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Old 06-06-2019, 02:59 PM   #1
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Where to place jack when changing tire

I have a 2018 315RST Crusader. Can someone please tell me the proper place to jack the unit without causing damage? My owners manual does not address this. Some say to place under axle near or on u-bolt and others say to place the jack against the frame. Any info would be appreciated.
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Old 06-06-2019, 03:25 PM   #2
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Either place should be ok, just don't lift at the center of the axle. Which you use depends on the type of jack you are using, the terrain the jack is resting on and the amount of lift the jack has.
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Old 06-06-2019, 03:36 PM   #3
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I'm no mechanic. I'm not even handy. So, take my advice for what you paid for it.

My take is that the axle tube is already supporting all of the weight at the U-bolts. So I jack between them or right next to them.



I really would like to have a "U" cradle made to straddle the U-bolt and curve up around the axle. But I haven't gotten around to asking anyone for it yet.

I also need to try out using my leveling system for this. Supposedly it's the easiest way!
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Old 06-06-2019, 04:04 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by ependydad View Post
I'm no mechanic. I'm not even handy. So, take my advice for what you paid for it.

My take is that the axle tube is already supporting all of the weight at the U-bolts. So I jack between them or right next to them.



I really would like to have a "U" cradle made to straddle the U-bolt and curve up around the axle. But I haven't gotten around to asking anyone for it yet.

I also need to try out using my leveling system for this. Supposedly it's the easiest way!
here you go...

https://safejacks.com/products/axle-...or-bottle-jack

or... welding required

https://www.amazon.com/SWAG-Road-Bot.../dp/B00LBFPN82
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Old 06-06-2019, 04:10 PM   #5
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I've had to change 2 tires on the side of the road over the years. I use the orange blocks that are stackable to make a " ramp" and then back onto or pull onto depending on the circumstances until the flat tire is suspended. Change then drive off ramp.
Greg in Michigan
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Old 06-06-2019, 05:46 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Greg in michigan View Post
I've had to change 2 tires on the side of the road over the years. I use the orange blocks that are stackable to make a " ramp" and then back onto or pull onto depending on the circumstances until the flat tire is suspended. Change then drive off ramp.
Greg in Michigan


Great idea !
Last tire I raised the side of the trailer with the leveling system.
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Old 06-06-2019, 06:42 PM   #7
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Where to place jack when changing tire

Best thing to do is get out your wood blocks and drive the trailer tires up on them and stabilize the RV and get the flat tire off the ground. Once you have it there, less jacking required. Stabilize the RV with stabilizing jacks if you don't have leveling jacks. Stabilizing jacks are not really made for lifting the RV. Then you can jack the RV up enough to get the inflated tire on.
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Old 06-07-2019, 12:34 PM   #8
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Jacking a Trailer

I had built, a half round 4" long piece that mounts on the top of my bottle jack. It snugly fits the OD of the axle. Then I place it as close to the axle end as possible. To me, its much safer than placing the jack under a spring or other flat area.
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Old 06-07-2019, 12:42 PM   #9
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At those prices... Rapid Jack?
https://www.amazon.com/Andersen-Manu...gateway&sr=8-3
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Old 06-07-2019, 12:48 PM   #10
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Using the leveling ramps is definately the way to go in my opinion. No crawling under rig, Safe, easy. Only one experience but easier than any tire change that I have ever done on an auto.
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Old 06-07-2019, 01:47 PM   #11
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Where to jack

Sure go ahead and put it under the axle of you want to bend the axle never put jack under axle always under the frame
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Old 06-07-2019, 04:00 PM   #12
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Sure go ahead and put it under the axle of you want to bend the axle never put jack under axle always under the frame
Iím truly not arguing and just want to understand... if Iím jacking right between the U-bolts and am only jacking the camper up to lift the tire, how is that different than the U-bolts themselves?
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Old 06-07-2019, 04:13 PM   #13
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I bought one of these and it works great. No hassle, no crawling under the trailer. Only issue is if you try to use it on really soft ground it can sink in and not be high enough. Tried using in my back yard and had to put a 2x10 under it. Of course, I carry a jack in case both tires go out as this only works if one goes flat.

https://www.amazon.com/Trailer-Aid-T...ESRSD30YD&th=1
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Old 06-07-2019, 06:05 PM   #14
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If you have a hydraulic leveling system, as we do on our Cardinal fifth-wheel, that is the easiest way to elevate the wheel with the flat tire for changing. If not, and you have a double axle trailer, use leveling blocks on the good tire on the same side as the flat. If you must use a bottle jack, do not put it directly into contact with the O.D. of the axle. The axle tubes are fairly thin wall tubing, and can crush under the concentrated force of the jack. Use a thick wooden block between the top of the jack and the U-bolts or fasteners that attach the springs to the axle.
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Old 06-07-2019, 06:11 PM   #15
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Tire change

I have one of Anderson Drive on ramps. Takes less than 10 minutes to change a flat and I use it to maintain my bearings. After having a tire shop bend the cross support w/ their floor jack. Even worse, it happened when I turned my back on them to get them a Coke for 5 minutes . I carry it w/ my trailer all the time. I fought w/ them for a month and still had to haul my trailer to frame repair shop 35 miles away. If you have the Dexter "Rubber" hubs there are no leaf springs and the cross reinforcement supports are very thin. Had mine replaced w/ thicker material when repaired. Personally, my next trailer will have leaf springs. My trailer is about 7300 lb. loaded and it is too heavy for this system. You can measure the distance between wheels on both sides when, you have your trailer turned. You can actually see the distances will be different. I tried the same w/ my flatbed, no difference.
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Old 06-07-2019, 07:36 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by ependydad View Post
I'm no mechanic. I'm not even handy. So, take my advice for what you paid for it.

My take is that the axle tube is already supporting all of the weight at the U-bolts. So I jack between them or right next to them.



I really would like to have a "U" cradle made to straddle the U-bolt and curve up around the axle. But I haven't gotten around to asking anyone for it yet.

I also need to try out using my leveling system for this. Supposedly it's the easiest way!



I have changed a dozen or more flats on campers over the years and this set up would make me a little nervous. This is your camper, but safety is always first and foremost. Emotions are high and we tend to get in a hurry when broke down on the side of the road. Are those plastic squares under your jack. I would not trust those if they were. Get several 2x6 or 10 inch boards cut about a foot or so in length. The Jack has the lift power, but the contact point of the jack and axle would also give me concerns. A smaller 2x10 with groves that match the u-bolts and indention hole on the bottom side about 1/8 to 1/4 deep to slide the jack into for stability. You have a good size rig and any movement could allow the jack to tip and someone could get hurt.





I do have ramp that from time to time I use to drive up on and lift the bad tire up. This does put a strain on the one good tire and leaf springs, so I also put a scissor jack with a large base and cupped top to lift the bad tire up for support.




There are many many ways to get hurt or something else bad could happen when changing a tire on the side of a busy road. Have a plan and backup plan Before you need it. Have all the right tools and practice before you need them. my current camper, I thought that I had all of the jacks, boards and tools that I would need to change a tire... wrong. First trip out, flat tire and come to find out that I needed a thin wall socket... I did not have a thin wall socket of the size that I needed... Brother-in-law was behind me and he had what I needed.
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Old 06-07-2019, 10:43 PM   #17
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I’m truly not arguing and just want to understand... if I’m jacking right between the U-bolts and am only jacking the camper up to lift the tire, how is that different than the U-bolts themselves?
The difference is that your U-bolts support zero weight. If you cut the U-bolts, the trailer would remain supported atop the axle. The weight is supported by the "pillow block" above the axle tube. The pillow block is contoured to distribute the weight evenly around the tube, avoiding damage. The U-bolts merely hold the axle tube in place. Your jack might deform the axle tube by pressing a dent into it. Placing the jack between the U-bolts is irrelevant to the ability of the tube to withstand the pressure point of the jack head (unless the tube is reinforced at that point by the manufacturer--which may be unlikely). Also, the jack head is not particularly stable at this jacking point, and the axle tube might slip off. A wooden block as suggested by Brother Les between the jack and axle might help with instability and axle tube deformation forces, but if that block splits, everything goes to heck in a handbasket. I'm also with Brother Les on not trusting some plastic blocks. A 2x10 wooden block between the jack and plastic blocks would greatly help distribute the load and reduce this failure potential.

Other than having to crawl under the rig with a heavy jack, your system would be good for an axle that sits atop the springs with the U-bolts inverted from your rig's position. In that configuration, a jack under the springs would impose no additional load on the axle tube.
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Old 06-07-2019, 11:23 PM   #18
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I just went through this on the phone with Dexter axles and emails to Prime time. I had to change all 4 of my tires one by one so i was looking for the right .... way and in the end i was told for my 2012 tracer 3150bhd with Dexter Axles i was to only jack just in front or just behind the shackles on the frame. I used about 5 orange blocks, 1 4x6 wood block and a bottle jack to change all 4. i just finished today tightening all wheel lug nuts 1,2,3,4,5,6 pattern and torquing them 25lb,60lb, and 95lb to finish it up. I am now on to the debate of what axle grease to use and how it should be done,,, Here is the video i used for guidance since encase someone needs it, his trailer has the same suspension setup as mine

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Old 06-08-2019, 01:03 AM   #19
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The difference is that your U-bolts support zero weight. If you cut the U-bolts, the trailer would remain supported atop the axle. The weight is supported by the "pillow block" above the axle tube. The pillow block is contoured to distribute the weight evenly around the tube, avoiding damage. The U-bolts merely hold the axle tube in place. Your jack might deform the axle tube by pressing a dent into it. Placing the jack between the U-bolts is irrelevant to the ability of the tube to withstand the pressure point of the jack head (unless the tube is reinforced at that point by the manufacturer--which may be unlikely). Also, the jack head is not particularly stable at this jacking point, and the axle tube might slip off. A wooden block as suggested by Brother Les between the jack and axle might help with instability and axle tube deformation forces, but if that block splits, everything goes to heck in a handbasket. I'm also with Brother Les on not trusting some plastic blocks. A 2x10 wooden block between the jack and plastic blocks would greatly help distribute the load and reduce this failure potential.

Other than having to crawl under the rig with a heavy jack, your system would be good for an axle that sits atop the springs with the U-bolts inverted from your rig's position. In that configuration, a jack under the springs would impose no additional load on the axle tube.
Thanks for the explanation of load and how itís different than the U-bolts.

For the most part, Iím only lifting the single axle/tire and never lift the whole side of the camper. So I donít think itís carrying that much weight for the orange blocks. I can imagine a couple of scenarios where it has safety implications when maneuvering the tire.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:27 AM   #20
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Thanks for the explanation of load and how itís different than the U-bolts.

For the most part, Iím only lifting the single axle/tire and never lift the whole side of the camper. So I donít think itís carrying that much weight for the orange blocks. I can imagine a couple of scenarios where it has safety implications when maneuvering the tire.
Since you have used the method in your photo, it may work well for you with no damage and acceptable risk. If your axle tube is thick and you keep things stable, you might be fine. I did say my concern was with "some" plastic blocks. Some new ones will likely be strong enough, but almost all plastic weakens over time by oxidation and other processes. I'd use wood to spread the load over the entire plastic block surface.
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