Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-12-2018, 02:34 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 114
XLR Boost 27QBX charge batteries via Tow V alternator?

Newb here,
Looking at purchasing an XLR Boost 27 QBX . Do the batteries charge from the tow vehicle while towing/in transit? Or only when plugged into shore power?
If there is a generator installed, would someone want to run the generator while in transit to camp site/etc to charge batteries? Im asking because Im wondering how the fridge would stay cold / might want to run ac so its cool upon arrival. Are these valid question?
Thanks for any help
__________________

Deanm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 08:43 AM   #2
Fulltime family RVer
 
ependydad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 19,905
In my experience, the tow vehicle pushes a minuscule amount of charge back to the camper’s batteries. In my case, it’s barely enough to cover the RV fridge running on propane and parasitic charges.

As for your refrigerator running, it really depends if it is an electric-only residential fridge or if it is a 2-way RV fridge that runs on either electric or on 12v+propane.

Do you know what kind you have?
__________________

__________________
2018 Ram 3500 DRW/crew cab/long bed/4x4/4.10 gears pulling a 2017 Spartan 1245 by Prime Time
Checkout my site for RVing tips, tricks, and info | My family and I have fulltimed since June 2015
ependydad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 01:09 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by ependydad View Post
In my experience, the tow vehicle pushes a minuscule amount of charge back to the camperís batteries. In my case, itís barely enough to cover the RV fridge running on propane and parasitic charges.

As for your refrigerator running, it really depends if it is an electric-only residential fridge or if it is a 2-way RV fridge that runs on either electric or on 12v+propane.

Do you know what kind you have?
I dont have one yet. Still in learning / research phase. Toy haulers are my interest right now. Specifically this one XLR Boost 27QBX Toy Haulers by Forest River RV
We want to use AC if needed and will boonedock only on occasion. The add on generator is pricey. Im tryimg learn about the batteries ( I assumed fully charged batteries and propane would keep a fridge going for a road trip? ). I'm seeing lots of RVers use the Honda Generators instead of the expensive ones wired into the rv.

We rented a Bunkhouse RV that you drive/ RV batteries always stayed charged because they charged when driving.....I was wondering if this is how TT worked?
Thanks for all the info, will check out your web site !!!
Deanm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 09:09 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 17
I've also looked into this, your tow vehicle will keep your batteries charged through your 7 pin connector but not much else. You will need to run some 10ga wire from your tow vehicle battery to your trailer battery. You also need to make sure your alternator can keep up, most should.
- Dave
dronning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 03:54 PM   #5
Fulltime family RVer
 
ependydad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 19,905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanm View Post
I'm seeing lots of RVers use the Honda Generators instead of the expensive ones wired into the rv.
After having a pair of portable Hondas vs. a built-in generator. I have to be honest, I don't think I'll ever be without a built-in generator now! It's wonderful!
__________________
2018 Ram 3500 DRW/crew cab/long bed/4x4/4.10 gears pulling a 2017 Spartan 1245 by Prime Time
Checkout my site for RVing tips, tricks, and info | My family and I have fulltimed since June 2015
ependydad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2018, 08:15 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
WolfWhistle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,275
Charge a battery from your TV? Here's the issues... its two-fold. It is impractical. First is the length of the wire run and the nature or design of the TVs battery / charging system.

Ideally the length of run and cable gauge of choice from charging source to battery should be such to produce less than 3% voltage drop. That's one and the other the TV's alternator and battery (or batteries if a diesel) are designed to take care of its own. You want to hang a battery (or batteries) onto this system that requires different charging parameters and charging timing. You have to isolate them. This is done with a DC to DC converter so the TV battery (or system) and house battery can play well together.

You would need to run (protected by fuse or breaker essential for safety) 6 AWG copper wire as a minimum; with no more than 25 feet total run (TV battery - DC/DC converter - trailer battery) with the return or negative (frame to frame) conductor less than 5 feet, which I think should be 1 AWG or #1/0 AWG. The method of passing these in a nice easily plugged and unplugged arrangement has to be considered. Maybe use plugs and sockets designed for a welder??

If you have 14.0 leaving the converter (placed near TV battery) that would give you 13.6 vdc to the battery. This is a bit skimpy and might take a day or days to get one battery back to happy, depending on the depth of discharge you are starting with and the current being used as you drive.

So, although possible, it is in my opinion impractical. Practical would be to add 300W to 400W solar to get the charging job done while on the road.

This is my opinion and if your's differs keep it to yourself. I am not in the debating mood.
WW
__________________
Hyper Lite was sold

2017 F-250 4x4 6.2L Gas
I can't fix everything, but I can make it so nobody else can
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2018, 01:54 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by WolfWhistle View Post
Charge a battery from your TV? Here's the issues... its two-fold. It is impractical. First is the length of the wire run and the nature or design of the TVs battery / charging system.

Ideally the length of run and cable gauge of choice from charging source to battery should be such to produce less than 3% voltage drop. That's one and the other the TV's alternator and battery (or batteries if a diesel) are designed to take care of its own. You want to hang a battery (or batteries) onto this system that requires different charging parameters and charging timing. You have to isolate them. This is done with a DC to DC converter so the TV battery (or system) and house battery can play well together.

You would need to run (protected by fuse or breaker essential for safety) 6 AWG copper wire as a minimum; with no more than 25 feet total run (TV battery - DC/DC converter - trailer battery) with the return or negative (frame to frame) conductor less than 5 feet, which I think should be 1 AWG or #1/0 AWG. The method of passing these in a nice easily plugged and unplugged arrangement has to be considered. Maybe use plugs and sockets designed for a welder??

If you have 14.0 leaving the converter (placed near TV battery) that would give you 13.6 vdc to the battery. This is a bit skimpy and might take a day or days to get one battery back to happy, depending on the depth of discharge you are starting with and the current being used as you drive.

So, although possible, it is in my opinion impractical. Practical would be to add 300W to 400W solar to get the charging job done while on the road.

This is my opinion and if your's differs keep it to yourself. I am not in the debating mood.
WW
Thanks for the reply,

You put some thought into that, and definitely helps my learning process as is all the immersion Ive been doing on the sublject of RVing these past few weeks. In my OP Im just trying to figure out how it all works/ workflow of camping with a toy hauler tt/ how most people do it.
Ex. fill propane / charge batteries at home ( or storage ) with shore power / turn on fridge / load food / drive to campsite ( what if over night trip, boondocking / how do most keep batteries charged if you don't have a built in Generator? / etc.
I'm starting to see the big picture. Dealer wants big money to add the Cummings gen to RV, so I spent hours reading about the Hondas / Champion/ etc options and plugging in/ filling gas up/ etc. And making sure it runs A/C ( contemplating how much the A/C will be required vs how much boondocking we will do.
Looking forward to learning how other people do it.
Deanm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2018, 03:32 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 83
As they say, the battery's will charge while you drive, or keep them maintained. Doesn't do much good to try to charge them by the vehicle while boon docking. Ours have the generator already installed, and the first time i went to use it, i couldn't get it to start. Seems like the battery wasn't charged enough to start it. Ours have the battery/ propane fridge, and i would put it on gas while you travel to keep it cold. We have a Honda generator, if we need it. While we haven't really camped in it yet, we keep the quads in it ready so if we want to go other places than our property, we would be ready. Also be ready on the brakes when you load quads. I ran into my wifes (hers were first) and crashed it into the cabinets the second time i loaded them.
__________________
Tim Myers
2013 Ford F-450
2015 Sabre 34 REQS-6
2018 XLR Boost 27QRB
dustym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2018, 07:47 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
WolfWhistle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanm View Post
Thanks for the reply,
Ex. fill propane / charge batteries at home ( or storage ) with shore power / turn on fridge / load food / drive to campsite ( what if over night trip, boondocking / how do most keep batteries charged if you don't have a built in Generator? / etc.
I'm starting to see the big picture. Dealer wants big money to add the Cummings gen to RV, so I spent hours reading about the Hondas / Champion/ etc options and plugging in/ filling gas up/ etc. And making sure it runs A/C ( contemplating how much the A/C will be required vs how much boondocking we will do.
Looking forward to learning how other people do it.
Typical of me, I kill with info. There are so many variables and the typical question lack enough detail for a detailed answer, but this helps. Yes, start the journey with full batteries. Assuming lead-acid these converters take in the days rather than hours to get it full from half full (Full is 12.65 vdc and half is 11.9 vdc... never let them go much below that... 11 volts is deader than my head and doing that will drastically shorten the life of them... Battery science is very complicated. The key is knowing what volts mean and when to read them. I also wouldn't be without a good battery status monitor... about $130 now with the required Shunt, with which you will know without the hassle. To really know status based on voltage reading you have to have let them rest... or sit not being charged or under load for about 12 hours... many times impractical or impossible. If under load they will read lower than they are and if being or just having been charged, higher than actuality.

So, before you take off, make sure they are topped off... as in full. Even if you have to remove and do it at home. Don't forget to check the water every 3 months unless they are sealed.

These are absorption type fridges and take way longer than a compressor type to cool down. So, at least a day ahead, two or three if you can... plug it in and prove its working either on shore or Propane and put a lot of cold things in there... I might throw two or three of ice in it. The key is everything you put it is already cold. Loading it with warm things will take a looooong time to cool down, maybe after you get back home.

You should also be able to run a 13.5K a/c ahead of time, from a 20 Amp home socket to cool down the trailer.

I think you meant Onan, not Cummins. As far as how much generator this same a/c needs it is probably 3000 watts, since they only peak at that number. 3500 w is much better and 4000 w the best. You can run almost everything on 4000 watts. This is where I won't skimp. Get an inverter type generator, not a open frame or contractor's model. Open frame is very noisy. And, your neighbors will hate you. There are now a ton of okay to darn good small inverter types available... Honda and Yamaha are number 1, but some of the new kids on the block are good and affordable. It is possible to have two 2000 watt inverter types paralleled with a cable kit, to produce 4000 watts total, and gives you the ability to run, again, nearly everything but only run one when it will do... say charging batteries... or running just the microwave and are easier on the back. Chain or cable them down and lock them up. Also handy around the house. Loloho has good vids on generators...

https://www.amazon.com/ideas/amzn1.a.../38CHCV4EBH183

Thinking about boondocking... new challenges.

Never get to your remote side with black or gray tanks full. Remember to dump, not like I have done.

Of course you will want fridge and water heater on Propane... I only turn on the WH when I need it then off. So, water and battery power are two things that will probably limit your stay, so figure out how to get more water without moving the trailer... bladder... pump... you can use jugs or large bottles for drinking and cooking only. Some people forget to fill their hot water tank before get out there, that is 6 to 8 gallons that won't come from your fresh water tank. You can use very very little water showering with practice, even capturing the cold water into a pan or bucket while you wait for the hot to get to the shower and use it for dishes... something. Sink baths if push comes to shove.

If you're camping in cold weather, the furnace will really chew up a lot of battery running off and on all night. To even think about boondocking have 2 very good batteries... I prefer two or even four - 6 volt golf cart, true deep cycle in series... shop around for the best prices for a couple of 220 amp / hour batteries. Or two 12 volt in parallel, but 100 - 205 ah each. Spending a little more you could supplement charging with solar power on a small scale using a suitcase or DIY 100 to 200 watt (better) solar set up nd a very affordable 15 amp solar controller. The suitcase lets you get them to the sunny spot if you are in partially shade.

So, there's some thoughts for you to get started. I wish you all the best and please contact me if I can help further
WW
__________________

__________________
Hyper Lite was sold

2017 F-250 4x4 6.2L Gas
I can't fix everything, but I can make it so nobody else can
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
batteries, xlr

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:43 AM.


×