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Old 02-28-2021, 12:46 PM   #1
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194 vs 208 BHS

Specifically referring to the space you get in between table, counters and sleeping, is there much of a difference?

It seems to me that the extra few feet affords you the queen orientation and a bit more room for the bathroom and bunks, but the common space is about the same?

Anyone have an idea?
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Old 03-02-2021, 01:44 PM   #2
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Most of the Apex Nanos have the same layout in the middle of the trailer. Kitchen with the dinette across from it. I had the same experience when researching our purchase. The extra axle, a little more closet space and the bigger bunks (bunks that adults and teenagers can use) were the deciding factor for us where weight wasn't much of a consideration for the tow vehicle we have.

The big reason they make the 194 and 208 is the GVWR. Keeping the weight rating below 5000 lbs. makes the 194 an option for mid size SUV's and pick-ups. I know people tow the 208 with mid sized vehicles but that's the big grey area of towing, max tow capacity vs. payload and GCVWR.
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Old 03-02-2021, 02:58 PM   #3
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Exactly, I have a ram 1500, but it's a v6 with only 4800 towing. After adding the off grid package and a full tank of water, that leaves me very little room for cargo.
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Old 03-03-2021, 12:22 PM   #4
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Well that's an interesting conundrum. Looks like you will have plenty of pay load to work with but not a whole bunch of towing. So If I were you I'd pull out my owners manual and find your GVRW and GCVWR, know exactly what limits you have to work with. You might be more capable than you think. If you are only over a limit by a few hundred pounds then maybe adding some air bags are an option. If you are not comfortable driving on the limits of your vehicles ability then maybe the 193 BHS is an option to consider.

One other bit of advice that I'll add is that a full tank of water (500+ lbs.) is a noticeable amount of shifting weight that you don't need to drive down the highway with. I get as close as I can to my destination before filling up at either a municipal yard, another campground or a truck stop. (We do quite a bit of boondocking) I bring along one of those 5 gal blue camping jugs and use that as drinking water. On longer trips I'll maybe put 5 -10 gal in the tank for my kids potty pit stops. As you are getting the off grid package I'm assuming that you plan to mostly boondock, a pair of 6 Volt batteries would be nice complement to that solar panel.

More food for thought.
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Old 03-03-2021, 12:41 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by B.Boudens View Post
Well that's an interesting conundrum. Looks like you will have plenty of pay load to work with but not a whole bunch of towing. So If I were you I'd pull out my owners manual and find your GVRW and GCVWR, know exactly what limits you have to work with.
Not sure where you got that since the OP never posted their payload, just the 4800lbs towing capacity.
The OP needs to start with the driver's door yellow payload sticker first. That will dictate what's the truck's limitations are first.
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Old 03-03-2021, 05:20 PM   #6
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Bikendan: You are correct about the yellow sticker, but he did state that it is a half ton which is a very safe bet that he will have at least 1200 lbs. worth of pay load probably more. But lets expand and use my two trucks as an example of how you can have a truck with a high pay load and low tow capabilities.

The weight game applies to trucks payload capacities as well. A Ford XL trim pkg. will have a higher payload than a King Ranch just because all those bells and whistles add weight. See below, my basic work truck vs. my mid level trim personal tuck.

Now add the weight of passengers, trailer hitch weight, Sway cont. and cargo in the truck. All of this is subtracted off your max towing. For my family this is about 1,200 lbs. The leftover number is what's available for the trailer and its cargo.

OR the simple math: Trailer GVRW + Truck GVRW must be less than GCVWR

My company work truck is a 2020 Silverado Custom ext. cab with the 2.7 Turbo. Supervisors truck, more for running around and dropping of material.
Curb weight - 5,055 lbs.
GVWR - 7,000 lbs.
Payload- 1,900+ lbs. (not sure off the top of my head but very close)
GCVWR - 12,000 lbs.
Max towing - 6,600 lbs.

My personal truck: 2011 Silverado LT Z71 w Max tow pkg. Crew Cab 5.3 V8
Curb weight - 5,404 lbs.
GVWR -7,000 lbs.
Payload - 1,596 lbs.
GCVWR - 15,000 lbs.
Max Towing - 9,500 lbs.

Trailer: 2021 Apex Nano 208 BHS with murphy bed, no A/C
Empty - 4066 lbs.
GVRW - 6000 lbs.
Cargo - 1934 lbs.

So can my work truck pull my trailer? Even with more payload than my personal truck? Maybe, depends on which way you do the math. Legally? Grey. From a commercial view, in Canada, No.

Hope this helps people out. Cheers
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Old 03-03-2021, 07:00 PM   #7
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Bikendan: You are correct about the yellow sticker, but he did state that it is a half ton which is a very safe bet that he will have at least 1200 lbs. worth of pay load probably more.
I respectfully disagree with you. I spent over 2 years looking for a used 1/2 ton crewcab truck, from the 5 major manufacturers. I probably looked at over 150 trucks.
About 33% had sticker payloads of 1000lbs or less. So saying that he will have at least 1200lbs is not a sure thing nor a safe bet.
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Old 03-04-2021, 01:13 PM   #8
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My capacity

I'd have to order the 208bhs, he said about 1 - 2 months. The last one he got weighed in at 4100 with the murphy bed.

I've read the murphy/bendy bed is very uncomfortable so I'd opt to not get that. So hopefully I'd be closer to 4000lbs.

My vin at the Ram website says I have:

MAX PAYLOAD
1732.61LBS
MAX TOWING
4782.61LBS

In that scenario, would you think I'd be in good shape if I towed it and only filled water at the closest place to destination?

I plan on trading my truck up next year too. If I wasn't trading it up, I'd probably just go with the 194bhs for piece of mind.
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Old 03-04-2021, 11:33 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by chargraves85 View Post
I'd have to order the 208bhs, he said about 1 - 2 months. The last one he got weighed in at 4100 with the murphy bed.

I've read the murphy/bendy bed is very uncomfortable so I'd opt to not get that. So hopefully I'd be closer to 4000lbs.

My vin at the Ram website says I have:

MAX PAYLOAD
1732.61LBS
MAX TOWING
4782.61LBS

In that scenario, would you think I'd be in good shape if I towed it and only filled water at the closest place to destination?

I plan on trading my truck up next year too. If I wasn't trading it up, I'd probably just go with the 194bhs for piece of mind.
Did you not look at the driver's door yellow payload sticker? It'll say "Occupants and cargo should not exceed xxxxlbs".
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and Zoe the Wonder Dog(R.I.P.)
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4pt Equal-i-zer WDH and 1828lbs of payload capacity
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Old 03-05-2021, 06:21 PM   #10
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Oh boy you are asking loaded questions. Are you new to towing in general, my good sir or madam? I'm kinda getting that vibe and that's totally fine. Obviously, I'm from the construction world and knowledge transfer, coaching and mentoring is a big part of keeping people safe. No such thing as a silly question. But as I only have a tiny picture of your specific circumstances, I can only offer general advice and my own experiences.

So I'll offer a little more about my experiences. I've been towing stuff since I've been able to drive. In my line of work, before my current roll, towing is a daily occurrence. small to medium sized earthmoving equipment, utility trailers, dump trailers all of it. Here in Alberta GVRW's or GAWRs (weight limits) must be posted on the vehicles or trailers exterior and not be exceed. Do we exceed those limits? Yes, particularly with the dump trailers. But the towing aspects are lower in profile for flat deck and dump trailers, the weight distributions are different as well as how wind and other external influences affect towing compared to travel trailers. Which have a big side and front profiles that ride higher off the ground compared to a cargo trailer. But let’s stick to the topics at hand.

Most cases involving towing with travel trailers are issues regarding payload. Generally you'll run up against maxing out a tucks pay load capacity long before reaching your tow limits. (see my trucks payload as an example. I’m only a couple hundred pounds away from my limit.) Causing the rear end of the vehicle to squat. This is where BikenDan's comments are completely valid. And this is where equipment like, weight distribution hitches and air bags help mitigate (but not eliminate) the effects on driving experience and vehicle control.

If your payload and towing numbers are accurate. What issues you might run up against are performance. Your set up might look right, you might have a enough payload to handle the trailer weight that gets transferred onto your hitch and the people plus cargo you plan to carry in the truck. But in doing so uses up every ounce of towing you have. The time it takes you to get up to speed and stop, will increase dramatically. Your engine and trans may have to work hard to maintain highway speeds. How hard? I don't know. I can tell you from experience, it's not fun tromping your foot to the floor with the RPMS in the red and you are still losing speed going up a hill. (I will state that I was on a private haul road when I did this, but I went from 80 km to almost 30 km by the time I got to the top.)

BUT I don't know what your situation is. How far do from home is the nearest camp site? Planning on long multi spot trips? Do you live in the mountains? Do you have a lot of highway driving involved? What are the rules regarding towing in your state? What class of hitch do you have? I suggest putting it all down on paper and crunching all your numbers. The weight of people and cargo added to both truck and trailer weights. How much over/under on that max towing are you gonna be? Are you comfortable being at the limit? I did read that you are planning on trading in for a new truck anyway. So, I feel for ya.

Loaded questions Eh? How about moving on to another topic that I’ll be happy to confirm for you. Yes the murphy bed option was uncomfortable. The transition from the hard platform to soft cushions of the couch was noticeable. We solved this by adding some of those ¾ in blue camping matts under the top of the bed and put a 2-inch firm foam topper on the mattress. Its still able to fold up and comfort is much improved. We like having the murphy bed option because its nice to be able to have a spot where out toddlers can play that’s not on the floor and you don’t have to keep bending over to interact with them. You sit on the couch and they are at eye level. My wife also uses the space as a lounge to read her books. Plus, you don’t have to sit on your bedding. We went with the 208 over the 194 mostly because of the double bunks, We don't want to up size again. Also, at the time the dealer had no 193’s or 194’s for us to look at.

Wow, what and essay! Crunch your numbers and if you need any help don’t be afraid to ask.

Happy Camping
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Old 03-09-2021, 08:45 PM   #11
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People, I accidentally upgraded to a bigger truck. Problem solved haha
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