to plug it. If you can find the inner puncture, and the casing has not been damaged, you can usually patch it from the inside with success. Sometimes the plug/patches will work in that situation if you can follow the original hole. I use the plug/patches when you get closer to the sidewall. I've actually used them in the sidewall with some success, but obviously that is only for a temporary measure. Most tire shops will not take the chance on many of these types of repair because of the liability involved. I do not take chances on my Truck/fifth wheel rig. Truthfully, I haven't had much of an issue because I spend bigger dollars on tires that are more puncture resistant, and I'm not afraid to replace them when in doubt. I live on dirt roads, and the nails seem to grow in the road. Worn tires are much more prone to punctures, than tires with good tread. I would never plug a trailer tire. They are already prone to problems with delamination, and the damage done when they come apart is just not worth it.
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Old 03-16-2021, 09:39 AM   #54
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While working in a tire store, I was always taught to plug *and* patch. The tire was removed from the rim, and the the plug was a round rubber plug, loaded with glue, inserted from the outside or inside. It was then ground flush with the inside of the tire and a patch applied over the puncture area. The plug and glue sealed the belts from water, the patch prevented air leakage.
That's the method that's been taught since I started back in 1961. Todays repair materials have made it easier with both plug and patch combined in a single item. These repair units work as long as the penetrating object goes through the tread within a few degrees of perpendicular. If the angle is greater than specified then you have to use a separate "stem" and patch as you described.

Sadly, the "Right Way" takes more time so lots of people think the "Good Enough" method is the way to go.

In many ways I'd prefer to go to a tire shop that charges for tire repair than one that provides free repairs. Since those who are doing it for free aren't making any money on the free repair will they really take the time and use the proper materials and methods? Before I retired it was well known in the industry that a large, well known, tire marketer was using the quick and dirty outside-in plug for their "Free" tire repairs. They never dismounted the tire either to see if there was internal damage.

A story to illustrate why dismounting is so important.

Back in the late 80's I was in one of our stores in Missoula, MT when a fisherman came in with a flat tire. On the outside of the tread there was small piece of metal visible that looked like a nail with the head worn off.

Since our company's policy was to dismount all flats and repair from the inside, off the tire came. SURPRISE! This piece of metal looking like the remains of a nail turned out being a piece of fence wire about 8" long. It had cut a neat radiused groove in the sidewall of the tire exposing cords and cutting completely through one layer.

THAT's why all tires got dismounted before we repaired them.
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Old 03-16-2021, 09:59 AM   #55
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I have a Kubota compact tractor, the rear wheels are massive and not very easy to work on. Sprung a leak, found it, plugged it, and 15-16 years now, still holds air. With a backhoe mounted it weighs about 4000 pounds too.
Tractors and other off-road vehicle tires are often plugged.

Big difference though is the tire pressures used and top speeds.

18-20 psi versus a minimum of 35 psi in most cars/light trucks and speeds in the 30's versus up to 80 mph (legal).
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Old 03-16-2021, 10:08 AM   #56
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Here's some interesting reading on how to accomplish a proper tire repair.

https://techtirerepairs.com/wp-conte...nglepg_web.pdf

These are repairs endorsed by the tire manufacturers themselves.
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Old 08-16-2021, 03:50 PM   #57
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Customer just came in with tire that is separated where he had it plugged. It hacked him off enough he bought four new tires. Cha-ching.Click image for larger version

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Old 08-17-2021, 11:37 AM   #58
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I carry an external plug kit.
Only to be used to get to the tire shop if there is no other way.

Question for the pros; if I use an external plug in an emergency can that be removed and a more permanent fix be done?

If I do get a tire plugged (at a shop) I still rotate that tire as a spare if it's on a trailer or the truck.
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Old 08-17-2021, 11:46 AM   #59
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I carry an external plug kit.
Only to be used to get to the tire shop if there is no other way.

Question for the pros; if I use an external plug in an emergency can that be removed and a more permanent fix be done?

If I do get a tire plugged (at a shop) I still rotate that tire as a spare if it's on a trailer or the truck.
Yes, the plug will be removed when they patch, though some still do plug and patch using plug patches. The plugs are only meant to get to a place to repair it. You want the fiber plugs, not the rubber ones, the belts will slice the rubber one in half and you will be flat in no time.
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