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Old 03-01-2021, 03:59 PM   #21
Amy S.
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 13
Do you have any information about the salvage option? I've spoken to another dealer who wants to help my out by taking my settlement toward a new camper, so I'll start all over with payments. Then they get my 5th wheel as well to tear into on their time & then resell it. It seems someone would be willing to purchase my camper to refurbish it rather than me giving it to the dealership. I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around this. Is this what you mean by salvage it (salvaging what I can)? Thanks ~ Amy :-)
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Old 03-01-2021, 04:39 PM   #22
Amy S.
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 13
Dana & Terri,
Thank you so much for the words of encouragement. I, too, have wondered if I decide to make it a DIY repair, would having the pros fix the roof make the most sense? My concern with that is that when they remove the roof membrane (assuming a patch job is not the plan), & if they uncovered mold, that would be the time to remove any damaged insulation, treat and remove mold that may be present under the roof. But insurance won't cover that, so if they remove the roof, they'd just cover the mold problem up. The thought of removing the roof is overwhelming, but I have a pretty good network of skilled blue-collar workers (though we're all getting old!) that I could most likely hire at wayyyy less than the dealer's $150/hr. I appreciate your kind words, your understanding, & your opinion. The clock is ticking on my opportunity to make a decision since the insurance company doesn't want to pay the $45/day storage fee. Thanks for helping me. Happy Trails! Amy :-)
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Old 03-01-2021, 04:46 PM   #23
Amy S.
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 13
Thank you for your insights. I'm curious if the repair center took your camper toward a trade-in? The place I went today would be taking my ins $ as the downpayment and my camper as well. The ins company would arrange the exploratory mold services but I'd have to pay for it. Not sure what to do. If I DIY, Idk if the mold testing kits out there on Amazon are even effective. Ugh. Thanks again! Amy :-)
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Old 03-01-2021, 05:02 PM   #24
Amy S.
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 13
Thanks for the info about the ozone generator. Def on my purchase list to "just have."
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Old 03-01-2021, 05:25 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schaeferamy View Post
Do you have any information about the salvage option?
Amy, I'm also confused as to what they mean by 'salvage value'.

If your insurance company is going to send the check to you for partial damage, you don't have to do anything but get that rv home until you can get some of your friends to take a look at it. You've got a place to keep it and a dehumidifier will help keep mold from forming and keep it under control if it's already in there.

It seems like everyone is rushing you to make a decision and that's not a good time to buy or sell.
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Old 03-04-2021, 07:32 PM   #26
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Sorry about your loss and your RV difficulties. First, I wonder if your insurance company is doing all they should for you. They will pay for repair of the water leak but not pay for damage caused by the water leak? That sounds odd. It might be worth you consulting an attorney to see if they are really doing all they are required to do. Secondly, bleach works wonders at killing mold, but be cautious with the fumes, they could kill you too if you breath too much of it. Whatever you decide, good luck.
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Old 03-04-2021, 07:58 PM   #27
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This past year my wife and I discovered mold in the roof of our cabover motorhome.
The cab over portion was really totally destroyed - with no evidence inside but a slight odor. We ripped off the roof and cabover/bed - rebuilt the entire cabover bed - removed the damaged roof insulation and rebuilt and replaced the roof. It took about 3 months - with several weeks of downtime due to waiting on parts.My estimates at the local shops were 8-10K - it cost us around 4K in parts. It was a two person job for a lot of the rebuild. we were able to purchase parts online and most were readily available. It was a lot of work but for someone with diy capability and no fear of heights - entirely doable. Luckily the mold did not get into the walls but that is repairable as well. Even if the walls had problems - I would have pulled off and rebuilt. My interior was like brand new and the motorhome was still worth about 35K - so it seemed worth it to me.
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Old 03-04-2021, 07:58 PM   #28
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I am wondering if it would be worthwhile to check with a company like ServePro that has experience with water and mold remediation in homes?
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Old 03-05-2021, 01:13 AM   #29
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Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Abilene, TX
Posts: 35
I have some experience in mold mitigation. This RV can be saved.

First, do not go inside any mold infested structure without a NIOSH P100 respirator. It won't kill you immediately, but it can cause short-term and long-term health issues.

Ozone treatments do work, however I do not normally recommend them anymore. Technically, it's not the ozone itself that kills the mold, but the reaction of ozone (O3) with airborne water moisture (H2O) to create an aerosolized hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) -- which then kills the mold. However, not all the ozone bonds with the water moisture and even small amounts of inhaled free ozone can damage the lungs, cause chest pain, shortness of breath or throat irritation. Ozone will also break down rubber, fabrics, plastics and other synthetic furnishings over time. Ozone will also react with existing chemicals in the air to create other toxic gases such as formaldehyde (CH2O) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) which are extremely toxic.

UV light is highly effective at killing mold, but it's hard to get the light inside walls and all the nooks and crannies where mold hangs out. Germicidal UV lamps are rated for occupied spaces or for unoccupied spaces. The unoccupied space lamps will cause painful eye irritations and a reddening (or burning) of the skin almost immediately. The occupied space lamps are better, but still need special precautions. And... UV lamps will generate ozone during prolonged use (see above). If you go the UV route, use UV protecting goggles and cover all exposed skin.

Hydrogen peroxide as a topical solution is absolutely amazing at killing mold. Mix a 3% concentration hydrogen peroxide into a glass spray bottle. Spray until saturated. Let sit for 10 15 minutes. Wipe away and rinse the area with water and dry with a hair dryer or fan. Be sure to wear your respirator when doing this task as you will dislodge lots of dead and dying mold spores. Also note that hydrogen peroxide can bleach some fabrics, so test a small area first.

The best solution, bar none, is a new device called a CIMR which generates a pure hydrogen peroxide gas. It takes a day or two to get to all the existing mold, but once cleared, it will stay clear. The CIMR produced H2O2 gas self-regulates at low levels (.02ppm) which is well under OSHA limits so you can use it in continuously occupied spaces if desired. Because the CIMR can be used continuously in occupied spaces, it keeps any lingering mold from reproducing and recontaminating the space. FEMA now recommends it and has approved it for reimbursement. In most cases, little to no tear out is needed as long as you can find a way to get the CIMR infused air to circulate inside the walls, cabinets, etc.

The devices are a bit expensive at ~$1000 or so, but really do the job like nothing else. Search for CIMRtech.

My recommendation. Mask up and spray down any mold you see with a hydrogen peroxide solution. Then close all the windows and doors and run the CIMR for several days with as many fans on as you can pointing at the hard to reach areas. Then keep the CIMR going and go about life as normal for the next month (or years). You will be amazed the results.
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Old 03-05-2021, 08:38 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pred View Post
Good advice from Oaklevel on getting a 2nd opinion and phillg on finding someone who has the proper testing equipment. If the mold is limited to the area directly below the entry point on the roof and you can get access to treat the area, look at a product called Concrobium which is available at Home Depot and other stores.
It is specifically made for mold remediation. I encountered mold during a bathroom/shower remodel and this is what I used which was very effective.
Some Home Depot Rental departments have a fogger made specifically for the Concrobium product if you want to atomize and distribute in a RV or room.
I'm not an expert on this; but, this is just another option to consider. Good luck and I too am very sorry for your loss. Let us know what you find and decide to do.
https://www.concrobium.com/
I have this setup and have used it on molded rental property prior to repair. It works 100 percent.
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Old 03-05-2021, 09:12 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bdunst View Post
This past year my wife and I discovered mold in the roof of our cabover motorhome.
The cab over portion was really totally destroyed - with no evidence inside but a slight odor. We ripped off the roof and cabover/bed - rebuilt the entire cabover bed - removed the damaged roof insulation and rebuilt and replaced the roof. It took about 3 months - with several weeks of downtime due to waiting on parts.My estimates at the local shops were 8-10K - it cost us around 4K in parts. It was a two person job for a lot of the rebuild. we were able to purchase parts online and most were readily available. It was a lot of work but for someone with diy capability and no fear of heights - entirely doable. Luckily the mold did not get into the walls but that is repairable as well. Even if the walls had problems - I would have pulled off and rebuilt. My interior was like brand new and the motorhome was still worth about 35K - so it seemed worth it to me.
Just curious what the source of the mold was and how did you fix it to prevent it from happening again. Thanks
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Old 03-05-2021, 10:19 AM   #32
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Posts: 64
No one is judging you Amy. We empathize with your unimaginable losses. I wish I could help you in more ways than one.
Any chance you're near Indiana? If so, I know a guy that is over the top knowledgeable, clever, experienced, and thinks outside the box. He mainly works on Forest River rigs and used to work for them
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Old 03-05-2021, 01:39 PM   #33
Amy S.
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tacky View Post
Sorry about your loss and your RV difficulties. First, I wonder if your insurance company is doing all they should for you. They will pay for repair of the water leak but not pay for damage caused by the water leak? That sounds odd. It might be worth you consulting an attorney to see if they are really doing all they are required to do. Secondly, bleach works wonders at killing mold, but be cautious with the fumes, they could kill you too if you breath too much of it. Whatever you decide, good luck.
When my adjuster contacted me a couple days ago, I asked how mold damage is separated out from water damage--specifically, what if the roof rafter(s) got wet & are in question. She replied, "The roof damage from tearing will be covered including damage to the underlayment due to water entering." Still waiting for RV dealership to call with the estimate.

It's hopeful to me that more is covered than what was initially implied. I'm still concerned that if mold is present in the roof that they may just cover it up. That's a discussion I can have with whomever I have do the repair-- I suppose I can always buck up more $$ beyond the insurance settlement.

Thanks~
Amy :-)
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Old 03-05-2021, 01:58 PM   #34
Amy S.
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdunst View Post
This past year my wife and I discovered mold in the roof of our cabover motorhome.
The cab over portion was really totally destroyed - with no evidence inside but a slight odor. We ripped off the roof and cabover/bed - rebuilt the entire cabover bed - removed the damaged roof insulation and rebuilt and replaced the roof. It took about 3 months - with several weeks of downtime due to waiting on parts.My estimates at the local shops were 8-10K - it cost us around 4K in parts. It was a two person job for a lot of the rebuild. we were able to purchase parts online and most were readily available. It was a lot of work but for someone with diy capability and no fear of heights - entirely doable. Luckily the mold did not get into the walls but that is repairable as well. Even if the walls had problems - I would have pulled off and rebuilt. My interior was like brand new and the motorhome was still worth about 35K - so it seemed worth it to me.
Impressive that u guys took that on--Congrats! Hubs & I did projects together for 40yrs--having bought our endearing little shack (home) when I was still a teenager (19!). His last project was a pergola; couldn't lift final cross-braces (2ft long 4x4s) due to ALS. It's a great place to find solace sitting beneath it.

How lucky that mold didn't get into your walls--something I'm hopeful of since no confirmation of mold in walls. I put a call into FR Mon but no one called me back yet. Brochure shows I have fiberglass shell w/ metal studs & foam insulation--none of which are yummy to mold. I want to know what the brochure describes as "laminated" walls for structure--is the interior paneling laminated to the foam? If so, & IF I do discover mold inside a wall, what will happen when we start to remove paneling? No paneling buckled or swelled; it's all subtle, almost indistinguishable, water marks. Also want to know what paneling is made of....perhaps vinyl?

If nothing in the walls are organic, I lean more toward less concern for mold infestation, esp since it's just this RV center's inference based on one moldy seat cushion that was beneath a window that appears to have leaked. When I went to have tarp put on roof, we discovered the seams in the gutter over the slide failed. You can see 2 water lines running down right into the slide corresponding with the mold on seat & on back of sofa. All the duct tape on the tears in roof was intact.

Thanks for sharing your success story! It gives me hope!
Amy :-)
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Old 03-05-2021, 02:09 PM   #35
Amy S.
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TN Bigfoot View Post
I am wondering if it would be worthwhile to check with a company like ServePro that has experience with water and mold remediation in homes?
Servepro is on my list of people to check with directly from my insurance adjuster. I think it will be worth having a pro check it out to ease my mind, yet I'm also getting advise to DIY mold tests using what's sold on Amazon. Decisions, decisions. I spoke w/ a "mold guy" who a trusted friend in the basement waterproofing business referred. He said he'd drill 3/8" holes into the 3 spots w/ water stains & use video probe to take a look.

Once I get confirmation about what the walls are made of, I'm going to decide whether to have him do that. If there's nothing organic in the walls, I'm pretty convinced this RV dealership is very short-sighted w/ their determination of "extensive mold" in the walls. Btw, this is not a FR dealership. I'm leaning toward having a FR dealer, who knows the product, to fix it if I don't DIY.
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Old 03-05-2021, 02:15 PM   #36
Amy S.
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltsman View Post
I have some experience in mold mitigation. This RV can be saved.

First, do not go inside any mold infested structure without a NIOSH P100 respirator. It won't kill you immediately, but it can cause short-term and long-term health issues.

Ozone treatments do work, however I do not normally recommend them anymore. Technically, it's not the ozone itself that kills the mold, but the reaction of ozone (O3) with airborne water moisture (H2O) to create an aerosolized hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) -- which then kills the mold. However, not all the ozone bonds with the water moisture and even small amounts of inhaled free ozone can damage the lungs, cause chest pain, shortness of breath or throat irritation. Ozone will also break down rubber, fabrics, plastics and other synthetic furnishings over time. Ozone will also react with existing chemicals in the air to create other toxic gases such as formaldehyde (CH2O) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) which are extremely toxic.

UV light is highly effective at killing mold, but it's hard to get the light inside walls and all the nooks and crannies where mold hangs out. Germicidal UV lamps are rated for occupied spaces or for unoccupied spaces. The unoccupied space lamps will cause painful eye irritations and a reddening (or burning) of the skin almost immediately. The occupied space lamps are better, but still need special precautions. And... UV lamps will generate ozone during prolonged use (see above). If you go the UV route, use UV protecting goggles and cover all exposed skin.

Hydrogen peroxide as a topical solution is absolutely amazing at killing mold. Mix a 3% concentration hydrogen peroxide into a glass spray bottle. Spray until saturated. Let sit for 10 15 minutes. Wipe away and rinse the area with water and dry with a hair dryer or fan. Be sure to wear your respirator when doing this task as you will dislodge lots of dead and dying mold spores. Also note that hydrogen peroxide can bleach some fabrics, so test a small area first.

The best solution, bar none, is a new device called a CIMR which generates a pure hydrogen peroxide gas. It takes a day or two to get to all the existing mold, but once cleared, it will stay clear. The CIMR produced H2O2 gas self-regulates at low levels (.02ppm) which is well under OSHA limits so you can use it in continuously occupied spaces if desired. Because the CIMR can be used continuously in occupied spaces, it keeps any lingering mold from reproducing and recontaminating the space. FEMA now recommends it and has approved it for reimbursement. In most cases, little to no tear out is needed as long as you can find a way to get the CIMR infused air to circulate inside the walls, cabinets, etc.

The devices are a bit expensive at ~$1000 or so, but really do the job like nothing else. Search for CIMRtech.

My recommendation. Mask up and spray down any mold you see with a hydrogen peroxide solution. Then close all the windows and doors and run the CIMR for several days with as many fans on as you can pointing at the hard to reach areas. Then keep the CIMR going and go about life as normal for the next month (or years). You will be amazed the results.
Thank you for the information. I appreciate all the details.
Happy trails~
Amy :-)
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Old 03-05-2021, 03:47 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schaeferamy View Post
Impressive that u guys took that on--Congrats! Hubs & I did projects together for 40yrs--having bought our endearing little shack (home) when I was still a teenager (19!). His last project was a pergola; couldn't lift final cross-braces (2ft long 4x4s) due to ALS. It's a great place to find solace sitting beneath it.

How lucky that mold didn't get into your walls--something I'm hopeful of since no confirmation of mold in walls. I put a call into FR Mon but no one called me back yet. Brochure shows I have fiberglass shell w/ metal studs & foam insulation--none of which are yummy to mold. I want to know what the brochure describes as "laminated" walls for structure--is the interior paneling laminated to the foam? If so, & IF I do discover mold inside a wall, what will happen when we start to remove paneling? No paneling buckled or swelled; it's all subtle, almost indistinguishable, water marks. Also want to know what paneling is made of....perhaps vinyl?

If nothing in the walls are organic, I lean more toward less concern for mold infestation, esp since it's just this RV center's inference based on one moldy seat cushion that was beneath a window that appears to have leaked. When I went to have tarp put on roof, we discovered the seams in the gutter over the slide failed. You can see 2 water lines running down right into the slide corresponding with the mold on seat & on back of sofa. All the duct tape on the tears in roof was intact.

Thanks for sharing your success story! It gives me hope!
Amy :-)
We had failed roof seams as well. Surprised me because i was pretty good at annual inspections and sealing.
But I believe it was a heavy slow melting snow that caused the issue.
The outside fiberglass panels are laminated to plywood structure, the roof is the same. Our interior is a very durable rv wallpaper that i could not source anywhere, that was laminated to i want to say 1/8 inch wood panels, special kind that are water resistant.
Look on youtube lots of people do these repairs.
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