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Old 07-27-2020, 10:58 PM   #1
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Electrical plug for couch

I have a 2014 Thunderbolt XLR that we bought used. Apparently the couch/recliner in it now is not original equipment since there are no power features on it. In the floor I found a 120 volt ac plastic plug that apparently went to some type of power couch. It's flat with three wires and I measured a 120 volt AC current from it. Do you know of a way to adapt this plug to a normal ac power outlet like you would find in a wall? Or maybe someone knows what the flat 3 wire plug is called so that I can find a matching plug to wire up an ac outlet.

Thanks for any help,
Chris Ring
Little Rock Arkansas
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Old 07-28-2020, 06:16 AM   #2
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There are numerous floor outlets that are used with hardwood and carpeted floors in stick houses that could be adapted to your situation, a pic would sure be nice and might provide a much better answer then mine.
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Old 07-28-2020, 09:51 AM   #3
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As Seadog said, a picture would help.
Does it look like any of the ones below?


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Old 07-28-2020, 10:19 PM   #4
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Thanks for your help folks.

Well, it doesn't match any of the plugs on Bama Rambler's images. I should have provided a picture in the first place. I think you should be able to see them at this link:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/snt8aTxZw9Q21NJx7

I'm thinking my best bet is to just cut it off and install a household type of plug.
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Old 07-29-2020, 11:47 AM   #5
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That's the type connector that they use for splices in units pre-wired for A/C.

It's called a "Self-Contained Power Connector for Solid Nonmetallic Sheathed Cable"


You can buy the mating half or you can just cut it off and wire in a standard receptacle. You need to find out what the breaker rating is that's powering that connector.
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Old 07-29-2020, 07:37 PM   #6
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Plug or receptacle

Quote:
Originally Posted by RingMaster View Post
I have a 2014 Thunderbolt XLR that we bought used. Apparently the couch/recliner in it now is not original equipment since there are no power features on it. In the floor I found a 120 volt ac plastic plug that apparently went to some type of power couch. It's flat with three wires and I measured a 120 volt AC current from it. Do you know of a way to adapt this plug to a normal ac power outlet like you would find in a wall? Or maybe someone knows what the flat 3 wire plug is called so that I can find a matching plug to wire up an ac outlet.

Thanks for any help,
Chris Ring
Little Rock Arkansas
Chris, I cannot be sure from your text whether you are looking for a cord plug with three prongs or a cord receptacle with three holes to accept prongs.
  1. Buy whichever you need--from Lowe's or Home Depot or Walmart or Amazon or Harbor Freight--whatever is convenient.
  2. Cut off the old connector.
  3. Strip the outer jacket back for about an inch without cutting the insulation on the three internal wires. The easiest way to do this is to bend the cable sharply and just touch it with a sharp knife. Twist the cord and touch again. Keep going until you've gone all the way around. Pull the jacket off.
  4. You will have exposed three wires, three brown paper twists, and perhaps a nylon string. Cut off the three paper twists and the string, flush with the remaining outer jacket.
  5. Now strip 1/2" off each of the three wires, Black, White, and Green. Easiest to do with a tool like this but you can do it with a knife.
  6. Twist each exposed copper end so the strands don't fray or separate as you connect them.
  7. Take the new connector apart.
  8. Loosen the two cable clamp screws and slide that part over the prepared cable. Push it down a ways to get it out of your way.
  9. Take the other part of the connector and loosen each clamp screw a few turns. Do not remove the screws.
  10. Insert the green wire into the green-colored clamp terminal and tighten it as tight as you can.
  11. Insert the white wire into the silver-colored clamp terminal and tighten it as tight as you can.
  12. Insert the black wire into the gold-colored clamp terminal and tighten it as tight as you can.
  13. Make sure there are no frayed strands touching the other terminals.
  14. Slide the two connector parts together. You may have to rotate them to get them to mate.
  15. Screw the two connectors together.
  16. Tighten the two cable clamp screws (that you loosened in step 8) moderately tight.
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Old 07-29-2020, 11:09 PM   #7
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Thanks Bama Rambler. Especially for pointing out that I should know the breaker amperage. I think I will just cut the original connector off. I read up on "Self-Contained Power Connector for Solid Nonmetallic Sheathed Cable". It seems this is mostly a time saving device for the RV construction project.

Larry-NC, Thanks for the detailed instructions. I'll use this when installing a receptacle from Home Depot.

Thanks Folks!
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Old 07-30-2020, 08:14 AM   #8
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Regarding steps 10-12

Quote:
Originally Posted by RingMaster View Post
Thanks Bama Rambler. Especially for pointing out that I should know the breaker amperage. I think I will just cut the original connector off. I read up on "Self-Contained Power Connector for Solid Nonmetallic Sheathed Cable". It seems this is mostly a time saving device for the RV construction project.

Larry-NC, Thanks for the detailed instructions. I'll use this when installing a receptacle from Home Depot.

Thanks Folks!
Regarding steps 10-12:
Some of the connectors have a clamp at each terminal. It's a square thin metal piece. You slip the twisted, stranded wire beneath it and tighten the screw.

Others merely have a "binder-head" screw, no clamp. If you get this kind. loosen the screw until it binds. Then wrap the twisted, stranded wire around the screw in a clockwise direction. Tuck it under the screw head with a small screwdriver or pinch it closed with a small long-nose pliers. Then, as with the other type, tighten it as tight as you can, and make sure there are no frayed strands touching the other terminals.
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