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Old 06-26-2020, 08:53 PM   #1
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adding a demand water to Kitchen faucet.

I have a small on demand water heater that I'm thinking of adding to the kitchen faucet plumbing. My thought is to T off of the cold water supply, and T into the hot water supply to the kitchen faucet. I would add a on/off switch to the demand water heater so that if I'm heating my system with either 120vac or propane I could turn off the demand heater. My thought is that when you need to briefly wash hands or even wash the dishes you wouldn't need to "fire up" the onboard water heater. Any and all input welcomed.
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Old 06-26-2020, 09:13 PM   #2
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Just wondering, do you live in this unit full time?
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Old 06-26-2020, 09:55 PM   #3
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No on full time.

I just like the idea of having hot water for brief use without waiting for the main water heater to get hot.
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Old 06-27-2020, 07:04 AM   #4
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OK thanks.
Your plan should work fine.

I asked because some folks who boondock without hookups like to conserve water use. An on-demand water heater certainly helps with this.

For those who camp mostly in campgrounds with hookups, it usually isn't an issue. Simply turn on the water heater and leave it on for the duration of the stay. The few cups of water you run down the drain waiting for hot water in a R/V where the piping is small and the water heater isn't really all that far away is typically not a concern.
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Old 06-27-2020, 07:14 AM   #5
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it seems like you'd be spending money, to save money, with little upside.... other than more work to make it happen. I think you'll agree that 'hot water' in the water tank actually stays hot for quite a long, long time even when the power source has been turned off.
This 'instant' water heater is going to have to have some type of power source, too, and it's doubtful that you might not run just as much water thru the faucet before it actually gets as 'hot' as you are expecting, anyway. If the power source is propane, well, then you have to run a propane line to it - not maybe as easy as at first glance. If the power source is 120v electricity, then you'd have to either be plugged into an outlet, or have a generator running, etc., but the electrical 'instant' heaters actually take much longer to 'heat' the water than you think - and probably take 240v power, which you may not have, regardless. Most folks will tell you that the 120v variety aren't going to give you the power you need for 'instant' hot water, at least not 'instantly'.

I think you'd just be added another 'device' that costs money and time and may not necessarily give you the 'outcome' you expect. 'Instant' water heaters are not really that 'instant'.... add the fact that if you're not on Shore Water, your water pump may also not provide the 'ummmph' of pressure to even trigger the instant water heater to come on. This has been an issue for many RVs with built-in instant/tankless water heaters.
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Old 06-27-2020, 07:19 AM   #6
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it also seems that RV water heaters are actually pretty efficient, whether running it with propane, electricity, or a combo of both, as some of us do - I think you'd have to offset a LOT of propane or electrical 'cost' to replace any of that specific kitchen 'usage' with a separate water heater for 'just' the kitchen faucet.

Enjoy! Keep it simple.
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Old 06-27-2020, 07:51 AM   #7
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He isn't spending money if he already has the heater as he stated. I like the idea not for the reason of saving water but rather to slow down the filling of the grey water tank. Many places we camp have water and electric but not a sewer connection to empty the grey tank.
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Old 06-27-2020, 08:06 AM   #8
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I installed a State ES6-10-SOMS-K ten-gallon 120 volt water heater under my kitchen sink. It provides instant hot water to my kitchen and it supplements my hot water demand for showering, etc.

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Old 06-27-2020, 08:16 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CedarCreekWoody View Post
...I like the idea ... to slow down the filling of the grey water tank....
how so? If you're opening a faucet, it's all going into the gray tank, right?
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Old 06-27-2020, 11:40 AM   #10
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(quoting "formerFR" add the fact that if you're not on Shore Water, your water pump may also not provide the 'ummmph' of pressure to even trigger the instant water heater to come on. This has been an issue for many RVs with built-in instant/tankless water heaters.)

I believe this to be a limiting factor if not on shore water. My DW and I boondock maybe 2% of the time so in that case I'd use my propane or generator power to use my onboard water heater.
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Old 06-27-2020, 11:48 AM   #11
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What I’m not clear on... is the PRIMARY water heater in the RV a tankless/ on demand unit? The may be why the OP is saying that they don’t want to have to fire up the main unit for hand washing? Just a guess.
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Old 06-27-2020, 11:52 AM   #12
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Keep in mind the electrical requirements for an electric instant water heater. In my experience the low power ones produce barely lukewarm water, and the ones that can make it hot consume well over 30A. Make sure your rig has the capacity to handle whatever you decide on. If you're thinking of a mini electric tank (<4gal) you'll probably be fine since most work on a standard 15A 110v outlet, though they're not really "on demand" since it's a tiny tank inside.
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Old 06-27-2020, 12:06 PM   #13
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My onboard water heater is the standard 6 gal 120vac/propane unit.
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Old 06-27-2020, 12:18 PM   #14
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electrical concerns

Quote:
Originally Posted by graman View Post
Keep in mind the electrical requirements for an electric instant water heater. In my experience the low power ones produce barely lukewarm water, and the ones that can make it hot consume well over 30A. Make sure your rig has the capacity to handle whatever you decide on. If you're thinking of a mini electric tank (<4gal) you'll probably be fine since most work on a standard 15A 110v outlet, though they're not really "on demand" since it's a tiny tank inside.
The unit I have is a AO Smith signature model, dimensions 18" tall x 5' wide by 7' deep. So, it doesn't have much of a onboard tank. Uses 3000 watts so approx 25 amp draw. I have a 30 amp panel in my minilite 2504s so I will be well aware of not using the unit when a/c or microwave or basically any other large amperage drawing device. (Before my 32 year career in the Fire service I was a electrician in the USAF.) Good advice from all....
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Old 06-27-2020, 07:51 PM   #15
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another question

I also have a question to anyone with plumbing experience? Should I install a one way valve in the hot water out line in my onboard water heater? Seems like this would eliminate any backflow issue. Not sure with this hookup that that would be a problem.
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Old 06-27-2020, 09:55 PM   #16
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If you're going to use a device that draws 25A, I'd suspect that your rv 120V wiring is too small to properly carry that much current. You'll need #10 wire, rated at 30A. I suspect that the outlet wiring in your rig is all on 15A breakers and will be either #12 or #14. (#14 can handle 15A but, from a manufacturing standpoint, using #12 for all wiring prevents errors when wiring the air conditioner 20A circuits.)


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Old 06-28-2020, 12:59 AM   #17
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wiring

I already plan to use 10 gauge flexible welding cable, the run from the service panel to the unit is approx 8 ft so that should be acceptable. It will be on a 30 amp CB.
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Old 06-28-2020, 05:45 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Relder View Post
I have a small on demand water heater that I'm thinking of adding to the kitchen faucet plumbing.
Can you post the model number of the water heater you are planning on using? I would like to check out the specifications to see if I can find something comparable that will be more reliable and last longer.

You stated it is an A.O. Smith Signature Series, so you must have bought it at Lowe’s. If you haven’t already destroyed the packaging, you might want to think about returning it and buying a real A.O. Smith (or other brand) water heater from a plumbing supply house. I’m not going to get into the futile back-and-forth discussion/argument of the differences between the the made-for-Lowe’s/Home Depot water heaters and professional water heaters here...again, but I would like to help you end up with something you are going to be happy with. It may cost a few dollars more, but at least you won’t be replacing it every year, and if you do have problems with it, you will be dealing with the far-superior professional customer/tech support team rather than the “home center sales” support team.

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Old 06-28-2020, 06:09 AM   #19
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how so? If you're opening a faucet, it's all going into the gray tank, right?
When you wait for 60 seconds vs 5 seconds to get hot water out of the faucet a lot more water flows into the grey tank (while also wasting more water.)
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Old 06-28-2020, 11:54 AM   #20
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Model: RPVR-30K Lowe's Item #: 1055558, main reason for this unit is it's small size. It will fit under the kitchen sink area and not take up very much space. Also, this unit was used for less than 30 days but the flow rate wasn't enough for the intended application (beauty shop hair washing station) so I got it for free. We camp (not this year, thanks covid) between 60-90 days per year so obviously it won't be used on an every day basis. If you have a recommendation I'm all ears..Thanks
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