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Old 07-25-2018, 11:15 PM   #1
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Should I keep battery connected while using shore power?

Ok, I've looked thru several threads about batteries and shore power but I can't find an answer to this. Is there any reason that I would need to keep my 12V battery hooked up while using shore power? Is shore power sufficient to run everything on the TT or does the 12v supplement it? Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-25-2018, 11:20 PM   #2
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Is there any reason that I would need to keep a 12V battery hooked up while using shore power? Is shore power sufficient to run everything on the TT
most likely you do NOT need battery connected... maybe if you have all the lights on at the same time (12V) and the heat (12V needed for thermostat) the radio (12V), the fridge (some 12V used for control boards) and used your power awning switch, the converter may not be able to keep up with the demand... this is where the battery would put in some power to the circuit...

the converter in the trailer takes 120VAC and makes 12VDC to power all of these things when connected to shore power, but there is a limit of somewhere around 45 to 65 amps of DC made by the converter...
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Old 07-26-2018, 04:39 AM   #3
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better to have battery hooked up as converter will keep it charged and if you loose shore power your refrigerator should transfer to propane automatically (if you have dual type fridge).
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Old 07-26-2018, 04:49 AM   #4
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Always have your Batteries "Connected in the Loop" even when on Shore Power! The additional Load from "Slides/Levelers/Jacks/Awnings" need Plenty of Battery Power for a "Happy Longer Life"! Youroo!!
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Old 07-26-2018, 05:16 AM   #5
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Keep it hooked up, shore power keeps it charged.
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Old 07-26-2018, 07:34 AM   #6
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Thanks for the replies.

I understand that shore power will keep the batteries charged and ready to step in if necessary. I guess biggest concern was whether the converter would be able to handle the TT's full load on its own if necessary.

I appreciate the comments.
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Old 07-26-2018, 08:55 AM   #7
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I might disconnect the battery if I am going to be hooked up for a long stay. Something like weeks. From what I have read, the converter isn't a very good battery charger as it isn't "smart" and doesn't regulate itself during charging and could eventually "boil off" the water in your battery due to constant high charge.

Most of the 12 volt items that people listed such as levelers and such are one time use items that once camp is setup you don't use them again so that isn't much of a concern. The converter will be able to handle it. The biggest issue is with the fridge and a potential loss of power. You will need the battery if that happens. If in the several weeks the power seems stable and you trust it, turn off the battery switch and maybe just turn it back on if you are away from your camper for an extended period.

If you are camping like average people, for a week or less, I wouldn't worry about it and keep your battery connected.
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Old 07-26-2018, 09:21 AM   #8
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I guess biggest concern was whether the converter would be able to handle the TT's full load on its own if necessary.
What do you mean by 'full load'?
At some point you're not going to be able to run everything in that trailer at the same time whether you are on shore power or battery power or a combination.
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Old 07-26-2018, 09:26 AM   #9
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Thanks again.

One more battery question. I have an Optima D34M AGM Deep Cycle battery. Does anyone know if the TT's have any sort of microprocessor controlled charging or is it just a brute force (dumb) type of charging system?

I'm wondering if I would be better off using my OEM microprocessor charger instead of the one in the TT. (For extended battery life).




Thanks
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Old 07-26-2018, 09:41 AM   #10
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Thanks again.

One more battery question. I have an Optima D34M AGM Deep Cycle battery. Does anyone know if the TT's have any sort of microprocessor controlled charging or is it just a brute force (dumb) type of charging system?

I'm wondering if I would be better off using my OEM microprocessor charger instead of the one in the TT. (For extended battery life).


Thanks
Most RVs have decent 3 or 4 level, computer controlled charging. Progressive Dynamics units are good as are others, WFCO units are suspect, at least the older ones.
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Old 07-26-2018, 09:52 AM   #11
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Thanks for the replies.

I understand that shore power will keep the batteries charged and ready to step in if necessary. I guess biggest concern was whether the converter would be able to handle the TT's full load on its own if necessary.

I appreciate the comments.
Yes, the converter can supply the entire load if necessary. My neighbor has no battery in his trailer for 4 years.
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Old 07-26-2018, 10:37 AM   #12
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no need to keep battery hooked up while on shore power . i disconnect mine all the time and only connect every month or two to keep charged . otherwise the converter will supply all your 12v needs
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Old 07-26-2018, 12:42 PM   #13
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if you have a bluetop d34m you have a VERY small 50ah DUAL PURPOSE AGM battery capable of supporting only 25 amp hours of use before needing to be recharged.
Since you have a new coach you will have a 3 or 4 stage charger which will be fine with an agm battery ...thought the progressive converter is preferred over the WFCO.
The charging parameters for the bluetop are as follows and withing the specs of both the WFCO and Progressive chargers.
What I would NEVER do is leave this coach unused and unattended and plugged in for storage as AGMS will last for MANY months when fully charged and DISCONNECTED at the negative post ...and AGMS REALLY don't like to be overcharged by automatic cycles over time.

FWIW ... I have a LOW opinion of the Optimas for any true deep cycle work as they are overpriced and underperforming in terms of amp hours vs. competitive AGM deep cycles which deliver significantly more amp hours and life cycles. When it comes time for replacement OR expansion...suggest you get an AGM DEEP CYCLE from Trojan or Lifeline or Deka. And move to the biggest size that will fit in the space available.
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Old 07-26-2018, 06:04 PM   #14
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It aint gonna charge if it ain't gettin lectric to battery.
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Old 07-26-2018, 07:05 PM   #15
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Ok, I've looked thru several threads about batteries and shore power but I can't find an answer to this. Is there any reason that I would need to keep my 12V battery hooked up while using shore power? Is shore power sufficient to run everything on the TT or does the 12v supplement it? Thanks in advance.
In a typical Forest River trailer, all the usual electric stuff like lights and fans and pumps etc. are 12v. That means they run from the battery. When hooked to shore power, the charger/converter keeps the battery charged.

If you disconnect the battery you could/will lose lights and all that stuff mentioned. Leave it hooked up. If the lights, etc. do still operate without a battery, consider what happens when shore power goes off, for whatever reason. My advice is to leave it alone. Don't fiddle.
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Old 07-26-2018, 08:23 PM   #16
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In a typical Forest River trailer, all the usual electric stuff like lights and fans and pumps etc. are 12v. That means they run from the battery. When hooked to shore power, the charger/converter keeps the battery charged.

If you disconnect the battery you could/will lose lights and all that stuff mentioned. Leave it hooked up. If the lights, etc. do still operate without a battery, consider what happens when shore power goes off, for whatever reason. My advice is to leave it alone. Don't fiddle.

As long as your on shore power or genny running you do not need to be hooked up to the batteries . i stay in one spot all summer and leave the batteries disconnect off . no need to have voltage going to unused batteries . maybe once every 45 days i;ll turn it on to keep batteries topped off
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Old 07-26-2018, 08:56 PM   #17
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In a typical Forest River trailer, all the usual electric stuff like lights and fans and pumps etc. are 12v. That means they run from the battery. When hooked to shore power, the charger/converter keeps the battery charged.

If you disconnect the battery you could/will lose lights and all that stuff mentioned. Leave it hooked up. If the lights, etc. do still operate without a battery, consider what happens when shore power goes off, for whatever reason. My advice is to leave it alone. Don't fiddle.
The 12-volt circuits don't feed from the battery when the converter is on 120 volts. The converter feeds all the 12-volt fuses on the converter and has wires going to the battery to charge it. My neighbor has been living in his Forrest River Wildcat just like mine with no battery installed for 4 years. I keep a battery on mine all the time and the converter keeps it charged up. If the power goes out in a storm I will still have all 12 volt systems. My Neighbor will be SOL.
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Old 07-29-2018, 02:25 AM   #18
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My trailer has a three level charger/invertor. I leave it plugged in all the time when it's at my house.
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Old 07-29-2018, 09:17 AM   #19
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My 2011 Georgetown came with a single stage converter that output DC power at 13.6V. This is high enough to eventually fully charge the house battery but not high enough to boil off the electrolyte. I checked the house batteries regularly and never had to add distilled water to them. A year ago, I had to replace it with a multi stage replacement I've had available for a few years because I discovered that when it was recharging a well discharged battery, it has enough leakage current on its input side to trip a GFCI protected outlet. This was a problem because I required shore power overnight to power medical equipment and could not keep running the 100' to the outlet to keep resetting the GFCI.

My replacement converter is a multi stage WFCO unit. The one I have works without problems as observed using my two decimal voltmeter that's permanently attached to the battery. I can watch the converter change charge modes by monitoring the voltage being applied to the battery.

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