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Old 04-03-2020, 05:53 PM   #21
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Have you looked at the seals used in the EZ-Lube hubs?

They're built just like the seals in the end of a hydraulic cylinder, not your flabby single lip seals that were never built to withstand any pressure.

Only time pressure can really build up behind the seal is if one is using a powered grease gun that can deliver grease faster than it bleeds back through the bearings. It also isn't a problem if one uses the correct grease.
I will add that ..I jackup each wheel and have someone turn wheel while I
S-L-O-W-L-Y pump grease in Best to do right after a trip when grease is warmed up
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Old 04-03-2020, 07:34 PM   #22
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I call EZ-Lube LAZ-Lube. For people who are too lazy to pull their drum. Dexter suggested maintenance says to pull the drum at 1 year or 12K miles...whichever comes first. I never use the LAZ-Lube method. I want to inspect my bearings and brakes annually.
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Old 04-03-2020, 08:00 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
Have you looked at the seals used in the EZ-Lube hubs?

They're built just like the seals in the end of a hydraulic cylinder, not your flabby single lip seals that were never built to withstand any pressure.

Only time pressure can really build up behind the seal is if one is using a powered grease gun that can deliver grease faster than it bleeds back through the bearings. It also isn't a problem if one uses the correct grease.


Yes. A hand pump grease gun will put out 15,000 psi most seals are rated at 500psi. Nowhere close to a fair fight.
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Old 04-03-2020, 08:12 PM   #24
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Yes. A hand pump grease gun will put out 15,000 psi most seals are rated at 500psi. Nowhere close to a fair fight.
you won't see anywhere that psi if passages are not blocked . using the ez lube correctly will not harm anything . since i use the ez lube between full packs and seal replacement i know for sure they work . never had grease blow by the seal . those that have issues are either not doing it correctly , still have org seals which dexter / lippert seals are junk . once the hub is pulled and good seals installed using the ez lube between full packs is not a problem
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Old 04-03-2020, 08:15 PM   #25
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you won't see anywhere that psi if passages are not blocked . using the ez lube correctly will not harm anything . since i use the ez lube between full packs and seal replacement i know for sure they work . never had grease blow by the seal . those that have issues are either not doing it correctly , still have org seals which dexter / lippert seals are junk . once the hub is pulled and good seals installed using the ez lube between full packs is not a problem


I agree if everything’s working properly you should never blow the seal.
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Old 04-03-2020, 08:30 PM   #26
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Yes. A hand pump grease gun will put out 15,000 psi most seals are rated at 500psi. Nowhere close to a fair fight.
No way a hand pump will deliver enough volume to build anywhere near 500# pressure. Remember, there are gaps between rollers that let the grease pass.

Sorry, only powered grease guns can build any pressure between rear bearing and seal.
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Old 04-03-2020, 08:42 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
Have you looked at the seals used in the EZ-Lube hubs?

They're built just like the seals in the end of a hydraulic cylinder, not your flabby single lip seals that were never built to withstand any pressure.
The seals on my tt with ez lube are the exact same ones as on my previous tt without ez lube.
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Old 04-03-2020, 09:31 PM   #28
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I agree if everything’s working properly you should never blow the seal.


Thats the point of pulling the hub to makesure everything is working properly.I have a 2018 5th wheel and have had a blown seal... clip came off the magnet and it came loose and jammed in the drum....and the brake shoe pin that holds it in place came loose...ruined the star wheel adjuster....As cheep as these are made I'm always checking the wheels and hubs....One less thing to worry about. Happy Trails.....
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Old 04-03-2020, 10:25 PM   #29
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What you describe sounds suspiciously like improper adjustment which overheated the bearing and also caused it to stick to the spindle (burnt grease). Your prying to remove the hub is more likely the cause of the seal not remaining in the hub.

Considering the force usually required to both install and pull a seal (if using the proper sized seal to begin with) I doubt many seals are actually pushed out by using the EZ-Lube system PROPERLY.
The rear seal was not pushed out by anything . It was in place and actually held in the hub It was the bearing stuck to the spindle, with the seal behind it that prevented the hub being removed easily.

The seal came out of the hub specifically because I pried on the hub and thereby pulled the seal free of the hub allowing hub removal. I then had to pry the inner bearing off of the spindle.

If you feel the EZ Lube is for you , kindly ignore my post, I cannot change your mind, nor would I want to. I was pointing out why I NEVER WILL!

Good Luck to you! I might point out the value of the first line in our signature though,
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Old 04-03-2020, 10:50 PM   #30
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If one knows what they are doing, there's no doubt a complete repack and inspection is best.
However, many owners do not and even many shops get it wrong. Especially when it comes to the proper technique for tightening the hub nut.
One claim I have heard over and over is that when the grease gets hot, it will expand and push through the seal and onto the brakes. I call BS on that. If the grease somehow got hot enough to expand (which it will not unless there's a bearing failure) it would follow the path of least resistance which is through the EZ lube channel towards the outside of the hub.
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Old 04-04-2020, 04:21 AM   #31
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If one knows what they are doing, there's no doubt a complete repack and inspection is best.
However, many owners do not and even many shops get it wrong. Especially when it comes to the proper technique for tightening the hub nut.
One claim I have heard over and over is that when the grease gets hot, it will expand and push through the seal and onto the brakes. I call BS on that. If the grease somehow got hot enough to expand (which it will not unless there's a bearing failure) it would follow the path of least resistance which is through the EZ lube channel towards the outside of the hub.
Except that the Zerk fitting on the end of the hub has a one way ball as a check valve, it cannot come out that route, unless that Zerk is defective.

and ANY tire shop knows how to repack bearings
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Old 04-04-2020, 05:26 AM   #32
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Except that the Zerk fitting on the end of the hub has a one way ball as a check valve, it cannot come out that route, unless that Zerk is defective.

and ANY tire shop knows how to repack bearings
Well, when I have used the system, the grease actually flows out to the outside of the hub as the new grease is pumped in. That's the route the supposed super heated and expanding grease would follow. That is if that actually could happen.

Sounds like you have never tried the system.

ANY tire shop knows how to repack bearings??

Thanks for the laugh during these tough times.

I will give you this much... you did not call it a zert!

Have a nice day
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Old 04-04-2020, 06:10 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
Have you looked at the seals used in the EZ-Lube hubs?

They're built just like the seals in the end of a hydraulic cylinder, not your flabby single lip seals that were never built to withstand any pressure.

Only time pressure can really build up behind the seal is if one is using a powered grease gun that can deliver grease faster than it bleeds back through the bearings. It also isn't a problem if one uses the correct grease.
I've never had a problem with the EZ lube hubs. I just go easy and take my time. Maybe some of us are just luckier than others???? By the way, how often do you repack your bearings?
Mike
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Old 04-04-2020, 08:08 AM   #34
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Thumbs up to EZ lube !
Jack the trailer up, spin the tire , slowly pump the grease in and scrape the old grease out.
Never had a issue in 6 years.
We always take our 1st trip within 100 miles and Grease the bearings after the 1st trip.
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Old 04-04-2020, 02:13 PM   #35
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Just an observation - the success of EZ Lube seems to be dependent on the "skill" of the person doing the lube job. Many succeed, some fail. It is quicker and not as messy as hand packing.

Hand packing doesn't require as much "skill", but it does require determination to actually pack the grease into the bearing and not just smear it around. The bonus for hand packing bearings is that you get to examine all the parts and the brakes while you have it apart.

just my observations
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Old 04-04-2020, 02:19 PM   #36
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Just an observation - the success of EZ Lube seems to be dependent on the "skill" of the person doing the lube job. Many succeed, some fail. It is quicker and not as messy as hand packing.

Hand packing doesn't require as much "skill", but it does require determination to actually pack the grease into the bearing and not just smear it around. The bonus for hand packing bearings is that you get to examine all the parts and the brakes while you have it apart.

just my observations
Fred W
2019 Flagstaff T21TBHW A-frame (hand packed bearings after 8 months, will redo in 3 years unless brakes dictate sooner)

There's no reason why one can't still remove the hub, pop out the rear seal, remove bearings and wipe clean for inspection. Then merely re-install with new seal, assemble, and rather than smearing grease into the bearings, just use the E-Z Lube system until grease starts to show at the front bearing.

No mess, no fuss, and if the bearings are properly adjusted, no problems.


FWIW, your first sentence applies to any repair/maintenance operation.
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Old 04-05-2020, 06:21 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by raytwntrvlr View Post
Well, when I have used the system, the grease actually flows out to the outside of the hub as the new grease is pumped in. That's the route the supposed super heated and expanding grease would follow. That is if that actually could happen.

Sounds like you have never tried the system.

ANY tire shop knows how to repack bearings??

Thanks for the laugh during these tough times.

I will give you this much... you did not call it a zert!

Have a nice day
You are right Ive never used the system, but Ive disassembled the wheels to inspect them when purchased used. The vast majority have had grease on the brake shoes and the hub where the magnet rides. One of them had 3 wheels out of 4 with a coating of grease 1/4" thick on the entire inside. That was enough for me to refer back to what my father taught me how to do when I was 10 or so. those skills and knowledge have served me well all my life.

Just a question about that old grease, where does it actually go? When and where does it ever exit the hub?

Since grease is not consumed in use, it is still there, dirty and contaminated but still there nonetheless. Eventually the volume of grease in the hub will exceed the volume of the interior of the hub. Where does it go then?

More often than not, it goes past the rear seal and onto the brake system (NOT GOOD)

PS, I have never been sarcastic, belittled or condescending to you. Kindly refrain from any of those negative and unattractive traits or I will happily place you on my ignore list.


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Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
There's no reason why one can't still remove the hub, pop out the rear seal, remove bearings and wipe clean for inspection. Then merely re-install with new seal, assemble, and rather than smearing grease into the bearings, just use the E-Z Lube system until grease starts to show at the front bearing.

No mess, no fuss, and if the bearings are properly adjusted, no problems.


FWIW, your first sentence applies to any repair/maintenance operation.
If you are going to go to all that work and inspect the bearings, races and spindle you have to actually degrease each one to inspect it properly. Might as well grease it before you install it.

If you dont want to get the grease on your hands, wear Nitril Gloves and use one of a couple types of tools that push the grease into the bearings.

One of them uses a grease gun to pump it into the bearing in the tool....(This would actually satisfy those with a grease gun fetish as far as bearing lubrication goes)

My last statement on this is, yawl do what you want. In the very first post I laid out what I found, what the experts at the trailer manufacturing company told me and my opinion.

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.............Maybe some of us are just luckier than others???? By the way, how often do you repack your bearings?
Mike
I don't want to trust to luck where money and safety are concerned.

Once a year, Usually as soon as I get a nice day when Im off hitch. I grease the Sidewinder Fifth Wheel pin arm and wheel bearings int he same day.

One last observation, I understand there are now axles that use sealed bearings that do not require repacking. Id LOVE those, my truck has them on the front wheels..........maybe on my next camper?
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Old 04-05-2020, 09:36 AM   #38
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When it all works as advertised, the old grease exits the hub at the axle nut.
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Old 04-05-2020, 10:06 AM   #39
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FWIW, your first sentence applies to any repair/maintenance operation.
No Mike, I disagree. There are way too many reports of problems using the EZ Lube method. It obviously takes skill or luck to avoid the problems.

The "critical" points in hand packing are forcing the grease into the bearing, and re-seating the hub. There doesn't seem to be near the failures in doing these tasks as with the EZ Lube.

Obviously many succeed with EZ Lube, but just like with "China bomb" tires, there are enough reported failures to give one pause.

As for repacking interval, unless there are issues - brakes, wheel temps, tires - I see no reason to repack bearings more than every 3 years after the initial repack in the 1st year. My A-frame is single axle, stored in the garage which doesn't go below freezing, and makes at best 12 trips a year averaging less than a thousand miles per trip. Our roads are generally not cratered like some places. If there is an issue, then I might as well repack while I am resolving the issue. Dual axles, stored outside in freezing temps, more pot holes, more use would be reasons to consider repacking more frequently.

just my thoughts
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Old 04-05-2020, 11:01 AM   #40
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easy lube hubs

i use this method . there is only 1 hole the grease to comes out of , So, pump 4 strokes all hubs. start at 12 o'clock, pull trailer up to 3o'clock.3 pumps, etc till back at 12o'clock. then a couple of pumps each. used this technique for years and never had a problem .From my understanding the shaft throws the grease from the back bearing to the front bearing for lubrication.
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