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Old 08-13-2022, 07:04 PM   #1
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Tire PSI

If changing tire load rating from a D-65psi to a E rating; is it recommended to increase the tire psi or keep the same 65 psi?
Thank You
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Old 08-13-2022, 07:20 PM   #2
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I'll say its really up to you.
All E rated tires will officially have the same load rating as a D rated tire (of the same size) if you only inflate it to 65psi. So at a minimum you would need to set the PSI to what ever your trailer recommended for the D rated tire (probably cold max @65psi)
To gain extra capacity/overhead you would need to go over the 65psi of the D. I run my E's at close to 80 just because.

Jim M.
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Old 08-13-2022, 07:24 PM   #3
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The 65 psi on your OEM load range D tires is set to provide 2040lbs of support per axle. If you upgrade, you will need to set the psi at the pressure your new tire manufacturer recommends to maintain that 2040lbs per axle.

Also, the other thing you have to consider is your trailer rims have a max psi rating (usually stamped somewhere on the rim itself). In addition, the valve stem has a max psi rating (if it's rubber- 65psi max. If it's metal- 80 psi).

My OEM tires are 65 PSI. I plan on upgrading to Goodyear endurance tires which are rated at 80 psi. I intend to run the new tires at 65 PSI in accordance with Goodyear endurance is load range chart to give me that minimum 2040lbs per axle. However, I would have no problem running the new tires at 80 psi provided I have metal stems and I can verify that my rims can handle the increased pressure.

Hope this helped,
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Old 08-13-2022, 07:35 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by BD Nomad View Post
The 65 psi on your OEM load range D tires is set to provide 2040lbs of support per axle. If you upgrade, you will need to set the psi at the pressure your new tire manufacturer recommends to maintain that 2040lbs per axle.

Also, the other thing you have to consider is your trailer rims have a max psi rating (usually stamped somewhere on the rim itself). In addition, the valve stem has a max psi rating (if it's rubber- 65psi max. If it's metal- 80 psi).

My OEM tires are 65 PSI. I plan on upgrading to Goodyear endurance tires which are rated at 80 psi. I intend to run the new tires at 65 PSI in accordance with Goodyear endurance is load range chart to give me that minimum 2040lbs per axle. However, I would have no problem running the new tires at 80 psi provided I have metal stems and I can verify that my rims can handle the increased pressure.

Hope this helped,
NomadBD


Not all rubber valve stems are rated at 65 psi! I recently upgraded from load D to load E tires. I wanted metal valve stem but could get them in a timely matter.. the tire shop had high pressure rubber valve stem rated for 100 psi that I went with.. and btw I run my tires at 70psi just to have a better piece of mind as the previous tires were border line, and trailer pulls so much better and doesn’t bounce going down the road…. My .02
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Old 08-13-2022, 09:22 PM   #5
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Apparently wasn't clear in my previous comments. What I meant was that if your OEM trailer tires are rated for 65 PSI, and you have rubber valve stems, those stems are rated for 65 PSI.
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Old 08-13-2022, 09:58 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BD Nomad View Post
The 65 psi on your OEM load range D tires is set to provide 2040lbs of support per axle. If you upgrade, you will need to set the psi at the pressure your new tire manufacturer recommends to maintain that 2040lbs per axle.

Also, the other thing you have to consider is your trailer rims have a max psi rating (usually stamped somewhere on the rim itself). In addition, the valve stem has a max psi rating (if it's rubber- 65psi max. If it's metal- 80 psi).

My OEM tires are 65 PSI. I plan on upgrading to Goodyear endurance tires which are rated at 80 psi. I intend to run the new tires at 65 PSI in accordance with Goodyear endurance is load range chart to give me that minimum 2040lbs per axle. However, I would have no problem running the new tires at 80 psi provided I have metal stems and I can verify that my rims can handle the increased pressure.

Hope this helped,
NomadBD
I'm no expert but at these pressures I'm not sure how critical this is. I upgrading my tires from D to E. I never found any info on the rims to tell me their limit. I'm not sure if the tire shop replaced the stems at all. If they did they are rubber. They didn't ask if I wanted "high pressure" though with E rated tires maybe they used good ones. But anyway my tires have been holding 80psi all season with no issues.

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Old 08-13-2022, 10:20 PM   #7
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The 65 psi on your OEM load range D tires is set to provide 2040lbs of support per axle.
I would have to disagree. The tires are rated for 2040 lbs each and there are two tires per axle. I would say that axle weight rating is 3500 - 4000 lbs.
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Old 08-14-2022, 04:12 AM   #8
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If you are talking about trailer tires, the cold psi rating is on the sidewall. If you are smart and care about heat prematurely wearing your tires, air them up to that amount after they have sat static and are shaded and not sitting in sunlight (cold). Lower pressure will cause more heat in the tires. What is the point of running less than the sidewall ?
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Old 08-14-2022, 04:12 AM   #9
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Thank You for all of your input
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Old 08-16-2022, 08:54 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by mfMcFroggierPod View Post
If changing tire load rating from a D-65psi to a E rating; is it recommended to increase the tire psi or keep the same 65 psi?
Thank You

Both of those load ranges provide the same load capacity at 65 PSI. The LRE allows you optional inflation pressures from 65 PSI to 80 PSI.

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf
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