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Old 04-15-2021, 07:36 PM   #1
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Keeping spare wheel bearings and seals on hand

I have a question that maybe someone can answer or direct me in the right direction. I have 2019 Flagstaff 8529IKBS 5th wheel. I think about greasing my bearing's myself using the easy lube system. But I would like to keep on hand spare bearing's and seals just incase. What size bearing's and or seals do I buy or how can I tell what number to use to order them?
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Old 04-15-2021, 07:53 PM   #2
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Start with the information on the axles themselves. There is a label on the axle, usually back side. It will give you the weight rating. Then you can purchase inner/outer bearings and seal to fit.

Places like e-trailer.com or Dexter usually have the part numbers listed on their website and using those numbers can often find at local auto parts stores, Amazon, etc.

With the Ez-lube system just make sure you are getting as double lipped seal.

BTW, having a set of spare bearings is a good idea. In my case i have 2 sets and haven't needed them. Years ago I was toing a friends trailef and a bearing went out. Took hours to find a replacement.
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Old 04-16-2021, 10:01 AM   #3
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Helped

Thanks, that helps a lot, will go and find those numbers today.
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Old 04-16-2021, 10:31 AM   #4
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Yep... get the info off the axles.
I have a 2016 8529IKBS and I emailed that tag info to Dexter.
They sent me all the information for seals, bearings and brakes. Nice folks.
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Old 04-16-2021, 01:49 PM   #5
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FYI on warranty Issues on Dexter wheels

Thanks for the information that everyone sent me. Called Dexter with me information and they were very good on helping find the right parts. Now FYI I explained to the representative that I just want spare Bearings just in case. I told her that I was just going grease the bearings using there Ez-lube system, she said that was fine except that if this was my first time within 12 months, that to keep the warranty enforced that I had to physically take the bearings out and inspect them. She also explained that I needed to take pictures and have receipts from parts that I would buy, I.e. seals, grease and so forth, so If I did have and issue down the road they would or maybe honor the claim. I did not realize this important clause in there Warranty paper work. She did say that not many people know this. So hope this helps someone else.
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Old 04-16-2021, 06:45 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Ozziee View Post
Thanks for the information that everyone sent me. Called Dexter with me information and they were very good on helping find the right parts. Now FYI I explained to the representative that I just want spare Bearings just in case. I told her that I was just going grease the bearings using there Ez-lube system, she said that was fine except that if this was my first time within 12 months, that to keep the warranty enforced that I had to physically take the bearings out and inspect them. She also explained that I needed to take pictures and have receipts from parts that I would buy, I.e. seals, grease and so forth, so If I did have and issue down the road they would or maybe honor the claim. I did not realize this important clause in there Warranty paper work. She did say that not many people know this. So hope this helps someone else.
Just keep in mind that if you replace a bad bearing you have to replace the race as well. Sometimes the bearings and races come in sets, other times they're separate items.
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Old 04-17-2021, 09:05 AM   #7
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The thought that you would change bearings somewhere on the road just isn't likely. A:Trailer bearings and seals are commonly available at most auto parts stores. B: As others have said, you need to change the races which can be difficult sitting by the side of the road. Who carries punches and a vice to hold the drum/hub assembly. C: Most bearing failures also go along with spindle damage, so even if you can replace the bearing, very often the spindle will be damaged to the point you can't remount the hub anyway. You might be able to limp it off of the highway, but you could probably do that with the bad bearing.
The guy that carries some spares, and thinks that pumping the hubs full of grease, and never dismantles, inspects, packs, replaces seals, adjusts brakes, looks over the suspension, annually or semi-annually, is the guy that has a false sense of security. The guy that truly performs the maintenance above will rarely, if ever have a bearing failure. That guy is also the guy that checks the temperature of the hubs at every stop, and is aware if a brake shoe is dragging etc. I'm all about being prepared, but simply carrying a bunch of spare parts doesn't constitute being prepared in my eyes. Doing the preventative work in advance is being prepared.
Bearing maintenance is a messy, sometimes overwhelming job for some. I understand that, but it's a part of trailer ownership that just can't be avoided unless you buy a trailer with sealed bearing units, and those are rare, and come with issues of their own. Carry the bearings if it makes you feel more secure, but don't fail to do the things that will truly prevent mishaps on the road.
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Old 04-17-2021, 04:47 PM   #8
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Who carries punches and a vice to hold the drum/hub assembly.
I actually am one of those guys. A tapered punch with flat nose, a claw hammer, and even a seal driver which doubles as a driver for the new race.

I use them at home whenever I replace bearings and since the trailer is the ONLY place I need them (now) I just store it in my TT's toolbox.

FWIW, I can't ever recall using a vise to hold a drum/hub assy even in classes I frequently taught in my career. In classrooms the drum/hub just sat on the workbench with a couple of 4X4 spacers.. I often just use a board on the ground or on my tailgate when doing it at home now with trailer sitting on it's pad.

I've never had to change a bearing on the side of a highway but I do recall doing it in a parking lot near an off ramp. (friend's trailer, not mine).

If you have the parts and tools it's not a daunting task. Just make sure you have a fresh roll of "shop towels"
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Old 04-18-2021, 07:31 AM   #9
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I actually am one of those guys. A tapered punch with flat nose, a claw hammer, and even a seal driver which doubles as a driver for the new race.

I use them at home whenever I replace bearings and since the trailer is the ONLY place I need them (now) I just store it in my TT's toolbox.

FWIW, I can't ever recall using a vise to hold a drum/hub assy even in classes I frequently taught in my career. In classrooms the drum/hub just sat on the workbench with a couple of 4X4 spacers.. I often just use a board on the ground or on my tailgate when doing it at home now with trailer sitting on it's pad.

I've never had to change a bearing on the side of a highway but I do recall doing it in a parking lot near an off ramp. (friend's trailer, not mine).

If you have the parts and tools it's not a daunting task. Just make sure you have a fresh roll of "shop towels"
Somehow Mike I think I already figured you were the guy that would have all that stuff. I hope you're the guy that stops to help me when I'm on the side of the road. Actually I agree that it isn't terribly difficult. My point to the OP was that maintenance is more important than spare parts. I doubt a lot of RV people out there would truly be capable of a roadside bearing change. With proper maintenance it would be a very rare occurrence. My impression of his post was that he considered the EZ LUbes to be adequate greasing for the bearings. While they are good for use in between packs, nothing is better than tear down, inspect, pack, reassemble. Do it at home, so you don't have to do it on the road.
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Old 04-18-2021, 12:30 PM   #10
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Just keep in mind that bearings are sensitive items and can easily be damaged by being mishandled. They are supposed to be stored laying flat and should not be exposed to vibrations. Bearings rattling around in a toolbox or vehicle is not a good idea for the life of a bearing.
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Old 04-18-2021, 06:49 PM   #11
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Just keep in mind that bearings are sensitive items and can easily be damaged by being mishandled. They are supposed to be stored laying flat and should not be exposed to vibrations. Bearings rattling around in a toolbox or vehicle is not a good idea for the life of a bearing.
These are WHEEL bearings, not WATCH bearings.

In over 60 years I have yet to see a fragile or sensitive wheel bearing. Remember, if you drive down the road in a pickup truck and hit a pothole, the wheel bearing was just subjected to thousands of pounds of shock force as the weight it's supporting was most likely around a ton.

Only thing that ruins bearings in your tool box is rust. But even a rusty bearing can be cleaned enough to get your vehicle off the highway to a safe place and a new part.
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Old 04-18-2021, 07:00 PM   #12
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Somehow Mike I think I already figured you were the guy that would have all that stuff. I hope you're the guy that stops to help me when I'm on the side of the road. Actually I agree that it isn't terribly difficult. My point to the OP was that maintenance is more important than spare parts. I doubt a lot of RV people out there would truly be capable of a roadside bearing change. With proper maintenance it would be a very rare occurrence. My impression of his post was that he considered the EZ LUbes to be adequate greasing for the bearings. While they are good for use in between packs, nothing is better than tear down, inspect, pack, reassemble. Do it at home, so you don't have to do it on the road.
Absolutely. It's in my DNA. And if I have the necessary part, it's yours.

I totally agree that PROPER maintenance prevents most problems but as I said, since I only use the tools on my TT, why not store them (all 2# of them) in the TT where they will be available for future maintenance or emergency repairs (mine or someone I'm helping).

As for stopping and helping when I can, in all my years I've been on the receiving end of such assistance so I'm just paying it all back where possible
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Old 04-18-2021, 07:16 PM   #13
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I farmed for most of my life and spare bearing kits have saved us on the side of the road many times. You can do maintenance all you want but you can't tell a bearing was poorly made or will develop an issue while in use. If you know how to do it and have the tools, there is zero harm in having a bearing kit (all of our trailers did) and a slight chance it might save you several hours waiting for help. Granted our trailers were hauling more weight, more often and in worse conditions but assuming someone is too inept to change them on the side of the road is just arrogant. It's like telling someone not to carry extra water into the desert during a 30 minute visit. Probably will never need it, but what if you do?
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Old 04-18-2021, 07:39 PM   #14
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I farmed for most of my life and spare bearing kits have saved us on the side of the road many times. You can do maintenance all you want but you can't tell a bearing was poorly made or will develop an issue while in use. If you know how to do it and have the tools, there is zero harm in having a bearing kit (all of our trailers did) and a slight chance it might save you several hours waiting for help. Granted our trailers were hauling more weight, more often and in worse conditions but assuming someone is too inept to change them on the side of the road is just arrogant. It's like telling someone not to carry extra water into the desert during a 30 minute visit. Probably will never need it, but what if you do?
I think that with travel trailers there is a greater number of people that don't have the knowledge necessary for roadside repairs. Many can't even change a tire.

Also, roadside repairs can be extremely dangerous if you are all alone. Having someone stop behind you can increase survival chances by providing at the very least enough presence to get people to slow and even move over. Also someone to watch traffic and shout a warning rather than being blind to oncoming danger while you have your back turned.

Many people are in total fear if they have to pull over and stand on the shoulder.

Farmers (I grew up on a farm) tend to be more self sufficient and aware of dangers.
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Old 04-18-2021, 07:48 PM   #15
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I keep a extra set of greased bearings in the trucks tool box along with a hub, no drum, as a emergency kit. Be sure to pack some old tee shirts for rags and a nice piece of emery cloth to clean up a burned axle.
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Old 04-18-2021, 07:50 PM   #16
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I think that with travel trailers there is a greater number of people that don't have the knowledge necessary for roadside repairs. Many can't even change a tire.

Also, roadside repairs can be extremely dangerous if you are all alone. Having someone stop behind you can increase survival chances by providing at the very least enough presence to get people to slow and even move over. Also someone to watch traffic and shout a warning rather than being blind to oncoming danger while you have your back turned.

Many people are in total fear if they have to pull over and stand on the shoulder.

Farmers (I grew up on a farm) tend to be more self sufficient and aware of dangers.

Different circles I guess. Here in the south, even the ladies can change a tire if they have to - not many after hours shops out here. We camp with a group of 20, everyone except one lady who is over 80 would rather do their own maintenance roadside than wait hours for someone else. I guess it's just who ya know is who ya base your opinions on. I'm sure there are thousands of folks out there in other areas who can't change a tire - that's why many new cars don't come with a spare!
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Old 04-18-2021, 08:33 PM   #17
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Different circles I guess. Here in the south, even the ladies can change a tire if they have to - not many after hours shops out here. We camp with a group of 20, everyone except one lady who is over 80 would rather do their own maintenance roadside than wait hours for someone else. I guess it's just who ya know is who ya base your opinions on. I'm sure there are thousands of folks out there in other areas who can't change a tire - that's why many new cars don't come with a spare!
When I was growing up all of us kids had to show our Dad we knew how to change a tire before we got to drive the family car on our own.

Fast forward and while driving home from school in Florida my grandson called his Dad from the middle of South Dakota needing instructions on how to change a tire.

Things change as do the generations.

How many times do we read here how people say "I'll just call road service?
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Old 04-21-2021, 08:32 AM   #18
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Different circles I guess. Here in the south, even the ladies can change a tire if they have to - not many after hours shops out here. We camp with a group of 20, everyone except one lady who is over 80 would rather do their own maintenance roadside than wait hours for someone else. I guess it's just who ya know is who ya base your opinions on. I'm sure there are thousands of folks out there in other areas who can't change a tire - that's why many new cars don't come with a spare!
Heard that! My Granddaughter just bought a new car. In the well where the spare tire should be was a 12V compressor and a canister of fix-a-flat. She told the dealer to throw in a tire and wheel, or she was going to walk away. They gave her a new full size tire and wheel! It won't fit in the well, but her trunk is big enough.
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Old 04-21-2021, 08:52 AM   #19
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In addition to bearing, seals and grease, I carry an entire hub fully assembled and ready to install. Usually, the hub will start heating up if the bearing starts giving out. Whenever I stop for any reason whether it be fuel, food, bathroom or just a stretch of the legs, I will walk around my camper with a laser thermometer and check every hub. If they all measure the same approximate temperature then all is well. If one reads warmer than the others, I will then proceed to remove the tire and hub for an inspection and possible replacement.
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Old 04-21-2021, 09:18 AM   #20
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Absolutely. It's in my DNA. And if I have the necessary part, it's yours.

I totally agree that PROPER maintenance prevents most problems but as I said, since I only use the tools on my TT, why not store them (all 2# of them) in the TT where they will be available for future maintenance or emergency repairs (mine or someone I'm helping).

As for stopping and helping when I can, in all my years I've been on the receiving end of such assistance so I'm just paying it all back where possible
I try to maintain the same attitude. If more people did, it would be a better world.
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