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Old 07-05-2022, 10:31 AM   #1
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Solar Power for a Travel Trailer

We are new to RVLife and purchased a 2022 Forest Rive Vibe. It came with a solar panel and battery and it runs everything Ok except for AC. We have a 50W AC and have to plug in to electric to power it. I have been looking at solar generators and panels to add/supplement what came with the RV. Do you have any advice or products you use and highly recommend? I'd like to purchase the least expensive option that will charge/store power and allow us to use power while it is charging.
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Old 07-05-2022, 11:01 AM   #2
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We are new to RVLife and purchased a 2022 Forest Rive Vibe. It came with a solar panel and battery and it runs everything Ok except for AC. We have a 50W AC and have to plug in to electric to power it. I have been looking at solar generators and panels to add/supplement what came with the RV. Do you have any advice or products you use and highly recommend? I'd like to purchase the least expensive option that will charge/store power and allow us to use power while it is charging.
Unless you tow a second trailer full of batteries and a big inverter, you'll won't be able to run the a/c without shore power or an inverter generator. Solar doesn't run anything, it just recharges the batteries. Solar has its limitations.
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Old 07-05-2022, 11:44 AM   #3
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Unless you tow a second trailer full of batteries and a big inverter, you'll won't be able to run the a/c without shore power or an inverter generator. Solar doesn't run anything, it just recharges the batteries. Solar has its limitations.
Dan's right, but please be careful with exaggeration. While it's a heavy user, AC use requires the same considerations as any other electric need aboard: what it's take to run and keep it running? A 3kw inverter will run a 15kbtu AC unit easily (especially easier with a softstart installed, similar to how a 2kw generator will run one).

Battery bank will determine how LONG your inverter will be able to power such. Low cost/Will Prouse approved Chins run @ 68 lbs per 300ah (my battery bank tips the scales at 136 lbs total, and can seriously and properly take the edge off the heat inside the coach). Move the batteries inside the house for some conditioned space/protection from cold weather and you even get some of that weight off the tongue, too (preserving tow vehicle payload).

Then you just need to add enough solar to the roof to fill (and refill) the battery bank and you're off to the races.

But to get all the benefits, solar is an all or nothing proposition: you need a solar array (panels on the roof), appropriate charge controller, a way to store that energy (battery, likely LiFePo), and a way to distribute it (a beefy inverter). You'll also be interested in upgrading your charge controller to take advantage of the LiFePo charging profile, and perhaps an automatic transfer switch that can deal with your new power input, the sun.

For a cost adverse approach, invest in a soft start for the AC (great upgrade) and a 2.2+kw inverter generator (add a fuel conversion kit to run on propane, or just plan to keep gasoline on hand). Lots of guidance here about inverter generators - Honda makes a lovely little one (though spendy), Harbor Freight has competitors at much lower cost, but higher noise levels.

But Dan does has a very good point: The solar starter pack that comes from the factory is enough to get owners interested, but not much more than a novelty for boondocking (esp when we factor in the needs of a 12v fridge).

Stackett, 50watts of solar is a mere trickle. You'd be much better off STARTING with two 195 watt panels, and expanding that to 5 or 6 panels total. If you've got an inverter aboard from the factory, it's likely a little guy, perhaps 1kw. You'll need more to spin your AC up to run.

The learning curve is fairly steep, and the cost are not for the faint hearted. If you bought your trailer with a 12v fridge, you're already going to need to expand your system to run that, but you've realized some cost savings over a 2-way fridge to help offset the cost of adding solar to the rig in a meaningful way.

This is just my opinion and your mileage may vary. Hope this helps.
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Old 07-05-2022, 12:36 PM   #4
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I have a 2021 Puma with a 13.5k btu AC unit and a 12 vdc frig. I built a solar generator with a 300 amp hour Lifepo4 battery, 2200 watt inverter, DC to DC charger with charge controller and 400 watts of solar panels. It will start and run the AC just fine but I only run it to cool someone off if they get overheated, no soft start installed. Actually the microwave draws more inrush current when starting than the AC. I'm good for a couple of days if the sun is shining. I built so I can use the shore power cable plugged into a receptacle that is on the solar generator. I would like to add more panels and 2nd battery. Yeah it's not cheap but the wife and I like to boondock once in awhile and it opens up alot of places to camp at
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Old 07-05-2022, 12:41 PM   #5
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Solar energy is wonderful, but it is important that you understand the subtleties. A 15KBTU A/C runs about 13 A @120AC . Running this from an inverter the inverter will draw approx 130A @12VDC. If you are using two 12V 200Ahr lithium batteries in parallel, you can run the A/C for a little over 2 hours at a 50% duty cycle before your batteries need recharging. To recharge your batteries in 8 hrs of full sun about 400W of solar panels. This is assuming you do not draw any other current from the 12V batteries other than the 2 hrs of A/C use. The spoiler in solar is for every amp of 120VACV you use from the inverter, you draw 10A from the 12VDC source.
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Old 07-05-2022, 01:14 PM   #6
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Actually "Solar" CAN run things and does all the time in many applications. The issue is that this only works when you have sufficient Solar capacity, plenty of Sun, and panels are properly aligned to the Sun when applications are running.

Moving on------

In order to run an A/C unit that draws 1.2 to 1.5 Kw of power on Solar one would need at least 1500 watts of Solar Panels on the roof of the RV. Not many have room for this many panels and even worse, the ability to keep them fully aligned with the sun would require some very expensive, and heavy, equipment.

Other issue often overlooked is that the Sun is only up and able to produce significant Solar Power for 1/3 to 1/2 of the day.

Dan is correct that one would need a lot of solar panels and a trailer load of batteries, unless you have a large Bus/Motorhome with room for both, in order to have reliable A/C.

Not leaving at that, here's an analysis of what it would take:

If you have a Solar "Trailer" like this it should be no problem. 18 - 400 watt panels would give you 7.2 Kw potential output.



Unfortunately running a 1.5 Kw A/C unit 24/7 like is necessary in many areas of the South/Southwest, the A/C would need 36 Kwh. Solar array would need to be able to provide enough power to run the A/C for ~ 10 hours (on a perfect solar day) This would amount 15 Kwh. It would also need to provide another 24 Kwh to to charge the batteries that would run the A/C at night (allowing for a 10% loss through Inverter). This would require a battery bank of 20 average 100 ah (1.2 Kwh) LiFePo4 batteries.

Now for the real 'reality check. The above scenario requires an estimated total Solar capability ~4 Kw. This would be 40-100 Watt Panels, 20-200 watt panels, or 10-400w .

The pictured trailer may be using 400 watt panels (~7,2 KW) which would satisfy the needs, with the benefits of easy(?) alignment to the Sun and a good storage area for the batteries (~30 -GC2's in series/parallel @66 lbs ea =~2,000 lbs OR ~600 lbs of LiFePo4)

400 watt panels from one supplier measure 79.8 in x 39.6 and 18, like shown on the trailer, would cover ~400 square feet. enough to create some shade if camping in the desert

Just thought I'd put some perspective in what it would take to run the A/C from solar/battery power rather than just leaving it at "a lot".

For cost, figure "a buck a watt" for solar ($7200). LiFePo4 batteries will be all over the place from $800 per 100 ah battery ~$1200 for a 300 ah battery ($8400-$16,000). Then add the cost of a 3,000 w + Inverter, mounting hardware, expensive heavy gauge wire, AND ---------the trailer
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Old 07-05-2022, 02:02 PM   #7
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Things have really changed over the last few years when it comes to solar power generators (Not to be confused with just a solar power system)

I use this as a plugin type power source to my Wolfpack.
https://allprogenerators.com/collect...nd-wind-system

At 3600w it will run EVERYTHING in the trailer when boondocking (Wolfpack 24Gold14), all night, and easily the next 1 or 2 days WITHOUT charging it back up. Charging can be done with the panels, wind or when plugged into 110v socket

'Plus it delivers 3600W while running and on start up

And the system costs WAY less than an ONAN 4000 or 5500. System can also be moved around (mobile) to power the house if needed, ground camping or outdoor events

Ill never go back to a dino genny, I hate the damn things anyways when boondocking. Nothing like 2-3 RVS running thier gennies in the wild. Nothing but noise
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Old 07-05-2022, 02:34 PM   #8
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As someone with a trailer that is capable of running the A/C for 4 hours without shore power, let me just say this:

Get a dual fuel generator instead if you are expecting to run the A/C for hours or at night.

Don't get me wrong, I love being able to run the A/C when I stop for lunch and have comfortable temps inside, or when I am boondocking at a truck/rest stop or BLM land for an overnight to just cool off the trailer before bed. But if you want to run A/C for any length of time and still have power for everything else that needs it and the next day once the sun is back up and you need to recharge plus run things... Get the genny

Edit to add: I just spent 4 nights boondocking outside Bend, OR and luckily it was 85 degrees or less during the day until the last day and I had full sun each day. I was able to run the A/C to knock temps down when I got back to the trailer and then open the windows and live with 78-80 degrees inside until the evenings AND be fully charged from solar by 12-1pm. It wasn't until the 4th day that I had to break out the genset since it was hot enough that I needed to run the A/C longer than I had battery capacity for. So sometimes you can get lucky not needing the genset.

I spent $6500 on my electrical upgrades (including wires, connectors, tools, misc stuff to do it right). The genset cost $1,085 for a 3400W Champion Dual Fuel. Given my travel style and trailer usage, my convenience is worth the cost of the electrical upgrades plus genset. I doubt most folks are in the same boat as me
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Old 07-05-2022, 03:26 PM   #9
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I appreciate all of the information. We bought a piece of land and installed septic for the travel trailer and have city water. We will live in the RV on the land most of the year and travel 3 or 4 weeks in it a year. So many considerations... Sounds like for our land we need a bank of solar panels on wheels, so we can move them to get optimal sun as the seasons change. Our first few camping trips will be at campgrounds with electric hookups.

I'll do more research based on the info you all have given me. Is there a company that specializes in RV solar setups to help me figure the exact components I need?
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Old 07-05-2022, 03:32 PM   #10
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Put panels on a post that gets the optimal sun then those can go to a battery bank and then an inverter you can plug into.

You can find online support for the best angle to set the array if you don't want to move it hourly. But you can move if a couple times a year based on season/sun elevation.

Won't help with the power needs during travel though, but it will make daily life on property easier.
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Old 07-05-2022, 04:15 PM   #11
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Learn some math,

P=IV Watts=Amps x voltage Most appliances list their usage in watts ac. Not dc.

12 ah dc is 1 ah ac via an inverter. Inverters are power hogs.

An ac unit likely needs 1400 ah dc per day or more. 5ah ac x 12 x24=1400/50 or 28 batteries. On a warm day, not hot.

On its best day in North America under ideal conditions, a rated 200 watt solar panel can produce 50 ah dc. Likely 1/2 your requirement for a day to run the radio, alarms, and if you are lucky, gas electric fridge and water pump. Gas water heater. and a cpap the other half. You need 1400 amps dc. 28 panels for ac.

The average car battery is good for 50 ah dc per day. Two is the minimum.

Your trailer will have 100 ah dc on day one if the sun cooperates. No shade is ok. The second day of perfect sun you will experience 0 power during the night.

Likely as not you have a compressor refrigerator. So expect dead batteries After 24 hours. Or less.

The furnace is a large electrical user. Turn it on the first time at 8pm and the DW will be talking to you at 2 am.

It is all in the math. You have to know what you have and load shed, turn stuff off, to make it last. You are the Captain.
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Old 07-05-2022, 04:16 PM   #12
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Things have really changed over the last few years when it comes to solar power generators (Not to be confused with just a solar power system)

I use this as a plugin type power source to my Wolfpack.
https://allprogenerators.com/collect...nd-wind-system

At 3600w it will run EVERYTHING in the trailer when boondocking (Wolfpack 24Gold14), all night, and easily the next 1 or 2 days WITHOUT charging it back up. Charging can be done with the panels, wind or when plugged into 110v socket

'Plus it delivers 3600W while running and on start up

And the system costs WAY less than an ONAN 4000 or 5500. System can also be moved around (mobile) to power the house if needed, ground camping or outdoor events

Ill never go back to a dino genny, I hate the damn things anyways when boondocking. Nothing like 2-3 RVS running thier gennies in the wild. Nothing but noise
You must not use much power for a 100AH battery to last 2 days and nights without charging.
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Old 07-05-2022, 04:44 PM   #13
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I can only say its the truth You guys need to just get away from dino gennies. I was sold on them for decades. Sorry, fuel gennies are dinosaurs
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Old 07-05-2022, 04:47 PM   #14
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You must not use much power for a 100AH battery to last 2 days and nights without charging.
I read the "solar/wind" system specs. Yes 3600 watt inverter but only a 100ah SLA battery, 400w of POLYCRYSTALINE solar panels, and a wind generator that is rated for 150 watts at wind speed of 27 mph.

Might delicer 3600 watts from the inverter but all night?

3600 watts sucks up 288 amps @12.5 volts. A SLA battery is lead/Acid chemistry so what DOD for long life? 50% ?

288 amps will drain a battery to zero in 21 minutes or less, assuming the low voltage shutdown on the inverter isn't activated sooner.

On the wind generator, I've found that other than winter months the wind speed usually drops significantly at night. Exception if course during a tornado. Hard to get much output from a wind turbine during a light evening breeze and camping during 25 mph winds isn't a lot of fun.
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Old 07-05-2022, 07:01 PM   #15
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I can only say its the truth You guys need to just get away from dino gennies. I was sold on them for decades. Sorry, fuel gennies are dinosaurs
Well, I'm not going to get rid of my Dino generator anytime soon.
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Old 07-05-2022, 07:10 PM   #16
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[QUOTE=melvinjo;2757454]
I use this as a plugin type power source to my Wolfpack.
https://allprogenerators.com/collect...nd-wind-system

At 3600w it will run EVERYTHING in the trailer when boondocking (Wolfpack 24Gold14), all night, and easily the next 1 or 2 days WITHOUT charging it back up. Charging can be done with the panels, wind or when plugged into 110v socket
/QUOTE]
Have you actually used this. Where do you get 3600 watts from?
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Old 07-05-2022, 07:52 PM   #17
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That unit has a 3600W inverter but only a 100Ah AGM battery powering it. 3600W may be 30A AC theoretical but that would need 300A DC (plus overhead) and I am not sure there is an AGM battery out there, or lithium for that matter, in that form factor that can handle a 300A current draw. Even if it could, that would last all of 20 minutes at 0% SOC, 10 minutes at 50% SOC if you wanted the thing to last long.

Factor in the max theoretical 400W of solar and 150W at 27mph of the wind turbine and you only get a few extra minutes without adding to the battery SOC.
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Old 07-05-2022, 09:29 PM   #18
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Your story sounds just like mine!...reading all these post trying to figure out what Portable Solar Pannel i need to keep battery charged when my RV is not running with the generator so it does not get depleded. However, most post discusses so many technical jargon that makes difficult to really find an answer. If someone reading this post, just simply tell me what do i need for my 2022 Forest River Puma with a Solar on the side. This uses SAE Plug Adapter...i really appreciate. And also says Rated for 20 amp..no idea what this mean. I appreciate your guidance.
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Old 07-05-2022, 09:45 PM   #19
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Solar Power for a Travel Trailer

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I appreciate all of the information. We bought a piece of land and installed septic for the travel trailer and have city water. We will live in the RV on the land most of the year and travel 3 or 4 weeks in it a year. So many considerations... Sounds like for our land we need a bank of solar panels on wheels, so we can move them to get optimal sun as the seasons change. Our first few camping trips will be at campgrounds with electric hookups.

I'll do more research based on the info you all have given me. Is there a company that specializes in RV solar setups to help me figure the exact components I need?

My solar installer is actually building a solar trailer for a client with 3,000 amps of lithium batteries. I’m looking forward to seeing it when it’s done.

OP, it would help to know what your budget is. You can drop $30k in a blink of an eye on a system. You’ll get more detailed suggestions knowing your budget.
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Old 07-06-2022, 09:20 AM   #20
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First, the folks that stated so called "facts": Read my link on the sytem on what I am using CLOSER: The solar genny has a 100ah battery. The pod has a 100ah battery as well.

The system is made so you can be delivered power with just the genny, IF THE STORAGE IN THE GENNY MEETS YOUR NEEDS. Then you can add "Pods" to increase your storage capacity. What you see/I have has two 100ah batteries. One can add more batteries/"pods" if desired

Again, it works as I said. Now I dont run around with every light or power sucker on all day and night when boondocking (except for fridge and AC, if needed), and I dont beleive folks with fuel geenys do either. But I can run my AC all night for a couple of days, fridge, microwave and lights, as needed.
I havent tried running everything for days at a time as a trail, just what I needed at the time I can say when its hot, at boondocking I run AC constantly with a floor fan

If it didnt work as I said, I would say so and use something else

We might be missing a point. I use this system only while boondocking. So the solar panels are out, as well as the windmill. So yes, the system is charging when this is happening. But again, I'm not running around for gas, propane or diesel either. And just me, I dont lke the idea of transporting gas or diesel in either cans or a large fuel station. Not just a possible safety issue, but they really take up space and weight

And the big point, at least for me, is that I cant stand the sound of a genny when I am boondocking, nor the fumes: To me, it really ruins the view. And with what I have, I can run EVERYTHING in my RV. Even when cloudy, the system still charges during daylight hours, even w/o the windmill. And I can move it to anywhere I want, which I have done. Try that with an enclosed RV fuel genny.

So the point some are making is battery power storage. FACT: This same exact system I used in a small cabin (I am using this same system now in my RV).

I took it with me for a planned 2 day trip to a remote cabin, so I did not have my panels or windmill with me. No need for them. My plan was to just use the 200ah storage capacity to run tools, air compressor, coffee maker, small e water heater, hot plate, small cabin heater, fridge, lights, and few small items like a radio, etc.

The weather turned really bad night of day 2. I was planning to leave the next am. Roads turned to a mudbath, a road I need to travel for about 8 miles till I got top hard top. So I waited for 2 more days till I could leave

Yes, I could power everything the entire time

The math some listed here is impressive: But get out of the books and try it for real.

Solar gennies (NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH JUST A SOLAR POWER SYSTEM) have really come far in the last few years: Fuel gennies really havent, unless you count on board inverters which most solar genny systems, (to include mine)

And let's face it. Fuel gennies dont store power. When running they provide power on demand WHILE CONSUMING FUEL or charge batteries for power storage. But when you run out of fuel, all you have now is your batteries. My 200ah batteries store and provide just fine

Doubt comes with what I beleive its an issue of something being "new". And I kinda get it. I was like that myself.

Fuel geenys are becoming dinosaurs for smaller use such as RVs: WAY overpriced at the dealer, have several moving parts that will wear, prodecs heat, requires fuel and oil, and still require batteries if you want power when they arent running
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