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Old 12-31-2022, 08:17 AM   #1
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Are manufacturers overcompensating on tires

So I just finished a 2k + mile trip only 1800 towing. I most likely double the amount of miles on the tires from new last year. I went through 3 tires in the last 250 miles of the trip. I had one replaced in Amarillo and the tire tech mentioned how it looked like it had been bouncing. The second was replaced in Lubbock this tire was still intact as the tech was pulling the old tire off he asked if they told me the tire needed replaced because it was bouncing. Both those tires were rear axle tires. I arrived home Thursday went to get ready to put trl in storage and third tire driver side front axle was flat.
Tire info 235 80 R 16 F Trailer King
Thatís 100psi per tire from side of tire vs the 80 psi 235 80 16 E rating I replaced the two tires with.
The listed dry weight of trl is basically 11k cargo of basically 4k so up to 15k but with 2500 to 3k pin weight carried by the truck. I travel light so other than cheap tires could the extra capacity of the tires be hurting me.

I am curious because I just yesterday I went to dealership to have work redone walked away with new trl 12k dry 15k capacity but it has 17.5 H rated tires and I donít want to go thru the episode again. Tire brand I believe is westlake
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Old 12-31-2022, 09:39 AM   #2
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You might save yourself some problems by having the tires balanced. Some will say trailer tires don't need to be balanced which if it works for them good. The cost to balance is small when compared to the cost of a tire. I balance all my trailer tires including my single axle trash trailer and have never experienced a problem cupping, bounce, or flats. JMHO
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Old 12-31-2022, 10:02 AM   #3
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Trailer Kings are one of the worst or the worst tires. Your best bet are Sailuns if you have 110psi wheels, and get them balanced. Does your rig look like it's nose high, which could explain excessive wear on rear axle tires?
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Old 12-31-2022, 10:13 AM   #4
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I'm not really understanding exactly what you are asking. Over compensating? If anything, the factory uses the bare minimum load range for the trailer weight. So going up a load range makes sense to me.
You don't say how old the failed tires were. I replace my fifth wheel tires ever 4 to 5 years.
When buying a new RV, I drive it straight to my trusted tire guy, replace the factory tires and usually go up a load range in the same size. I usually run the higher load range about 5 -10 psi higher than the lower load range. Weigh your RV and follow the load/psi charts. Ever since I have been doing this, all my tire problems stopped.
I have not had an RV yet that came with a brand and LR of tires I would consider actually using.
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Old 12-31-2022, 10:22 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by moose074 View Post
So I just finished a 2k + mile trip only 1800 towing. I most likely double the amount of miles on the tires from new last year. I went through 3 tires in the last 250 miles of the trip. I had one replaced in Amarillo and the tire tech mentioned how it looked like it had been bouncing. The second was replaced in Lubbock this tire was still intact as the tech was pulling the old tire off he asked if they told me the tire needed replaced because it was bouncing. Both those tires were rear axle tires. I arrived home Thursday went to get ready to put trl in storage and third tire driver side front axle was flat.
Tire info 235 80 R 16 F Trailer King
Thatís 100psi per tire from side of tire vs the 80 psi 235 80 16 E rating I replaced the two tires with.
The listed dry weight of trl is basically 11k cargo of basically 4k so up to 15k but with 2500 to 3k pin weight carried by the truck. I travel light so other than cheap tires could the extra capacity of the tires be hurting me.

I am curious because I just yesterday I went to dealership to have work redone walked away with new trl 12k dry 15k capacity but it has 17.5 H rated tires and I donít want to go thru the episode again. Tire brand I believe is westlake

Seems you replaced the F load rated tires with E load rated . you went down in load rating . Something i would never do equal or higher rated replacements only . problem was the trailer king tires and unbalanced.
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Old 12-31-2022, 10:43 AM   #6
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My opinion--yours may vary--especially when it comes to tires.
I think that trailer tires are over rated. You'll see that the same size tire in an ST will be rated for more weight than that size in an LT. Some have said the lower LT rating is because they carry passengers. Even though some trailer tire suppliers give a no hassel warranty, they still don't pay for trailer damage. I've never run OEM tires more than 3 months. Also, OEM trailer tire suppliers "balance" by placing the heavy side of the tire opposite the heavy side of the rim which is only better than nothing.

Many trailer tires are rated for 65 mph maybe because that's a government minimum regulation. I always run tires rated for more speed than that because it's a strong reflection of how much heat they can tolerate. I like a tire rated for more than 80 mph when I'm driving 65 mph as a safety margine. As mentioned above I try to size up for more load rating by going up a load range (C to D or E) or just a physically larger tire (235R80-16 to 235R85-16).

The best "brand" luck that I've had was with Goodrich Comp TA LTs. I've tried Goodyear Endurance and now I'm on Hankook Trailer tires. It was interesting that the OP had trouble first with the rear tires. I've recently become experienced in the fact that rear trailer tires wear faster than front ones, so I'm planning to rotate the Hankooks. All my replacement trailer tires are balanced dispite tire shop arguments that it's not needed.
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Old 12-31-2022, 10:48 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by NMWildcat View Post
I'm not really understanding exactly what you are asking. Over compensating? If anything, the factory uses the bare minimum load range for the trailer weight. So going up a load range makes sense to me.
You don't say how old the failed tires were. I replace my fifth wheel tires ever 4 to 5 years.
When buying a new RV, I drive it straight to my trusted tire guy, replace the factory tires and usually go up a load range in the same size. I usually run the higher load range about 5 -10 psi higher than the lower load range. Weigh your RV and follow the load/psi charts. Ever since I have been doing this, all my tire problems stopped.
I have not had an RV yet that came with a brand and LR of tires I would consider actually using.


So when the tire techs mentioned bouncing kinda of made me think of my truck tires. My front tires have 55 psi as recommended by ford but my rear are at 65 again recommend by ford. If Iím not towing I can drop my psi in the rear to 55 and smooth my ride tremendously. The E rated tires are rated at 3600 so basically 14,400 at 80 psi less bouncing and well within rated capacity of the trl. However the F rated tires say 100 psi rated at 15,500 which is 500 over the weight rating and by the time the pin is dropped the tires are probably holding only 13k at the most.

The tire are original to the trl if I remember correctly the date code had them April of 2021. Before I left the Grand Canyon the tires were balding bad in the center by the time I got back to Texas the wear bars in middle were flush or gone.

So going to new trl same basic weight but H rated tires I was wanting to avoid the same POSSIBLE problem.

You are correct on the charts and I will on the new.
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Old 12-31-2022, 11:19 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by phillyg View Post
Trailer Kings are one of the worst or the worst tires. Your best bet are Sailuns if you have 110psi wheels, and get them balanced. Does your rig look like it's nose high, which could explain excessive wear on rear axle tires?
I think I ride level I attached a pic. I looked up who made trailer kings and it looks like the same company that makes Sailuns. In the past I have always had good luck with the tires that came on my trls. That said in Lubbock they had one tire in my size that was f rated. I hadnít heard of the brand and the salesman went to verify he had it. While he was gone I looked at his computer screen it had one star. When he brought the tire in it looked like it already had a bulging sidewall on one side. So for 19 more I got the Goodyear endurance but in a E rating



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Old 12-31-2022, 02:31 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moose074 View Post
So I just finished a 2k + mile trip only 1800 towing. I most likely double the amount of miles on the tires from new last year. I went through 3 tires in the last 250 miles of the trip. I had one replaced in Amarillo and the tire tech mentioned how it looked like it had been bouncing. The second was replaced in Lubbock this tire was still intact as the tech was pulling the old tire off he asked if they told me the tire needed replaced because it was bouncing. Both those tires were rear axle tires. I arrived home Thursday went to get ready to put trl in storage and third tire driver side front axle was flat.
Tire info 235 80 R 16 F Trailer King
Thatís 100psi per tire from side of tire vs the 80 psi 235 80 16 E rating I replaced the two tires with.
The listed dry weight of trl is basically 11k cargo of basically 4k so up to 15k but with 2500 to 3k pin weight carried by the truck. I travel light so other than cheap tires could the extra capacity of the tires be hurting me.

I am curious because I just yesterday I went to dealership to have work redone walked away with new trl 12k dry 15k capacity but it has 17.5 H rated tires and I donít want to go thru the episode again. Tire brand I believe is westlake
Trailer King is your problem, not the load rating. I was in the tire business for over 30 years and always wanted to know the ďfailure rateĒ of some of the different brands. No such listing exists to my knowledge. But Iíll bet that if it did exist, there would be far fewer off-brand tire manufacturers. Either they would improve their products or go belly up. Obviously the brands with the higher failure rates donít want you to know, but the lower failure rate brands should wear that rate with pride.

Tire shop owners generally tell you their brand is the best. Consumer reports canít help because they just check for traction, handling, mileage, etc. They donít have access to failure rates. Too bad.

Now, Iím sure there will be some Trailer King tire owners who will now chime in saying how they had no problems for a million miles, etc. But youíve gotta look at the whole picture (the forest) not just a few trees.
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Old 12-31-2022, 02:53 PM   #10
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Seems you replaced the F load rated tires with E load rated . you went down in load rating . Something i would never do equal or higher rated replacements only . problem was the trailer king tires and unbalanced.
I disagree with this statement. No need to continue to use tires that are harder than necessary, it will lead to more wear on everything and beat up the trailer more than needed. Buy based on the load regardless what kind of deal the OEM got on the tires they put on it. Just my opinion of course, but this would be like putting 8k axles on a 6k trailer, it will ride unnecessarily rougher than it should.
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Old 12-31-2022, 03:52 PM   #11
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IMHO: Trailer out of level will only wear the rear tires faster if it has rubber torshion axles (or it is crazy high in the front.) OP's picture shows steel springs with an equalizer. The equalizer will distribut the weight between the axles. My 37' fifth wheel (similar to the OP's picture) is 1" high in the front, but the tires weigh the same on one side and 50 lbs. different on the other side--so virtually the same per axle. Yet my rear tires wore out twice as fast as the front (dispite being the vanted Goodyear Equalizer tires.) Convential wisdom is that the rear tires get more sideways scrubbing than the fronts. That is why I will rotate.
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Old 12-31-2022, 04:47 PM   #12
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Scrubbing

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Originally Posted by wheelin14 View Post
IMHO: Trailer out of level will only wear the rear tires faster if it has rubber torshion axles (or it is crazy high in the front.) OP's picture shows steel springs with an equalizer. The equalizer will distribut the weight between the axles. My 37' fifth wheel (similar to the OP's picture) is 1" high in the front, but the tires weigh the same on one side and 50 lbs. different on the other side--so virtually the same per axle. Yet my rear tires wore out twice as fast as the front (dispite being the vanted Goodyear Equalizer tires.) Convential wisdom is that the rear tires get more sideways scrubbing than the fronts. That is why I will rotate.
Scrubbing, for those who don't know, refers to what happens with a two-axle trailer when you make a sharp turn, going forward or backward, at low- or high-speed. The trailer pivots on the tires on the front axle and drags the tires on the back axle sideways. Not only does this scrub the tread, but it strains the sidewalls. ST-class tires may have special construction to account for this.
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Old 12-31-2022, 09:38 PM   #13
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Scrubbing, for those who don't know, refers to what happens with a two-axle trailer when you make a sharp turn, going forward or backward, at low- or high-speed. The trailer pivots on the tires on the front axle and drags the tires on the back axle sideways. Not only does this scrub the tread, but it strains the sidewalls. ST-class tires may have special construction to account for this.
I can add one more item to the list of things I have learned today. Thank you
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Old 12-31-2022, 09:42 PM   #14
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My opinion--yours may vary--especially when it comes to tires.
I think that trailer tires are over rated. You'll see that the same size tire in an ST will be rated for more weight than that size in an LT. Some have said the lower LT rating is because they carry passengers. Even though some trailer tire suppliers give a no hassel warranty, they still don't pay for trailer damage. I've never run OEM tires more than 3 months. Also, OEM trailer tire suppliers "balance" by placing the heavy side of the tire opposite the heavy side of the rim which is only better than nothing.

Many trailer tires are rated for 65 mph maybe because that's a government minimum regulation. I always run tires rated for more speed than that because it's a strong reflection of how much heat they can tolerate. I like a tire rated for more than 80 mph when I'm driving 65 mph as a safety margine. As mentioned above I try to size up for more load rating by going up a load range (C to D or E) or just a physically larger tire (235R80-16 to 235R85-16).

The best "brand" luck that I've had was with Goodrich Comp TA LTs. I've tried Goodyear Endurance and now I'm on Hankook Trailer tires. It was interesting that the OP had trouble first with the rear tires. I've recently become experienced in the fact that rear trailer tires wear faster than front ones, so I'm planning to rotate the Hankooks. All my replacement trailer tires are balanced dispite tire shop arguments that it's not needed.


Thank you I hadnít considered truck tires, I appreciate your response. My goal is to make sure I learn from my mistakes or lack of knowledge so I welcome the response
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Old 12-31-2022, 09:45 PM   #15
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I disagree with this statement. No need to continue to use tires that are harder than necessary, it will lead to more wear on everything and beat up the trailer more than needed. Buy based on the load regardless what kind of deal the OEM got on the tires they put on it. Just my opinion of course, but this would be like putting 8k axles on a 6k trailer, it will ride unnecessarily rougher than it should.


That was my concern I want to ensure the tire has adequate capacity but concerned that I would be beating up the trailer and adding to tread wear problems
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Old 12-31-2022, 09:48 PM   #16
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This was the good tire that made it home before going flat.
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Old 12-31-2022, 09:53 PM   #17
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Trailer King is your problem, not the load rating. I was in the tire business for over 30 years and always wanted to know the ďfailure rateĒ of some of the different brands. No such listing exists to my knowledge. But Iíll bet that if it did exist, there would be far fewer off-brand tire manufacturers. Either they would improve their products or go belly up. Obviously the brands with the higher failure rates donít want you to know, but the lower failure rate brands should wear that rate with pride.



Tire shop owners generally tell you their brand is the best. Consumer reports canít help because they just check for traction, handling, mileage, etc. They donít have access to failure rates. Too bad.



Now, Iím sure there will be some Trailer King tire owners who will now chime in saying how they had no problems for a million miles, etc. But youíve gotta look at the whole picture (the forest) not just a few trees.


Thank you I knew the brand might be playing a major role but I noticed that the company that made them also makes the second most recommended tire ( based on my reading) plus both techs talked about tire bouncing.
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Old 12-31-2022, 10:08 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by moose074 View Post
Attachment 282745

This was the good tire that made it home before going flat.
Take note of the uneven tread wear side to side. You clearly have an alignment issue.



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Old 12-31-2022, 10:12 PM   #19
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Seems you replaced the F load rated tires with E load rated . you went down in load rating . Something i would never do equal or higher rated replacements only . problem was the trailer king tires and unbalanced.


I originally asked for an F rated tire that discount tire store had 3 options in my tire size. Only one was F rated an Atlas tire I believe, it had one star was $190 the Goodyear was E rated had three stars was $209. I chose the Goodyear. When I replaced my second tire I just skipped the asking of options went straight to do you have my size in a Goodyear.
I travel extremely light when I emptied my trailer today took maybe 35-40 minutes. I had 3 zero gravity chairs and my fresh water hose in the front storage area. Other than the bedding in the master bedroom I only carry my c pap and the exact amount of clothing needed for the trip. Bathroom spare tp and medicine cabinet mostly full of deodorant, soap ect. Kitchen area maybe 6 pot pans combination. Two sets of the 4 piece plastic cup and plate packs from wal mart two coffee pots, basic cooking utensils. Bunk house daughters clothes for trips and bedding. That is basically it. Very light
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Old 01-01-2023, 08:31 AM   #20
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Tire picture looks like a possible axle camber problem, but I'd get good tires first, and see how they wear. While ST tires are built for scrubbing, LT tires also have strong sidewalls, but have lower lb. ratings for the same size. LT versus ST is a popcorn and beer thread.
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