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Old 06-30-2022, 06:08 AM   #1
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Tire pressure

Just checking to see what people run for tire pressure I have a Georgetown 34 ft motorhome if you run recommend on tire or something different ? Thanks.
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Old 06-30-2022, 12:14 PM   #2
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The pressure on tire is only what is needed for the maximum load given on tire, upto the speed for wich maxload is detetmined for the tire. And that is not the weight on axle or axle-end.

The recomendation of motorhome maker, is mostly determined by the maker of the base car, yust enaugh for GAWR's, but sometimes by motorhome maker, and then I would not have mutch convidence in it, they are no tire- specialist.

Motorhomes are mostly used to the max weights, and almost always R/ L unbalance, so calculating for GAWR is not enaugh ( what basecarmaker does).


Advantage of motorhome use, is that once determined the right weights for the pressure, it stays practically the same in the years.

So weighing fully loaded per axle, better per axle-end, and then calculate pressure for that with max reserve, with still acceptable comfort and gripp, is the best way, and will be the answer many will give you.
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Old 06-30-2022, 01:05 PM   #3
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Tire Pressure

Whatever number, maximum pressure, is on the sidewall of the tire when it is at the ambient or cold temperature.

I don't weigh our trailer and just use the maximum load and thus maximum pressure numbers.

Some people may load their trailer light and can get by with lower pressures. But do they actually know the weight and thus the correct pressure for the exact weight? I doubt it.

Therefore, by using the maximum rated pressure one is always safe up to the maximum rated load.
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Old 06-30-2022, 01:26 PM   #4
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There are literally hundreds of posts on the forum regarding tire pressure. If you do not wish to search for details of the answer. Then, just go with the tire pressure max number on the side of the tire, remember this is a cold number. So set the pressure early and before you drive.
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Old 06-30-2022, 01:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob K4TAX View Post
Whatever number, maximum pressure, is on the sidewall of the tire when it is at the ambient or cold temperature.



I don't weigh our trailer and just use the maximum load and thus maximum pressure numbers.



Some people may load their trailer light and can get by with lower pressures. But do they actually know the weight and thus the correct pressure for the exact weight? I doubt it.



Therefore, by using the maximum rated pressure one is always safe up to the maximum rated load.
What you suggest works fine with the same size and load rating tire that was orginally installed by manufacturer. If tire size/load range has been changed it would be wise to weigh vehicle, consult tire manufacturer's load/inflation chart, and select the more proper inflation pressure.

Then again, if you want to subject your vehicle to a really rough ride and potentially poor traction on wet/slippery roads, then by all means blow the tires up to the max

BTW, OP has a motorhome.
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Old 06-30-2022, 01:55 PM   #6
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Tire Pressure

Tire manufacturers put the numbers on the side of a tire after many hours and sessions of tests.

The traction rating of the tire is based on a given value of tire pressure.

As to ride, there is no quotient to equate the value.

I doubt that many actually weigh their RV every time they load it or use it. And I'd expect the weight to change from trip to trip. And even during the trip. Water on board, holding tank contents, etc. That means, per your suggestion, one should change tire pressure for every trip.

It is a known fact that underinflated tires are a formula for failure. Why take a chance on a tire failure and have it rip out the wheel well and damage the side of the trailer.

Personally, I'd rather be safe by using the recommended tire pressure for the maximum rated load range of the tires. I did change our tires from load range C to load range D. Why? Because load range C tires were less than the rated gross weight of the trailer. They were correct about the trailer's empty weight, but who drags around an empty trailer?

Yes, the factory-supplied tires were not rated correctly. For both load range C and load range D, the inflation pressure is the same.
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Old 06-30-2022, 03:41 PM   #7
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I have put my remarks i. Your quote underlined.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob K4TAX View Post
Tire manufacturers put the numbers on the side of a tire after many hours and sessions of tests. not true, they yust calculate it with use of sises, needed speed, and referencepressure

The traction rating of the tire is based on a given value of tire pressure.

As to ride, there is no quotient to equate the value.

I doubt that many actually weigh their RV every time they load it or use it. And I'd expect the weight to change from trip to trip. And even during the trip. Water on board, holding tank contents, etc. That means, per your suggestion, one should change tire pressure for every trip.
luckyly the weights and weightdivision stays pretty the same during the years, so once weighed fully loaded, can do for years if you take a comfortable reserve

It is a known fact that underinflated tires are a formula for failure. Why take a chance on a tire failure and have it rip out the wheel well and damage the side of the trailer.
this post is for motorhome, and much to high pressure, especially on front, makes your luxuary motorhome, drive like an old army truck, and kidneybelt needed

Personally, I'd rather be safe by using the recommended tire pressure for the maximum rated load range of the tires. I did change our tires from load range C to load range D. Why? Because load range C tires were less than the rated gross weight of the trailer. They were correct about the trailer's empty weight, but who drags around an empty trailer?

Yes, the factory-supplied tires were not rated correctly. For both load range C and load range D, the inflation pressure is the same.
if you have a higher loadrange/plyrating of same sise tire, you need a bit higher pressure for same load, but most American lists give all the loadranges in one list. Europa makes for every plyrating a seperate list, in wich for the higher plyrating( =loadrange) lower loadcapacity for same pressure.
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Old 07-03-2022, 10:14 PM   #8
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Personally, I just set the tire pressure according to the tire manufacturer's recommendation according to the RV's GVWR and/ or GAWRs + 10%. If the rear axle weight limit is 9000 lbs, then it is 4500 lbs + 450 that I would base the inflation pressure on.
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Old 07-16-2022, 05:59 PM   #9
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Always go by the max cold pressure stated on the tire. They made the tire, they know best. It keeps sidewall cooler and prevents blowouts from under inflation.
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Old 07-16-2022, 06:15 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by krazyk View Post
Always go by the max cold pressure stated on the tire. They made the tire, they know best. It keeps sidewall cooler and prevents blowouts from under inflation.
Then why do those exact same tire manufacturers also publish inflation vs. load charts?
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