Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-29-2014, 10:32 PM   #1
Take The Road Less Travld
 
MuddauberE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 579
Voltage Too High

I started looking into adding the built in surge protector for my trailer. After reading up on the details, I learned that it auto shuts off and kills power to your trailer after reaching 128 volts. This raised a few flags as I have seen numbers above that in the past but never really thought anything of it. I right away tested the TT-30 in my garage and it metered 130-132 depending on the time of day. Well, this isn't going to work, the surge protector will never even turn on when I plug it into the Garage.

I did some more research and found that this isn't really good for my appliances at all and that it may cause damage when reaching ranges over 125 or so. I spoke with someone about the details and found out that my entire house was running this high at the recepticals.

I tested at the panel using a volt meter putting the ground on several different points on the neutral\ground bar in the panel and testing different power sources on different breakers. Some read 128 and others read 130. I was told my only option was to call the power company and they would have to fix it at the pole. I also read something about this could be caused by a bad neutral\ground in my house.

Before calling the power company, I wanted to check here and see what others had to say and maybe what else I can check if anything.
thanks



Sent from my iPad using Forest River Forums
__________________
"Take The Road Less Traveled"
2020 Cherokee 294BH
2021 Chevy Silverado 2500 6.6 diesel
I've been an RVer since 2007, Lifetime Camper
Gotta love the Outdoors, Disconnect and Enjoy Nature!
MuddauberE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 10:50 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
SKnight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,428
I just experienced that at my house, my fridge sounded funny one day and I found 140 at the outlets. I called the power company, they sent a truck out, they tested my neutral, said it was fine. As they were at the pole the voltage dropped to 124. They said they didn't change anything but apparently something happened.
__________________
Now-2014 Sierra 346RETS 5er BUB
Then-2002 Keystone Springdale 286RLDS TT

Nights camped in 2014-28, 2015-127, 2016-10
SKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 10:52 PM   #3
Take The Road Less Travld
 
MuddauberE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 579
Ha! Sounds like to me they fixed something or just cleaned off the dust on the transformer.


Sent from my iPad using Forest River Forums
__________________
"Take The Road Less Traveled"
2020 Cherokee 294BH
2021 Chevy Silverado 2500 6.6 diesel
I've been an RVer since 2007, Lifetime Camper
Gotta love the Outdoors, Disconnect and Enjoy Nature!
MuddauberE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2014, 10:55 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
SKnight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,428
Either they fixed something or accidentally tightened something up. It's still solid so I'm good.
__________________
Now-2014 Sierra 346RETS 5er BUB
Then-2002 Keystone Springdale 286RLDS TT

Nights camped in 2014-28, 2015-127, 2016-10
SKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2014, 07:38 AM   #5
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 23,015
Yep; transformer issue.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF1398.jpg
Views:	134
Size:	58.4 KB
ID:	56760  
__________________
Lou, Laura, & Freya the wonder dog
2008 GMC Sierra 3000HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2019 Flagstaff 8529FLS - Pullrite 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2014, 08:45 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Rutland, VT
Posts: 340
Utilities are allowed to have two utilization voltage ranges:
Range A is normal operation and is 120V +/- 5%
Range B is supposed to be of limited extent, frequency and duration. It is 120V with the range of +6% to -13%.
__________________
2016 Chevy Silverado 2500HD Duramax LTZ Z71 Extended Cab, Long bed
2012 Dodge Ram 1500 5.7L Hemi
(with K&N Air Intake) (traded)
2012 Rockwood 2109S (Sold)
2014 Cougar X-Lite 21RBS

wbdvt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2014, 08:47 AM   #7
Member
 
Wildcat661's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Cobalt, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 31
Same issue a few years ago

We had the same issues a few years back. Our light bulbs seemed brighter in the house and were burning out more than expected. Also, when the clothes dryer started, there was a noticeable thump. I then checked the receptacles with a multimeter and found it to be in the 140 volt range. Spoke to an electrician friend who stopped in and checked the voltage at the panel. He said it was definitely on the power company line. Called the power company and they had someone over fairly quickly and changed the transformer. No issues since then.

Bill

2012 GreyWolf 18rb
2011 Dodge Ram 5.7 Hemi
Equalizer Hitch
Wildcat661 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2014, 09:53 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuddauberE View Post
Ha! Sounds like to me they fixed something
View a wire from the pole's top to the transformer. Follow that wire back to another transformer. That is where your voltage is regulated. Inside, it changes taps (adjusts voltage) so that yours remains around 120 volts. Doing many adjustments daily.

Voltage that high is not great for appliances. But will not cause damage. However incandescent bulbs would be failing at well less than half their rated hours.

Key is whether bulbs change intensity when major appliances power cycle. In most cases, this is an interior wiring problem. In rare cases, this is a major human safety issue. For example, fortunately no one was home when that fault caused a gas meter explosion.

But a constant high voltage is a problem at that transformer far from you house and often surrounded by a very high chain line fence.
westom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2014, 10:26 PM   #9
Take The Road Less Travld
 
MuddauberE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 579
So the electric company came out and tested. Everything was fine. It was at 118 when he tested it. When I got home, I tested the same plug he tested and was getting a 130. I went to a friends house a few blocks away and was getting the same reading. Now I need to order a new volt meter before I'll know for sure.


Sent from my iPad using Forest River Forums
__________________
"Take The Road Less Traveled"
2020 Cherokee 294BH
2021 Chevy Silverado 2500 6.6 diesel
I've been an RVer since 2007, Lifetime Camper
Gotta love the Outdoors, Disconnect and Enjoy Nature!
MuddauberE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 06:39 AM   #10
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 23,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuddauberE View Post
So the electric company came out and tested. Everything was fine. It was at 118 when he tested it. When I got home, I tested the same plug he tested and was getting a 130. I went to a friends house a few blocks away and was getting the same reading. Now I need to order a new volt meter before I'll know for sure.


Sent from my iPad using Forest River Forums
The cheap ones do have a + range. Some are really big...
__________________
Lou, Laura, & Freya the wonder dog
2008 GMC Sierra 3000HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2019 Flagstaff 8529FLS - Pullrite 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 08:49 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
RPAspey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: central PA
Posts: 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuddauberE View Post
So the electric company came out and tested. Everything was fine. It was at 118 when he tested it. When I got home, I tested the same plug he tested and was getting a 130. I went to a friends house a few blocks away and was getting the same reading. Now I need to order a new volt meter before I'll know for sure.


Sent from my iPad using Forest River Forums
How much of a time difference was it between the utility guy measuring the voltage and you measuring the voltage? The line loading could have changed such that the voltage is really high. If the line voltage regulator for the power line that feeds your home is goofy, there may not be proper regulation. I've seen it many times.
__________________
2000 Cherokee 29BH with 6V batteries, LED lights & 400 watts of solar power, flipped axles and raised. 2007 Tundra 5.7L DC-LB with lots of mods. C-co, 8/158th AVN Maint.
RPAspey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 06:17 PM   #12
Take The Road Less Travld
 
MuddauberE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 579
There was about 5 hours difference. I was worried about the the load difference too which is why I'm going to get a new or borrowed one just to check.


Sent from my iPad using Forest River Forums
__________________
"Take The Road Less Traveled"
2020 Cherokee 294BH
2021 Chevy Silverado 2500 6.6 diesel
I've been an RVer since 2007, Lifetime Camper
Gotta love the Outdoors, Disconnect and Enjoy Nature!
MuddauberE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 08:46 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
RPAspey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: central PA
Posts: 978
Probably a good idea. 130v is way outside the 120v+/-5%. You really need to monitor this until you can confirm whats going on. Highest I remember is 132v, due to a faulty regulator. My company paid a lot of $ for personal propery that was fried.
__________________
2000 Cherokee 29BH with 6V batteries, LED lights & 400 watts of solar power, flipped axles and raised. 2007 Tundra 5.7L DC-LB with lots of mods. C-co, 8/158th AVN Maint.
RPAspey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 10:25 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
doodler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 202
Utility company where I live run close to 125v as possible and yes it does vary with line loading especially at peak times. Also low batteries in voltmeter can give you wild readings, might want to check that.
__________________
doodler
doodler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2014, 09:37 AM   #15
Take The Road Less Travld
 
MuddauberE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 579
Quote:
Originally Posted by doodler View Post
Utility company where I live run close to 125v as possible and yes it does vary with line loading especially at peak times. Also low batteries in voltmeter can give you wild readings, might want to check that.

Hmmmmm. Low batteries, that could be the problem. I know that thing had died a few times but seems to come back to life later. I don't think the battery is supposed to be a serviceable part, but of course I've opened it and I think it's just a AA battery


Sent from my iPad using Forest River Forums
__________________
"Take The Road Less Traveled"
2020 Cherokee 294BH
2021 Chevy Silverado 2500 6.6 diesel
I've been an RVer since 2007, Lifetime Camper
Gotta love the Outdoors, Disconnect and Enjoy Nature!
MuddauberE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2014, 09:58 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 10,907
In most meters, the battery is only for reading resistance. When reading amps/volts, the current to move the meter needle comes from what you're reading. (Qualifier - This may only apply to analog meters. I'm not too familiar with the guts of a digital meter.)
__________________
1988 Coleman Sequoia - popup (1987-2009) - outlasted 3 Dodge Grand Caravans!
2012 Roo19 - hybrid (2012-2015)

2016 Mini Lite 2503S - tt (2015 - ???)
2011 Traverse LT, 3.6L, FWD
2009 Silverado 1500 Ext Cab, 5.3L, 4x4, 3.73
2016 Silverado 2500HD Dbl Cab, 6.0L 4x4, 4.10
rockfordroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2014, 12:28 PM   #17
Take The Road Less Travld
 
MuddauberE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 579
Quote:
Originally Posted by doodler View Post
Utility company where I live run close to 125v as possible and yes it does vary with line loading especially at peak times. Also low batteries in voltmeter can give you wild readings, might want to check that.

So now that's interesting. I was hoping you were right but not expecting it. With a digital volt meter, make sure you have a good battery. I took out the 9v battery out of my digital voltmeter and found that it was jut about dead. Alive enough I guess to give me a zero reading before plugging into a wall jack but dead enough to sque the readings. So just now, I plug into the wall and I am getting a 124. I plug in the new battery and I'm getting a 118...... Just to make sure I do it again with the old battery an same readings. I try another plug and do the same thing. I'm getting a 6v difference in my readings. I keep the new battery and keep an eye on my "true" readings throughout the week and see what I'm getting. Thanks for all ya'lls input.


Take The Road Less Traveled!
__________________
"Take The Road Less Traveled"
2020 Cherokee 294BH
2021 Chevy Silverado 2500 6.6 diesel
I've been an RVer since 2007, Lifetime Camper
Gotta love the Outdoors, Disconnect and Enjoy Nature!
MuddauberE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2014, 04:29 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
doodler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 202
the digital voltmeters will give you wild readings with low battery no matter if your trying to read volts, amps or resistance/ohms.
__________________
doodler
doodler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2014, 04:50 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Rutland, VT
Posts: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by westom View Post
View a wire from the pole's top to the transformer. Follow that wire back to another transformer. That is where your voltage is regulated. Inside, it changes taps (adjusts voltage) so that yours remains around 120 volts. Doing many adjustments daily.

But a constant high voltage is a problem at that transformer far from you house and often surrounded by a very high chain line fence.
I may getting very technical here but the transformer on the pole outside of your house is not a tap changer one. The taps on those transformers are fixed. What does have taps is a voltage regulator.

Usually there is a piece of equipment called a voltage regulator somewhere on the line. This could be installed out on the line a distance from the substation, in the substation itself or the large power transformer in the substation may have a tap changer integral to it.

The voltage regulator is typically used to maintain voltage regulation on the line by either boosting or bucking the voltage by moving taps. It is set up by the utility to maintain voltage within limits at the farthest service point from that voltage regulator. Very long distribution lines may have several voltage regulators on the line. These do fail and the voltage may not regulate.

The electric power system is dynamic in that the voltage does fluctuate depending on many factors. The prevalent one is the loading on the line. If there is a large single load on the line, say a commercial/industrial facility, and something happens where the entire facility trips off line, the voltage will go high for a short period of time until voltage regulation can react and bring voltage back to normal. The reverse is true also.
__________________
2016 Chevy Silverado 2500HD Duramax LTZ Z71 Extended Cab, Long bed
2012 Dodge Ram 1500 5.7L Hemi
(with K&N Air Intake) (traded)
2012 Rockwood 2109S (Sold)
2014 Cougar X-Lite 21RBS

wbdvt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2014, 09:10 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
doodler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by wbdvt View Post
I may getting very technical here but the transformer on the pole outside of your house is not a tap changer one. The taps on those transformers are fixed. What does have taps is a voltage regulator.

Usually there is a piece of equipment called a voltage regulator somewhere on the line. This could be installed out on the line a distance from the substation, in the substation itself or the large power transformer in the substation may have a tap changer integral to it.

The voltage regulator is typically used to maintain voltage regulation on the line by either boosting or bucking the voltage by moving taps. It is set up by the utility to maintain voltage within limits at the farthest service point from that voltage regulator. Very long distribution lines may have several voltage regulators on the line. These do fail and the voltage may not regulate.

The electric power system is dynamic in that the voltage does fluctuate depending on many factors. The prevalent one is the loading on the line. If there is a large single load on the line, say a commercial/industrial facility, and something happens where the entire facility trips off line, the voltage will go high for a short period of time until voltage regulation can react and bring voltage back to normal. The reverse is true also.


Some transformers do have tap changers. Most of the time they are used for special situations. Not all that common on basic residential homes.
__________________
doodler
doodler is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
voltage

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:57 PM.