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Old 04-05-2019, 10:47 AM   #1
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Sorry, ANOTHER tire thread

First off, anyone know what tire size I need to get? My camper is on it's winter site and I am heading up in two weeks to move it, want to have tires so I can get them put on when I get there. I am thinking about Maxxis M008 but any other suggestions and or current deals would be appreciated too!
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:03 AM   #2
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I did a Google search and all I could come up with was 16-inch wheels.

Don't think Maxxis 8008's come in 16-inch...

Best bet would be to call Forest River with your Vin# and ask them what was on it when it left the factory.

Or better yet...you might want to wait and just look at them yourself before purchasing new tires.

You never know what the dealer might have done to it while it was sitting on their lot.
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:05 AM   #3
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They come in 16"

https://www.maxxis.com/catalog/tire-...t-radial-m8008

235/80R16
But only in 10 ply.
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Old 04-05-2019, 03:50 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeysotp View Post
First off, anyone know what tire size I need to get? My camper is on it's winter site and I am heading up in two weeks to move it, want to have tires so I can get them put on when I get there. I am thinking about Maxxis M008 but any other suggestions and or current deals would be appreciated too!
According to the specs for your trailer the tires should be ST235/80R16 LRE. So you don't want anything less than that.

IMO, it's best to get RV trailer tires that are readily available in your traveling areas. I'd also get some with a speed rating of 75 MPH or higher. Maxxis has not added a speed letter to any of their ST tires so they are still 65 MPH tires.
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Old 04-06-2019, 12:54 PM   #5
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If you have 16" wheels just get Sailun and forget about tire problems!
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Old 04-06-2019, 01:07 PM   #6
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Been very happy with my Goodyear Endurance tires, so I wouldn’t overlook them as an option provided they’re available in your size.
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Old 04-06-2019, 01:34 PM   #7
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235/80R16 Tire Compare

My 2016 Wildcat came with the Maxxis 8008 and when I replaced them I stayed with the Maxxis 8008. Considered the Sailun but had 2 concerns.

1) Sailun is a 110psi tire and my 6 lug wheels are only rated for 80psi.
2) Read a couple of instances where the much heavier (see attached chart) weight of the Sailun's had caused cracked wheels.

Conclusions: PSI turned out to not be an issue. I called Sailun and they confirmed you can run their 110 psi tires at 80psi no problem. But I still had concerns over the heavier weight on the aluminum wheels and since the Maxxis had done so well for me so I stayed with Maxxis.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Compare Five ST and LT Tire Specs.pdf (584.2 KB, 37 views)
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Old 04-08-2019, 10:44 AM   #8
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Great Chart!

Thanks HBillSmith for the chart comparing tires. Very useful. We upgraded from the factory tires after our first year and went from C rated to D rated Maxis 8008. Also added TPS system and we now have the peace of mind that our trailer is safe to tow. I can vouch for the Maxis tires - very good product.
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:19 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by CaptnJohn View Post
If you have 16" wheels just get Sailun and forget about tire problems!
X2
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:28 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by hbillsmith View Post
My 2016 Wildcat came with the Maxxis 8008 and when I replaced them I stayed with the Maxxis 8008. Considered the Sailun but had 2 concerns.

1) Sailun is a 110psi tire and my 6 lug wheels are only rated for 80psi.
2) Read a couple of instances where the much heavier (see attached chart) weight of the Sailun's had caused cracked wheels.

Conclusions: PSI turned out to not be an issue. I called Sailun and they confirmed you can run their 110 psi tires at 80psi no problem. But I still had concerns over the heavier weight on the aluminum wheels and since the Maxxis had done so well for me so I stayed with Maxxis.
I am curious about how it was determined the the WEIGHT of a tire caused wheels to crack. Not a tire engineer, but it seems to me that the weight of a tire carcass would be minimal compared to other forces on wheels, especially on a tandem, but single axle as well. As I think about it, the tire weight is supported by the road and the tire supports the wheel weight. This is as good as any time learn if I am just an ignoramus about an unexpected force on my wheels imposed by the weight of the tires. Do you have any handy information about this supposed finding?
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:36 PM   #11
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Sorry, ANOTHER tire thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slow Moon View Post
I am curious about how it was determined the the WEIGHT of a tire caused wheels to crack. Not a tire engineer, but it seems to me that the weight of a tire carcass would be minimal compared to other forces on wheels, especially on a tandem, but single axle as well. As I think about it, the tire weight is supported by the road and the tire supports the wheel weight. This is as good as any time learn if I am just an ignoramus about an unexpected force on my wheels imposed by the weight of the tires. Do you have any handy information about this supposed finding?


It’s just not possible that a heavier tire caused wheel problems. More than likely the cracks were because of running 110psi on wheels rated for much less. I’ve said it multiple times, make sure your wheels are rated for the higher pressure if you upgrade tires and are thinking about running higher pressure than on the placard. No doubt people just blindly follow the “run sidewall psi” “advice” given by many here without considering what the wheels are capable of.
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Old 04-12-2019, 08:07 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by DieselDrax View Post
It’s just not possible that a heavier tire caused wheel problems. More than likely the cracks were because of running 110psi on wheels rated for much less. I’ve said it multiple times, make sure your wheels are rated for the higher pressure if you upgrade tires and are thinking about running higher pressure than on the placard. No doubt people just blindly follow the “run sidewall psi” “advice” given by many here without considering what the wheels are capable of.
To add to this...

It has also been floated around here in past discussions that the valve stems are what needs to be rated for 80 or 110 PSI and not the wheels

This, I believe, is not true.
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Old 04-12-2019, 08:14 PM   #13
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To add to this...

It has also been floated around here in past discussions that the valve stems are what needs to be rated for 80 or 110 PSI and not the wheels

This, I believe, is not true.
I think that's right the BOTH wheels and valve stems need to be rated for the pressures used.

If you figured the square inches of rim loaded by the pressure and multiplied by 110 or 80, that's a lot of load.
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Old 04-13-2019, 06:27 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slow Moon View Post
I am curious about how it was determined the the WEIGHT of a tire caused wheels to crack. Not a tire engineer, but it seems to me that the weight of a tire carcass would be minimal compared to other forces on wheels, especially on a tandem, but single axle as well. As I think about it, the tire weight is supported by the road and the tire supports the wheel weight. This is as good as any time learn if I am just an ignoramus about an unexpected force on my wheels imposed by the weight of the tires. Do you have any handy information about this supposed finding?
As I recall, there were 2 reported instances. Hispec replaced the wheels in both occurrences. The assumption that the heavier tire weight caused the cracks is simply my own observational speculation.
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Old 04-13-2019, 06:33 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by CaptnJohn View Post
If you have 16" wheels just get Sailun and forget about tire problems!
Agreed! Support international trade too! Great tires, no smoke mirrors like Good Year did with me and the China Bomb Marathon's.
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