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Old 10-21-2020, 05:39 PM   #1
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New tire air pressure

So after having a blowout on a six month old China bomb on my brand new trailer I decided to upgrade to the Goodyear endurance. My original tires had a maximum air pressure rating of 65 psi which agrees with the data plate on the trailer itself. The new tires have a maximum air pressure of 90. So my question is obviously do I keep those at 90 or do I run with the 65 psi as the trailer tag states.? My thinking is if I put 65 in tires that are rated at 90 that they would be running soft and will heat up more.
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Old 10-21-2020, 05:51 PM   #2
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Inflate ST tires to the maximum cold sidewall pressure otherwise they'll run soft, flex, and heat up.

There will be 30 guys dispute this. Ignore them.

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Old 10-21-2020, 07:57 PM   #3
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I agree max PSI. Helps with heat, sidewall flex, and road damage.
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Old 10-21-2020, 08:00 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by jjcooler65 View Post
So after having a blowout on a six month old China bomb on my brand new trailer I decided to upgrade to the Goodyear endurance. My original tires had a maximum air pressure rating of 65 psi which agrees with the data plate on the trailer itself. The new tires have a maximum air pressure of 90. So my question is obviously do I keep those at 90 or do I run with the 65 psi as the trailer tag states.? My thinking is if I put 65 in tires that are rated at 90 that they would be running soft and will heat up more.


Check the Goodyear RV inflation chart for the correct pressure based on load. Let the tire engineers be the experts.
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Old 10-21-2020, 09:16 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Traveling Circus View Post
Check the Goodyear RV inflation chart for the correct pressure based on load. Let the tire engineers be the experts.
Yeah. Go with the engineers. Of course, to use the tables, you have to know the loads on your tires. That takes effort.

Or you can just air up to the max and skip all that annoying weighing and knowing.
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Old 10-22-2020, 10:03 AM   #6
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Yeah. Go with the engineers. Of course, to use the tables, you have to know the loads on your tires. That takes effort.

Or you can just air up to the max and skip all that annoying weighing and knowing.
And then watch in the rear view mirror how the trailer tires bounce 6 inches or more off the road when you hit a bump.

In the case of the OP's tires we're talking more than a 50% OVERINFLATION for the actual load.

I wouldn't go more than 20% over the inflation pressure shown in the chart for the tire size and actual load.
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Old 10-22-2020, 11:42 AM   #7
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And then watch in the rear view mirror how the trailer tires bounce 6 inches or more off the road when you hit a bump.

In the case of the OP's tires we're talking more than a 50% OVERINFLATION for the actual load.

I wouldn't go more than 20% over the inflation pressure shown in the chart for the tire size and actual load.
Yes, overinflation is far less dangerous than underinflation, but correct inflation for the load (possibly with a reasonable buffer for a potential increase in load occurring before there is a chance to reweigh) is best.

Even if one chooses to air up to the max, one should read the tables to fully understand what airing up to the max means, including the possibility of creating a 50% buffer, as you cite.

Choose to know.
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Old 10-22-2020, 12:05 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jjcooler65 View Post
So after having a blowout on a six month old China bomb on my brand new trailer I decided to upgrade to the Goodyear endurance. My original tires had a maximum air pressure rating of 65 psi which agrees with the data plate on the trailer itself. The new tires have a maximum air pressure of 90. So my question is obviously do I keep those at 90 or do I run with the 65 psi as the trailer tag states.? My thinking is if I put 65 in tires that are rated at 90 that they would be running soft and will heat up more.
What is the designated size of the OE tires and their replacements?
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Old 10-23-2020, 03:32 PM   #9
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Tires

Now that I have tire pressure sensors on, I notice the pressure goes up 5-6 pounds on the side that gets sun or when weather changes I upgraded my tires in load and size and run what the GY chart says plus a little. I stay close to what the original trailer specs were. I have never seen my trailer "bounce 6" off the ground LOL.
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Old 10-23-2020, 05:32 PM   #10
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Running at 65 PSI is probably sufficient to meet the load requirement of your trailer and shouldn't be too soft or cause the tires to heat up. With that said I made the same switch earlier this year. I tried a stretch of towing at both 65 and 90 PSI. I found the trailer was more "squirrelly" running at 65 especially on grooved pavement, so I now run at 90 PSI. Haven't experienced the trailer bouncing 6" on bumps any more than it did at 65 PSI.
Tire engineer who has posted most on RV tire issues is Roger Marble, here is a blog he posted on the issue.
https://www.rvtiresafety.net/2020/08...ssure-and.html


I found the end of the post a bit confusing and asked about it. Roger's clarification was to get the most relief from inter-ply shear, run tow-able trailers at the tire's max cold inflation pressure, especially if you have multiple trailer axles.
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Old 10-23-2020, 05:53 PM   #11
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FWIW.
If you call Goodyear customer service/support. They will tell you to use the charts that are on their website.


Now it's up to you to decide who to listen to.


Just saying.
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Old 10-23-2020, 09:42 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by jjcooler65 View Post
So after having a blowout on a six month old China bomb on my brand new trailer I decided to upgrade to the Goodyear endurance. My original tires had a maximum air pressure rating of 65 psi which agrees with the data plate on the trailer itself. The new tires have a maximum air pressure of 90. So my question is obviously do I keep those at 90 or do I run with the 65 psi as the trailer tag states.? My thinking is if I put 65 in tires that are rated at 90 that they would be running soft and will heat up more.

Your profile says 2017 Rockwood. What trailer do you have now? What I'm worried about is your wheel psi rating. 65psi on the old tires. You are talking maybe 90 on the new ones. What are your wheels rated for? Probably 80 but who knows. Sure be a shame to load your trailer and take off on that long awaited getaway and lose an entire wheel assembly because of a wheel failure. Check out your wheel rating and then with a load weight on each wheel, check the inflation charts and run with confidence.

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Old 10-24-2020, 10:00 AM   #13
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Your profile says 2017 Rockwood. What trailer do you have now? What I'm worried about is your wheel psi rating. 65psi on the old tires. You are talking maybe 90 on the new ones. What are your wheels rated for? Probably 80 but who knows. Sure be a shame to load your trailer and take off on that long awaited getaway and lose an entire wheel assembly because of a wheel failure. Check out your wheel rating and then with a load weight on each wheel, check the inflation charts and run with confidence.

The wheel (rim) itself will handle the pressure of any tire that will fit on it. It is the valve stem that is limiting.
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Old 10-24-2020, 10:06 AM   #14
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The wheel (rim) itself will handle the pressure of any tire that will fit on it. It is the valve stem that is limiting.

OK, then why do the manufactures stamp psi rating on the rim? Maybe because the metal at the stem hole is weakening the overall rim? I really don't know, would love to see their reasoning. Maybe WMTIRE could enlighten us?
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Old 10-24-2020, 10:31 AM   #15
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OK, then why do the manufactures stamp psi rating on the rim? Maybe because the metal at the stem hole is weakening the overall rim? I really don't know, would love to see their reasoning. Maybe WMTIRE could enlighten us?
I was going on this info:
https://www.etrailer.com/question-313098.html

https://www.etrailer.com/question-230756.html

It's entirely possible their info is incorrect.
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Old 10-24-2020, 10:39 AM   #16
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OK, then why do the manufactures stamp psi rating on the rim? Maybe because the metal at the stem hole is weakening the overall rim? I really don't know, would love to see their reasoning. Maybe WMTIRE could enlighten us?
The wheel manufacturers have the option to provide both load and PSI requirements or load requirements that will accept any PSI necessary for that wheel to provide its maximum load capacity.

The USTMA supports both methods by saying a wheel marked with a PSI value is limited to that value.

Valve stems are an independent item. Like tires and wheels, they have their limits. They can be the wheel's weakest link. Of most importance; the valve stem MUST have an inflation pressure rating that is compatible with the wheel tire assembly maximum loads.

The USTMA strongly recommends the use of steel valve stems for all RV trailer wheel assemblies.
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Old 10-24-2020, 10:51 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
I was going on this info:
https://www.etrailer.com/question-313098.html

https://www.etrailer.com/question-230756.html

It's entirely possible their info is incorrect.
CDR, there are a lot of errors in those two links. Enough to invalidate them all together. Some are antiquated and other's are just wrong, in accordance with tire industry standards, which surely supersedes anything eTrailer says that disagrees with USTMA..
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Old 10-24-2020, 11:20 AM   #18
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The wheel manufacturers have the option to provide both load and PSI requirements or load requirements that will accept any PSI necessary for that wheel to provide its maximum load capacity.

The USTMA supports both methods by saying a wheel marked with a PSI value is limited to that value.

Valve stems are an independent item. Like tires and wheels, they have their limits. They can be the wheel's weakest link. Of most importance; the valve stem MUST have an inflation pressure rating that is compatible with the wheel tire assembly maximum loads.

The USTMA strongly recommends the use of steel valve stems for all RV trailer wheel assemblies.
I went through the Circle Jerk with my New under warranty Truck tire in regards to "Valve Stems"! I had a very slow leak that would set off the TPMS,so since the tires were Michelin I went to a Michelin tire dealer! They sprayed liquid on the tire and rim and said "Not our problem its the VALVE Stem GM used"! So I drove to Chevy Dealership and they Promptly replaced the Valve Stem! We were on a Long RV trip towing the TT! Youroo!!
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Old 10-24-2020, 11:22 AM   #19
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CDR, there are a lot of errors in those two links. Enough to invalidate them all together. Some are antiquated and other's are just wrong, in accordance with tire industry standards, which surely supersedes anything eTrailer says that disagrees with USTMA..
But I thought because it was on the internet, it had to be true!
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Old 10-24-2020, 11:37 AM   #20
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But I thought because it was on the internet, it had to be true!
Was there a picture of Lincoln next to the information? That is the gold standard in Internet “truth”. (Actually it is the zinc-copper standard since 1982.)
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