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Old 09-08-2020, 08:02 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
This is somewhat related.



Has any family attempted an RV fire drill? Almost all of us have that funny window with the red handle. It's often over the bed, and the sill is probably six feet from the ground.



Your first impulse would be to belly-crawl prone to the window and just dive out--a recipe to drop six feet land on your head. On reflection, I would like to go feet first, bend at the hip and let my legs hang down, grasp the sill and lower myself to the ground.



Has anyone tried this?



Has anyone practiced this?



How about the rest of the family? DW? Kids?



I come from an industrial environment where OSHA required annual fire drills--and they were timed. If the evacuation took too long, we did it again. It seems foolhardy to not practice this in the trailer, at least once.


I agree with feet first and add some bedding draped over the sill to ease the transition avoiding skinned shins or getting caught on a belt buckle.
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Old 09-08-2020, 08:36 AM   #22
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So it appears...according to the news that the fire where all those campers had to be evacuated by helicopter....was started by a "Gender Reveal Party" ??
That was the El Dorado fire.
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Old 09-08-2020, 12:14 PM   #23
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So it appears...according to the news that the fire where all those campers had to be evacuated by helicopter....was started by a "Gender Reveal Party" ??
Yup, and the pyrotechnics "went off accidentally", right! Some jail time and restitution is in order.
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Old 09-08-2020, 02:30 PM   #24
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So it appears...according to the news that the fire where all those campers had to be evacuated by helicopter....was started by a "Gender Reveal Party" ??
Different fire and area of California.

The fire where RVers were trapped, is the Creek Fire, in Central California Sierras between Yosemite and Kings Canyon NPs.

The gender reveal fire, the El Dorado Fire, is in Southern California, East of San Bernardino.
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Old 09-08-2020, 07:20 PM   #25
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People need to watch the sky. Watch it during the day and watch it at night. Keep track of any smoke plumes. If you are in an area of thick smoke, then you need to leave, because you cannot see approaching fires. Be really careful about roads that only have one way in. That is your only escape route. What if it is on fire? What is a tree falls in your path?

I like the idea of keeping a trailer hooked up and ready to go. I was camping with some friends in the Sierra a couple of years ago. I was watching a smoke plume that started heading our way. There was only one road in. I packed up to leave and told my friends to do the same. We left. My friends went back in which I could never figure out.

A shovel, water, fire extinguishers, etc will do you no good if there is a fire. An axe, a saw or a chain saw may help you clear a road. Do not mess with forest fires.
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Old 09-09-2020, 02:18 AM   #26
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My rv is always stocked & ready in case of a wildfire or earthquake. Having lived in Malibu for many years and have gone thru/ evacuated way too many wildfires over the years. Now living in the Sierras and breathing heavy smoke from the numerous fires. My biggest concern is if itís going to be windy. If strong winds were in the forecast, we stay close to home in case of fire. Iíve seen fires stroked by wind burn 25 miles in less than an hour. So yes, I would definitely reconsider camping in heat, windy conditions and afternoon lightening storms in isolated areas. Also, when they start shutting down roads/ highways you can get stranded or have to reroute hours or days out of your way.
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Old 09-09-2020, 11:40 AM   #27
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Heard from our niece and family last night. They live in Springfield, OR. They were forced to bug-out with their TT last night due to encroaching wildfires. The boondocks is not the place you want to be. They headed for the hardstand where there is little or no fuel for the fires. They spent the night at a Rest Stop on I-5 along with numerous others in the same predicament.
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Old 09-09-2020, 12:10 PM   #28
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Different fire and area of California.

The fire where RVers were trapped, is the Creek Fire, in Central California Sierras between Yosemite and Kings Canyon NPs.

The gender reveal fire, the El Dorado Fire, is in Southern California, East of San Bernardino.
Thanks ! Either way......IT WAS STUPID ! Folks ? stop blowing things up to tell us what your kid is going to be.
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Old 09-09-2020, 07:18 PM   #29
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Let's all get out there and rake the forests!!!
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Old 09-10-2020, 06:54 PM   #30
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Let's all get out there and rake the forests!!!
We used to use minimum security inmates to clear brush from our state managed forests.

Not any more.
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Old 09-10-2020, 07:32 PM   #31
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Shovel and water can help if someone has a campfire get out of hand.
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Originally Posted by ppine View Post
People need to watch the sky. Watch it during the day and watch it at night. Keep track of any smoke plumes. If you are in an area of thick smoke, then you need to leave, because you cannot see approaching fires. Be really careful about roads that only have one way in. That is your only escape route. What if it is on fire? What is a tree falls in your path?

I like the idea of keeping a trailer hooked up and ready to go. I was camping with some friends in the Sierra a couple of years ago. I was watching a smoke plume that started heading our way. There was only one road in. I packed up to leave and told my friends to do the same. We left. My friends went back in which I could never figure out.

A shovel, water, fire extinguishers, etc will do you no good if there is a fire. An axe, a saw or a chain saw may help you clear a road. Do not mess with forest fires.
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Old 09-14-2020, 07:29 PM   #32
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Speaking from professional experience: When wildfire threatens, leave early. You donít need permission to evacuate - and if youíre waiting for someone to tell you, youíre waiting too long.

Mr Brian
I have a saying about bugging out: When you first think of it, that is the time to do it. If you wait until you know it's time, it's often too late then. Easier to say than to follow.

We have been trapped in our house for 5 days now for Hazardous off the charts smoke. The nearest little 10 acres fire was a few miles away but they got that one under control. The next nearest Big Hollow Fire is 35 miles away now, 20k acres and zero percent contained. RV is pointed out the drive, filled, stocked and ready to go. However, now, it's too hazy to see to drive most of the time. That's what I get for letting kids in school and wife working online influence my decision. That and I don't trust the RV to work for more than a day if I do have to bugout.

Not to worry though, we've got a 20 acre field 1/4 mile from the house that is mostly fresh dirt with nothing to burn for a few hundred feet in each direction. We also have full face industrial respirators so the smoke won't get us. As long as it doesn't get too hot to bake us, we're good.
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Old 09-14-2020, 07:49 PM   #33
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I have a saying about bugging out: When you first think of it, that is the time to do it. If you wait until you know it's time, it's often too late then. Easier to say than to follow.

We have been trapped in our house for 5 days now for Hazardous off the charts smoke. The nearest little 10 acres fire was a few miles away but they got that one under control. The next nearest Big Hollow Fire is 35 miles away now, 20k acres and zero percent contained. RV is pointed out the drive, filled, stocked and ready to go. However, now, it's too hazy to see to drive most of the time. That's what I get for letting kids in school and wife working online influence my decision. That and I don't trust the RV to work for more than a day if I do have to bugout.

Not to worry though, we've got a 20 acre field 1/4 mile from the house that is mostly fresh dirt with nothing to burn for a few hundred feet in each direction. We also have full face industrial respirators so the smoke won't get us. As long as it doesn't get too hot to bake us, we're good.
A lot depends on what surrounds that field, doesn't take much to bake a human. A lot of people around here didn’t evacuate Last time we had a nearby fire, they said they were staying to protect their house. Because there weren’t enough fire fighters to do it. Well I love my house, my last new one, but I love me just a little more and I don’t want to test the oven after its lit and I can’t shut it off.
I do have my own 1800 gallon water truck with a 4“ pump, and I can fill it from my tanks at 100 gpm or my well at 50 gpm, but I only consider it good enough to snuff out some embers that might land here or something that happens too close for evacuating, even then I am only covered by skin and flammables.
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Old 09-14-2020, 08:07 PM   #34
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Boondocking/Camping in the 3 West Coast States

USFS has closed all forests and facilities in Region 5 and 6, all 3 western states. Heavy smoke is making life miserable throughout all western states. Boondocking is prohibited until the fires and danger has subsided. Private RV parks are open but choked out with smoke and the evacuated.

Best to delay visiting and camping on the western 3 states for a few more weeks.
Don't become part of a the problem.

Sometimes you can't see the forest for the trees!

When camping always plan ahead, have escape routes and a safety zones identified, keep an ear to weather and fire information at your chosen location.
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Old 09-14-2020, 08:11 PM   #35
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Field Baking

We've got some large Doug Firs on one side but 2 sides are bordered by other pastures and the 3rd side a road. I'm not too worried about the heat. It's not like we'd be surrounded by close forest. Besides, that's just plan C in case we get trapped before we can get out.
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Old 09-14-2020, 08:30 PM   #36
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USFS has closed all forests and facilities in Region 5 and 6, all 3 western states. Heavy smoke is making life miserable throughout all western states. Boondocking is prohibited until the fires and danger has subsided. Private RV parks are open but choked out with smoke and the evacuated.

Best to delay visiting and camping on the western 3 states for a few more weeks.
Don't become part of a the problem.

Sometimes you can't see the forest for the trees!

When camping always plan ahead, have escape routes and a safety zones identified, keep an ear to weather and fire information at your chosen location.
But I live in a national forest. Right now there isnít any smoke and the nighttime cool down is starting.
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Old 09-15-2020, 02:14 PM   #37
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We always considered our old TT to be an integral part of our emergency evacuation plan. Fortunately, we had an RV spot for it at home. Every time we came home from camping, the black and grey tanks were emptied and the fresh water tank was filled. The vehicles were always at least half full. We had an extra full propane tank at home we could throw in if needed. We always had canned and dry foods on board which we rotated on a regular basis. We also had extra clothing, bedding, etc.
We lived in the Sierra Nevada foothills between Sacramento and Lake Tahoe. We never were required to evacuate but whenever we heard of a fire anywhere near us, we would go ahead and load up just like it was an evacuation order, just in case it started looking bad. I would back the pickup along side of the garage, load up the generator, fuel cans, spare water cans, then back up to the TT, hitch up and pull into the driveway ready to go. In the meanwhile, the DW would have pulled the 72 hour packs from by the door and put them into her car, load up the cats in their carriers and put them in the car and was ready to pull out. Total time: 8 minutes.
Unfortunately, we moved 14 months ago to Bakersfield, CA and live in a house with an HOA that wonít let you park your TT in front of the house for more than 4 hours. Since the old trailer was getting long in the tooth and didnít have all the powered niceties someone in their 70ís appreciates we got rid of the TT. That lasted for about a year, then we couldnít stand it any longer and just got a new TT. We have it in a storage lot about 2 miles down the road. Problem is the gate is only open from 7 am to 7 pm, so itís not as convenient, but itís better than nothing.
Hey there Grandpa Paul. Sounds like you used to lived near where we do now. Pollock Pines. Name is the same too. Fortunately, we can keep our TT here from May through October. Have to store it lower down in the winter due to snow, but basically keep it stocked like you do. We don't do any RVing November through March. Of course it takes about 15 minutes to hook it up, so always hope we have at least that much time to clear out. My niece in the Paradise two years ago
had but 5 minutes to clear out and barely made it. But, it's great to have a TT in the event of evacuation.
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Old 09-15-2020, 03:24 PM   #38
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Thanks ! Either way......IT WAS STUPID ! Folks ? stop blowing things up to tell us what your kid is going to be.
I wish folks went back to "the old days", where you didn't find out until delivery.

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Old 09-15-2020, 06:05 PM   #39
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We've got some large Doug Firs on one side but 2 sides are bordered by other pastures and the 3rd side a road. I'm not too worried about the heat. It's not like we'd be surrounded by close forest. Besides, that's just plan C in case we get trapped before we can get out.
Just being in a large field may not be safe at all. Most out of control, wind driven, wildfires travel great distances just from the embers carried by the wind. If anything in that field is flammable you'd better have a way to wet down the embers. That includes people.

Years ago I watched a news video of a group of people surrounded by fire while in the middle of an open field. Sky was black, flames around them heating the air to dangerous levels, and embers falling out of the sky that made it look like they were being shot at with tracer rounds.


Me? I'd just as soon leave at the first sign of an approaching fire and be in a different zip code by the time it reached my last location.


BTW, the fire I posted about that made my camping trip a short one has grown to well over 3000 acres and air quality in the campground is so bad visibility is reported as near zero.
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Old 09-26-2020, 06:15 PM   #40
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titan Mike,
Shovel, bucket, and fire extinguishers are fine for controlling camp fires. For forest fires, which is the subject at hand they are of no use at all.
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