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Old 12-21-2011, 07:05 PM   #1
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Is 80 pounds water pressure to the trailer too much?

Our house water pressure runs at least 80 pounds. Is this going to blow out stuff when I hook up the trailer? Looking over the trailer water system I see there are lots of plastic lines and fittings. It is a 2005.

I do have a residential pressure reducer that lowers it to 60 pounds that I could use to a separate faucet to supply the trailer here at home.

Thanks.

Ken
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:07 PM   #2
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I believe that my trailer is rated for 45 psi. It came with a brass pressure reducer.
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:16 PM   #3
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pressure regulator on that THING

get a pressure regulator on that THING ASAP
I would never run more that 50psi
no reason to
be asking for much (wet) trouble

cheap investment
10 bucks at WallMart
possible savings
the little Lady crying in the 2' feet deep
water in the bathroom

and saying
"yes dear"
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:28 PM   #4
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Depends on what kind of plumbing you have in the trailer.
If the tubing is gray your max will be 45 psi.

All newer units have PEX aka cross-linked polyethylene.
Blue & red in color. Blue for the cold feed & red for hot.

PEX is rated to 150 psi.
However your system is only as strong as the weakest link & that would be the bypass valves & faucets.

The faucets on most units are made in some third world country.
We needed to replace our kitchen faucet & the dealer price was $20.
We opted to go to HD for a real residential faucet.

I wouldn’t put any substantial pressure through any factory faucet.
You can get a pressure reducer at any RV store & on Amazon for about $40.
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:41 PM   #5
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Great! Thanks for the replies. I have not hooked up the water yet and was suspicious of 80 pounds.

Ken
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Old 12-21-2011, 11:07 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3 Happy Campers View Post
Depends on what kind of plumbing you have in the trailer.
If the tubing is gray your max will be 45 psi.

All newer units have PEX aka cross-linked polyethylene.
Blue & red in color. Blue for the cold feed & red for hot.

PEX is rated to 150 psi.
However your system is only as strong as the weakest link & that would be the bypass valves & faucets.

The faucets on most units are made in some third world country.
We needed to replace our kitchen faucet & the dealer price was $20.
We opted to go to HD for a real residential faucet.

I wouldn’t put any substantial pressure through any factory faucet.
You can get a pressure reducer at any RV store & on Amazon for about $40.

X2.

And there are several types of pressure reducers out there. Plain Brass (usually preset at 40 psi), brass with guage (so you can see that it's preset at 40 psi) and the adjustable type (so you can "bump" it up a little for those larger TT's and 5ers with the kitchen or bathroom at the oposite end from where your city hook up is).
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:36 AM   #7
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Why do you have 80 psi on your house, and what are using to measure it? Even if on city water, you should have a pressure regulator on your house system set at 45~50 psi. I'm surprised at that much pressure in a house. If on a well, need to tone it down a little. %0 is about the max.
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Old 12-22-2011, 02:19 AM   #8
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8.97 at WallMart

Walmart.com: Camco Brass Water Regulator: Automotive
Walmart.com: Camco Brass Water Regulator: Automotive
















Camco Brass Water Regulator
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Old 12-22-2011, 01:09 PM   #9
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We live in a hilly area (Golden Hills) outside the town of Tehachapi, OR, and water supply is to the entire area. We are in the lower elevation part of the water supply district so I think the people in the higher parts have more normal water pressure. When we moved in the neighbors warned us about the high water pressure. If I hold a hose and open the faucet all the way the water shoots a looong ways. I put a gauge on it and sure enough, 80 pounds.

I bought an residential in-line, adjustable, pressure regulator and toned it down but for some reason the flow at the faucets and shower heads in the house was too low then, abnormally low. Our house is a manufactured home built in 1996 so I know the lines are not clogged from deposits like older plumbing sometimes gets.

I am going to move the in-line pressure regulator to where it can supply for the trailer is going to be and then but that brass regulator from Walmart for when we are traveling.

I am glad I brought this issue up on the forum BEFORE I hooked up the water to the trailer. I see the trailer does have the right and blue plastic lines but there are just a lot of fittings that probably would love to leak at 80 pounds.

Thanks to all for the replies.

Ken
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Old 12-22-2011, 05:28 PM   #10
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spike hitting an easy 125psi

Quote:
Originally Posted by kernst52 View Post
We are in the lower elevation part of the water supply district so I think the people in the higher parts have more normal water pressure.

I put a gauge on it and sure enough, 80 pounds.

I am going to move the in-line pressure regulator to where it can supply for the trailer is going to be and then but that brass regulator from Walmart for when we are traveling.
worked for the City Parks (water) for a few years (32)
another great reason to have that regulator is
sometimes we have what we call spikes
can be caused by many reasons
large water system was shut down now turned back on
etc etc etc
I have seen areas with a spike hitting an easy 125psi
that will blow some pipes right up
at least that is a good way in which to find
the weakest lenk in our water lines or valves

Mountainman
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Old 12-23-2011, 09:59 PM   #11
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I live at the end of a pressure zone and it is customary to see 140# to 150# at my meter. I have a pressure regulator at the meter set at 80# because I have a 700' lateral to the house. I have a second regulator at the house set at 65#.

I have a bypass valve at the meter regulator for when I need full pressure for grading or fire fighting.
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Old 12-23-2011, 10:09 PM   #12
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that is a nice set up -- plenty of pressure and water !

Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuajim View Post
I have a pressure regulator at the meter set at 80# because I have a 700' lateral to the house.

I have a second regulator at the house set at 65#.

I have a bypass valve at the meter regulator for when I need full pressure for grading or fire fighting.
that is a nice set up -- plenty of pressure and water !

seen many of the larger pipes in my days of repairing
blow up due to air pressure
if a large line goes down
when bringing back on line
it is very important to open a few THINGS
when turning back on so as to let the air out
compressed air will find a way out
where water will not
I do this same THING with my home and trailer
when trailer has been down with (dry lines)
when turning the water back on
I like to let the air out as it comes up to pressure
to each his own
but
I have repaired enough THINGS in my life

I just want to camp
and
hike
and
bike ride
and
sail
oh yes
and kiss SweetTHING MountainLady

forget that
and it is going to get cold out there alone !!

MM
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Old 12-24-2011, 08:12 AM   #13
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To get back on topic and add to the OPs question--

I used the little brass regulator from camco or WalMart for years but
as mentioned, it restricted the flow and at times I felt like it let the
pressure creep up when water was not being used.
If I turned on a faucet I'd get a burst and then low flow.

I finally sucked it up and bought one of these
RV Water Filter Store: Standard Filter Canisters for Whole RV

I chose the Watts Brass Model 263A Adjustable Regulator, 10-65 range, 4-4.5 gpm
It's repairable meaning you can get kits to rebuild them if ever needed.
It works GREAT.

We left one of the other cheapie regulators on the water post one time
and now my wife always asks me if I've put the regulator away when
we're packing to bug out.

IF you're low use part timers the camco one will get the job done.
If you camp often and especially if you shower or want to fill a bathtub,
you'll be glad to have one of the full flow Watts models.
My 2˘
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:00 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountainmanbob View Post
get a pressure regulator on that THING ASAP...
cheap investment
10 bucks at WallMart
Ditto.

Wal-Mart actually is where I get most of my basic RV supplies...... more affordable there, and much closer to home.

Also preferred is to attach it to the spigot instead of the side of the RV.

More tips: get a 90 angle adapter to put between your hose and the water inlet on the RV.

I ALWAYS turn off the water when I leave the rig unattended, such as when I go hiking for the day, motorcycling, etc.
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