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Old 07-09-2021, 01:17 PM   #1
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Shocks on your trailer

So did putting shocks on your trailer help much, I was talking to the guy at my shop I go to for front end alignments and he said trailers don't need shocks as it don't help, he also said he wouldn't put air bags on my truck. I would rather get the opinion of someone with first hand experience with shocks on their trailer.
So has anyone put shocks on your trailer, let me know your thoughts.

Thank you
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Old 07-09-2021, 08:23 PM   #2
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Yes I do. They take some of the bounce out and also no more chop on the tires. Think about it, take the shocks off of your truck and then see how it rides?
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Old 07-09-2021, 09:06 PM   #3
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Trailers don't typically have shocks as there usually just isn't enough room and the suspension travel is minimal, so a shock isn't going to make that much difference.
I would buy something like a tandem axle equaflex system before I thought about shocks.
As for saving the tires, I believe that is mostly marketing hype. Trailers tires rarely wear out before they age out.
But if adding shocks makes you feel better, then it might be worth it to you.
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Old 07-10-2021, 11:54 AM   #4
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After I installed equalflex which improved the ride, cupboard doors quit popping open, my camper would still bounce up and down on rough highways. This could be because my 50 gallon fresh water tank is located at the very rear of the camper. Since adding this kit to the rear axle has solved my issues.
https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Lea.../LC281281.html
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Old 07-12-2021, 03:09 PM   #5
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I had shocks added to my bunkhouse fifth wheel and I literally couldn't tell a difference before and after.

My toy hauler came with the Lippert shocks on all 3 axles. No idea what it's like without them.
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Old 07-12-2021, 08:51 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graywolfdan View Post
Yes I do. They take some of the bounce out and also no more chop on the tires. Think about it, take the shocks off of your truck and then see how it rides?
X2

On our previous TT without shocks, the toaster was a "self cleaning" toaster! Everytime we got to a destination, cabinet doors had opened and let stuff escape, the microwave plate escaped once, the toaster cabinet was full of crumbs but, the toaster was empty. Now, with shocks on the 5'er, I have to clean the toaster, & no more cabinet doors opening up.

BTW - Balanced tires would be another thing to smooth the campers ride & save tire wear.
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Old 03-01-2022, 03:30 AM   #7
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Depends

You kind of asked an open ended question. There is a lot of opinions out there on this subject, all based on their personal setup. I'll try to put my experience of towing trailers for over 50 years. Right up front, I have only towed and travel trailer for about 8 years. Before that I would pull some type of trailer on average of 20,000 miles a year. None of them had shocks. Trailers I towed ranged from small car haulers to medium size equipment trailers. My new trailer is a toyhauler that is a bumper pull at about 35 foot with hitch, pulled by a Ford 250superduty, diesel. My very first trip hauling our TT I found it to be a total different animal. I read and listened to advise from many. Some advise was good and some not so. I did a few things to tame the animal with limited success. I put on airbags and then top end equalizer hitch, which allowed me to drive faster than 50mph with maintaining some sort of control. Out on the highway 65mph was okay as long as the wind was minimal. I also tried 14 ply tires after an original failed. Still tense at times. I did some research and decided to try the shock route. We live on a gravel road and I say a major difference in the first 100 ft. I have now put close to 4,000 miles on it. One trip was through the winds in eastern Montana. Doing 70mph in gusting winds, it was totally amazing. If not for the random blowing flag and the blowing grass to show the wind, I would have thought there was very little if any. There are many things that you need to consider. Most trailers that don't need shocks generally have a low center of gravity and or on the light side for the suspension that it's riding on. My trailer is pushing the limit of the suspension. To top it off, it is top heavy, especially compared to a car hauler. Most RV's are top heavy when you think about it. It starts with air conditioner on top. Most of them are build for a 7 foot or taller person. Cupboards that holds most of your dishes, food, etc. The frig is usually setting a ways off the floor, and the list goes on. Really the only things low mounted are the tanks. Infact most RV's floor's are higher than the top of the tires. So any suspension control helps in sway control. If your trailer is on the light side, maybe you don't need shocks. But when towing your trailer and you see it swaying or when you hit a dip or hole in the road and the front of your truck is rocking up and down, You might consider shocks. If you can roll down the road at a moderate speed, with one hand on the wheel while talking to your passenger (and your passenger doesn't have a scared look on their face and they're talking with you) you may be wasting your money to add shocks. With a couple ATV's in my trailer, it is pushing 13,500 pounds with 1,500-1,800 pounds on the hitch and the shocks made a huge difference on mine. I have put heavier axles on, but they weren't the control issue. I bent three because they were to light for the weight of the trailer. The tag on the side says I can put 3,500 pounds in the trailer, but dry weight is over 12,000 pounds.(That is based on scale weight and not the manufacture's inaccurate weight of just over 9,000 pounds)
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Old 03-01-2022, 06:32 PM   #8
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My test was the cords hanging down from my ceiling fan and the drawer under the oven. When we traveled, the cords would always be stuck in the fan light fixture and the drawer under the oven would be open. I added Road Armor equalizers and that did not help. Added shocks and now the cords are still hanging and the drawer is still closed. So this extremely scientific test proves that shocks help.
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Old 03-01-2022, 11:39 PM   #9
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Whether or not shocks will help on a trailer will depend almost totally on the angle they are installed at. If there isn't much distance between axle and frame most shocks will often be installed at steep angles just to be able to fit the shock in.
The greater the angle the less the effect.

Shocks are most effective when installed as close as possible to vertical.

I will say that the Dexter Torflex axles on my trailer do a great job of damping bumps. Nothing gets rearranged during a long drive unless the highway is in terrible shape.
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Old 03-02-2022, 09:10 AM   #10
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After 30+ years of towing RVs and a dozen trailers I have never seen the need for shocks. Air bags don't make up for too little truck. If you need air bags you probably need a bigger truck instead.
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Old 03-03-2022, 10:25 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corn18 View Post
My test was the cords hanging down from my ceiling fan and the drawer under the oven. When we traveled, the cords would always be stuck in the fan light fixture and the drawer under the oven would be open. I added Road Armor equalizers and that did not help. Added shocks and now the cords are still hanging and the drawer is still closed. So this extremely scientific test proves that shocks help.

I too installed both Road Armor equalizers and Road Master Comfort Ride shocks on my fiver. BIG improvement while towing the RV. Adding both reduced the amount of vibration and shock transferred to the body of the RV and reduced the wear and tear on everything inside and outside of it. Unfortunately, with the worsening build quality of the newer RV's, I've decided to take whatever steps I can to keep mine from falling apart.
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