Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-31-2021, 06:30 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 53
Water Filters?

Until recently, I have never been too concerned with the quality of water when I connect to a state park or rv park, but lately I decided that I had better start filtering our water before it goes into the RV.
Initially I used an inline cartridge that the hose connected directly to, but recently I broke out my old canister/cartridge type and decided to mount that to my RV on a temporary bracket I made and use quick connect fittings on the hoses.
As I was finishing that up and being pretty proud of the results, I got to thinking; even though I am using a good quality cartridge that filters out most everything I would be worried about, what happens inside that cartridge after I disconnect from the water?? Once the hoses are disconnected, it becomes an open system. I plan to drain the water out of the canister and remove as much water as possible, and maybe store the cartridge inside a zip lock bag, but will bacteria grow inside the cartridge while it is stored between uses??
Does anyone have any experience with this or have any suggestions?

Thanks, Craig
CraigJean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 06:37 PM   #2
Site Team
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southwest Alabama
Posts: 9,851
Put a few drops of bleach in the bag with it and rinse it good next time you use it and it'll be fine.
__________________
Salem 29RKSS Pushing a GMC Sierra 2500HD!
Gotta go campin!
Bama Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 06:43 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 114
Short term storage, a day or two, no big deal. Longer storage is not advisable.

After a trip all the filter cartridges can be removed from the canister and dried on the counter. This is a huge benefit over factory sealed cartridges.

If desired rinse the filter cartridges in a solution 4-parts water to 1-part bleach (straight bleach not the ones with laundry products in them) before drying. Once the filter cartridge is dry, storage of the filter cartridges in a zip lock is not only a great idea but recommended.

If you have a filter cartridge with GAC or KDF, you cannot rinse them in bleach as the filter properties of a GAC or KDF media will be consumed by the bleach.
wszApex245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 08:06 PM   #4
Open Space Wanted
 
RedRoverComeOver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: X
Posts: 678
Bring Separate Drinking Water

  • Fill freshwater tank to capacity at campsite before leaving
  • Let most of the water drip out after filling
  • Put in gallon Ziploc freezer bag
  • Put in fridge when we get home
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Filter.jpg
Views:	86
Size:	208.7 KB
ID:	262034  
RedRoverComeOver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 08:07 PM   #5
Trailer Park Supervisor
 
NJKris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Northern NJ
Posts: 8,984
I always thought you should keep bleach/chlorine away from carbon filters. This is one of the reasons I don't use canister filters, just the blue torpedo. Between uses, I shake/drain as much water out as possible, cap then ends, and keep it in fridge. Never a problem in the month between uses.
__________________
2019 Rockwood Geo Pro G19FD w/off road package
2015 Ford F150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 V8
Yes, I drink the water!
NJKris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 08:09 PM   #6
Trailer Park Supervisor
 
NJKris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Northern NJ
Posts: 8,984
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRoverComeOver View Post
  • Fill freshwater tank to capacity at campsite before leaving
  • Let most of the water drip out after filling
  • Put in gallon Ziploc freezer bag
  • Put in fridge when we get home
U beat me to it. Trying to watch Lileyhammer at same time.
__________________
2019 Rockwood Geo Pro G19FD w/off road package
2015 Ford F150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 V8
Yes, I drink the water!
NJKris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 08:12 PM   #7
Open Space Wanted
 
RedRoverComeOver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: X
Posts: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJKris View Post
U beat me to it. Trying to watch Lileyhammer at same time.
Haha, yup.

Tried bullet points and graphic...maybe next time a PPT.

All while watching Hannity.
RedRoverComeOver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 08:16 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4,867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bama Rambler View Post
Put a few drops of bleach in the bag with it and rinse it good next time you use it and it'll be fine.
Just be aware that the main purpose of activated charcoal is to remove chlorine. So, to me, it doesn't make much sense to add chlorine to a filter cartridge whose main purpose is to remove it.
NavyLCDR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 08:42 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
nutdriver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJKris View Post
I always thought you should keep bleach/chlorine away from carbon filters. This is one of the reasons I don't use canister filters, just the blue torpedo. Between uses, I shake/drain as much water out as possible, cap then ends, and keep it in fridge. Never a problem in the month between uses.
I like the refrigerator idea. Guess it pays to read the directions. I have been writing the camping year on the blue torpedo filters each season. I start a new filter each camping year.


Between uses, I shake out the excess water after use and just store that in my under bed storage area. Before the next use, I run some water through the filter which I am hoping will refresh the filter some.


Has anyone tried shaking out the excess water from a blue torpedo then freezing the filter in a zip lock bag between uses? Just brainstorming... Seems like that would keep it even more safely if the freezing did not damage the filter.
__________________
2019 Freedom UltraLight 192RBS
2021 Sierra 3500HD Duramax
Anderson WD Hitch
TST 507 TPMS
nutdriver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2021, 08:56 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 114
Grandular Activated Carbon (GAC) is utilized in filters to reduce taste and odor issues in the water. GAC will have an impact on reducing most Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) present in the water. GAC will also catalytically reduce chlorine from an oxidizer (NaOCl) to a salt (NaCl).

In normal drinking water concentrations of 1 part per million (PPM) of chlorine or less for bacterialogical control, the GAC filter will remove the chlorine for a few months. If someone starts pouring grocery store chlorine at 1 part per hundred (10,000 times the 1 PPM) or even worse pool chlorine at 12 parts per hundred through their filter, the activated portion of the GAC will be consumed and completely ineffective.

I suggest no chlorine near your GAC filter.
wszApex245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 06:41 AM   #11
Site Team
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southwest Alabama
Posts: 9,851
The purpose of the 'few drops of bleach' is to kill any residual in the filter, and then it will be neutralized, but since the bag will be sealed it doesn't matter, and the filter media won't suffer from it.
__________________
Salem 29RKSS Pushing a GMC Sierra 2500HD!
Gotta go campin!
Bama Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 07:08 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4,867
And to think there are tens, if not hundreds of thousands of campers, like me, who have for years just unhooked the water filter and tossed it in their storage compartment until next use. Who would have thunk it to be a problem.
NavyLCDR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 08:40 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 114
With respect to water filters, the biggest risk campers face at campgrounds is exposure to E Coli (Escherichia coli) or Crypto (Cryptosporidium). E. Coli is a bacterium that growths in the intestinal tracts of infected animals and people. Crypto is a microscopic parasite found in animals. Both E. Coli and Crypto are leading causes of waterborne disease among humans in the United States. Both leach into ground water and surface water sources. Groundwater wells pump water from groundwater and surface water sources.

Both E. Coli and Crypto can grow at 39-113°F.
Both can survive refrigeration and freezing.
Filters collect germs from water, so someone who is not immunocompromised should change the filter cartridges.
Anyone changing the cartridges should wear gloves and wash hands afterwards.
(Source - CDC)

Among the water supply industry, campgrounds are notorious for E. coli and Cryptosporidium outbreaks because the campgrounds utilize their own groundwater wells treated by their own staff. Some states require licensing for the operators of these groundwater wells, but many do not. If the water is not treated and filtered properly, E. Coli and Crypto could be present in the water.

Most campers do not attribute the intestinal discomfort or diarrhea with the drinking water because they have left the campground and just attribute the symptoms to food poisoning. These events only make the news when more severe outbreaks occur, and the Health Department becomes engaged. The elderly, children, and immunocompromised are more susceptible to these diseases.

To protect yourself, the CDC recommends a filter with an “absolute 1 micron” NOT “nominal 1 micron”. If you want verifiable protection, the filter should be listed and labeled to NSF/ANSI Standard 53 or Standard 58 for cyst removal or cyst reduction by an ANSI-accredited certification organization. Look for “NSF 53” or “NSF 58” plus the words “cyst reduction” or “cyst removal” on the product label information. A word of caution, there are “1 Micron” filters labeled as NSF approved that are ONLY nominal 1 micron. Some nominal 1 micron filters will allow 20% to 30% of 1 micron particles (like Cryptosporidium) to pass through.

A 0.5 micron filter would insure the appropriate filtration. Just be sure to place 10 Micron filter upstream to remove the sediment prior to the 0.5 Micron filter.

Per the CDC’s website:
Filters designed to remove Crypto (any of the four messages below on a package label indicate that the filter should be able to remove Crypto):
- Reverse osmosis (with or without NSF 53 or NSF 58 labeling)
- Absolute pore size of 1 micron or smaller (with or without NSF 53 or NSF 58 labeling)
- Tested and certified to NSF/ANSI Standard 53 or NSF/ANSI Standard 58 for cyst removal
- Tested and certified to NSF/ANSI Standard 53 or NSF/ANSI Standard 58 for cyst reduction
Filters labeled only with these words may NOT be designed to remove Crypto
- Nominal pore size of 1 micron or smaller
- One micron filter
- Effective against Giardia
- Effective against parasites
- Carbon filter
- Water purifier
- EPA approved (Caution: EPA does not approve or test filters)
- EPA registered (Caution: EPA does not register filters based on their ability to remove Cryptosporidium)
- Activated carbon
- Removes chlorine
- Ultraviolet light
- Pentiodide resins
- Water softener
- Chlorinated

I drank from the hose, ate unwashed fruit from the fields as a kid, and and survived just like everyone else. I also worked in third world countries on drinking water systems to eliminate these diseases. I contracted one of these diseases once, lost 20-pounds in 3-days, and end up in a hospital.

This information is available from your locally "Licensed" drinking water professionals, your local university, and the CDC.

Happy camping and safe drinking.
wszApex245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 08:46 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
TowPro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 1,678
I used to buy the charcoal filters that run around $8 each and just thrown them out after every trip. But now we just carry water bottle for drinking/brushing teeth and just try to keep the water system purified using yearly sterilization and Camco tastePURE any time we put water in the tanks.
TowPro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 09:11 AM   #15
Trailer Park Supervisor
 
NJKris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Northern NJ
Posts: 8,984
Quote:
Originally Posted by wszApex245 View Post
With respect to water filters, the biggest risk campers face at campgrounds is exposure to E Coli (Escherichia coli) or Crypto (Cryptosporidium). E. Coli is a bacterium that growths in the intestinal tracts of infected animals and people. Crypto is a microscopic parasite found in animals. Both E. Coli and Crypto are leading causes of waterborne disease among humans in the United States. Both leach into ground water and surface water sources. Groundwater wells pump water from groundwater and surface water sources.

Both E. Coli and Crypto can grow at 39-113°F.
Both can survive refrigeration and freezing.
Filters collect germs from water, so someone who is not immunocompromised should change the filter cartridges.
Anyone changing the cartridges should wear gloves and wash hands afterwards.
(Source - CDC)

Among the water supply industry, campgrounds are notorious for E. coli and Cryptosporidium outbreaks because the campgrounds utilize their own groundwater wells treated by their own staff. Some states require licensing for the operators of these groundwater wells, but many do not. If the water is not treated and filtered properly, E. Coli and Crypto could be present in the water.

Most campers do not attribute the intestinal discomfort or diarrhea with the drinking water because they have left the campground and just attribute the symptoms to food poisoning. These events only make the news when more severe outbreaks occur, and the Health Department becomes engaged. The elderly, children, and immunocompromised are more susceptible to these diseases.

To protect yourself, the CDC recommends a filter with an “absolute 1 micron” NOT “nominal 1 micron”. If you want verifiable protection, the filter should be listed and labeled to NSF/ANSI Standard 53 or Standard 58 for cyst removal or cyst reduction by an ANSI-accredited certification organization. Look for “NSF 53” or “NSF 58” plus the words “cyst reduction” or “cyst removal” on the product label information. A word of caution, there are “1 Micron” filters labeled as NSF approved that are ONLY nominal 1 micron. Some nominal 1 micron filters will allow 20% to 30% of 1 micron particles (like Cryptosporidium) to pass through.

A 0.5 micron filter would insure the appropriate filtration. Just be sure to place 10 Micron filter upstream to remove the sediment prior to the 0.5 Micron filter.

Per the CDC’s website:
Filters designed to remove Crypto (any of the four messages below on a package label indicate that the filter should be able to remove Crypto):
- Reverse osmosis (with or without NSF 53 or NSF 58 labeling)
- Absolute pore size of 1 micron or smaller (with or without NSF 53 or NSF 58 labeling)
- Tested and certified to NSF/ANSI Standard 53 or NSF/ANSI Standard 58 for cyst removal
- Tested and certified to NSF/ANSI Standard 53 or NSF/ANSI Standard 58 for cyst reduction
Filters labeled only with these words may NOT be designed to remove Crypto
- Nominal pore size of 1 micron or smaller
- One micron filter
- Effective against Giardia
- Effective against parasites
- Carbon filter
- Water purifier
- EPA approved (Caution: EPA does not approve or test filters)
- EPA registered (Caution: EPA does not register filters based on their ability to remove Cryptosporidium)
- Activated carbon
- Removes chlorine
- Ultraviolet light
- Pentiodide resins
- Water softener
- Chlorinated

I drank from the hose, ate unwashed fruit from the fields as a kid, and and survived just like everyone else. I also worked in third world countries on drinking water systems to eliminate these diseases. I contracted one of these diseases once, lost 20-pounds in 3-days, and end up in a hospital.

This information is available from your locally "Licensed" drinking water professionals, your local university, and the CDC.

Happy camping and safe drinking.
Agree with most of that info, but I've been drinking unfiltered well water most of my life of 56 years, never had a problem. Wells that are susceptible to contamination are usually very shallow ones, which I'm hoping are not that common in campgrounds.



Using very fine filters like <1 micron sounds good, but they reduce water pressure/volume significantly, especially as they become clogged with stuff. Water pressure in RV's is already marginal at a lot of places.
__________________
2019 Rockwood Geo Pro G19FD w/off road package
2015 Ford F150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 V8
Yes, I drink the water!
NJKris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 09:24 AM   #16
Trailer Park Supervisor
 
NJKris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Northern NJ
Posts: 8,984
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutdriver View Post
I like the refrigerator idea. Guess it pays to read the directions. I have been writing the camping year on the blue torpedo filters each season. I start a new filter each camping year.


Between uses, I shake out the excess water after use and just store that in my under bed storage area. Before the next use, I run some water through the filter which I am hoping will refresh the filter some.


Has anyone tried shaking out the excess water from a blue torpedo then freezing the filter in a zip lock bag between uses? Just brainstorming... Seems like that would keep it even more safely if the freezing did not damage the filter.
I would not freeze, risk of damage to filter. Last thing you want is that cracking open and water gushing out all of your campsite until you realize what's happening.
__________________
2019 Rockwood Geo Pro G19FD w/off road package
2015 Ford F150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 V8
Yes, I drink the water!
NJKris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 12:09 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
nutdriver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJKris View Post
I would not freeze, risk of damage to filter. Last thing you want is that cracking open and water gushing out all of your campsite until you realize what's happening.

Good point!
__________________
2019 Freedom UltraLight 192RBS
2021 Sierra 3500HD Duramax
Anderson WD Hitch
TST 507 TPMS
nutdriver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 01:01 PM   #18
Pickin', Campin', Mason
 
5picker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: South Western PA
Posts: 19,278
Quote:
Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
And to think there are tens, if not hundreds of thousands of campers, like me, who have for years just unhooked the water filter and tossed it in their storage compartment until next use. Who would have thunk it to be a problem.
Count me in.

I use an external filter just like the OP mentioned. Have been doing so for close 30 years. When the camping trip is over, I drain it the best I can, put it in the tote with my hose(s) and quick-connect fittings and pull it out and use it next time. I do run a bit of water through the filter before attaching the hose but then I also run a bit of water out the pedestal before connecting the filter.

I usually use two filter cartridges per season. One at the beginning and one about halfway through the season. (unless water quality requires an additional change) When opening the canister I have never seen any signs of mold or growth of any sort. Nothing slimy in the canister and no odor.

Do whatever YOU feel is necessary.

Wonder what all you folks concerned about the filter do with the inside of your city water hose(s) and all the plumbing in your R/V between uses?

I sanitize once a year (at the start of the season) and never drain my low point drains, the fresh tank or the water heater between uses. I've done this with EVERY R/V I've owned and never an issue.
__________________
2022 Cedar Creek 345IK 5th Wheel•Solar & Inverter•2024 Ford F-Series SCREW•7.3L•4x4•Factory Puck•B&W Companion•TST Tire Monitor w/Repeater•Sinemate 3500w Gen.
F&AM Lodge 358 Somerset, PA - JAFFA Shrine - Altoona, PA

Days Camped '19=118 '20=116 '21=123 '22=134 '23=118 '24=90
5picker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2021, 02:41 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 760
I now use a 2 filter Clear Source with the 5 micron sediment and 0.2 micron filters. After I have sanitized my water system really well I now only ever put water into it that has been through my filter setup. Both city water connection and willing my FWT tank goes through the filter. I have one 4ft blue hose that is only ever used for the filter output into the trailer. I do not use the factory filter at all.

Before I leave camp the first thing broken down is my filter so it can be emptied and dried in the sun. Filters go back in the housings that are not screwed on tight and left to finish air drying until the next use. I live in an arid climate so moisture in the air is not an issue and the filters dry quickly after a trip.

I am replacing the two filters annually but that is probably overkill but they are relatively inexpensive
__________________
2021 Flagstaff 21DS
2015 Silverado 2500HD (overkill but convenient)

Renogy bits: 3000W Inverter/Charger, 400Ah LiFePo4, 40A DC-to-DC
Rich Solar bits: 400W of panels, 40A MPPT
Misc bits: LevelMatePro+, SolidRemote based wireless controlled LED storage lighting
jbflag21ds is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
water, water filter

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:01 AM.