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Old 09-04-2020, 12:54 PM   #1
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Lookin for opinions on trailer storage covers

I have read several appends regarding covering the trailer for the off season/winter. Lots of warnings about not using plastic tarps because they are not breathable, trap moisture, etc.


Since I started looking at all the choices, I'm seeing where the choices in materials and prices vary wildly. I'm looking at two different covers that seem to be pretty reasonable and have interesting features.


Both are from Camping World web site.


The first is PoyPRO 3 (item #120420). While it has a solid topside section which would keep the rain from penetrating the top itself, the sides are breathable allowing moisture to evaporate thus preventing mildew buildup. But will moisture evaporate from under the solid section as well?



The second is the Storage Lot Cover (item # 630226). This seems to have the same material on the top as on the sides, both breathable. It also has additional cinches around the bottom of the cover to help prevent wind getting under the cover, thus reducing chafing of the trailer finish (or so they advertise).


All these considerations aside, I'm looking for the experience from others regarding the construction and materials used, as well as differences in brands. For example, will a solid top cover cause mildew buildup or offer better protection from the elements and UV? And how important is cinching the bottom corners after cinching front and back?



Finally, are there certain materials that last longer then others? From my boating days and living the the south, I recall the intense summer rays degrading canvas covers to where they didn't last more than 2-3 years at best. So is it really worth spending extra bucks for more expensive covers that may need to be replaced regularly anyway?



All experiences and opinions are welcome. Thanks.
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Old 09-04-2020, 01:43 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by jbcrick View Post
Finally, are there certain materials that last longer then others? From my boating days and living the the south, I recall the intense summer rays degrading canvas covers to where they didn't last more than 2-3 years at best. So is it really worth spending extra bucks for more expensive covers that may need to be replaced regularly anyway?
I think your boating experience is a good guide. We've seen lots of rvs with shredded covers in storage lots.
It kind of depends on where you're storing it. What you're trying to do is protect the roof from sun, wind, and snow damage. A carport type storage is probably best and that can be accomplished by something as simple as a tarp and poles.
There's a good pro/con article here https://campaddict.com/best-rv-covers/
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Old 09-05-2020, 08:08 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Reverse_snowbird View Post
I think your boating experience is a good guide...
There's a good pro/con article here https://campaddict.com/best-rv-covers/

Thanks for the input, very good link by the way. It has given me plenty of new points to consider. Certainly the video in the link demonstrates the serious effort it takes to put up a cover. Looks like a PITA. Covering a boat is easy; but climbing up on a trailer takes it to a whole new level.

A cover may not be the best idea considering it would only be covered at most 3 - 3 1/2 months and even less if the winter has a mild break in the weather for camping.

My number one reason for the cover is to provide protection for the vinyl roof, so maybe a better solution is in finding good protection treatments and regular maintenance routines for the roofing material and keeping it clean.

Perhaps I should research that further as well. As usual all suggestions and experiences are welcome.
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Old 09-05-2020, 08:44 AM   #4
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I used to use the Poly Pro on my campers in PA. I would get 2-3 years out of them, but you need to check they every couple weeks to make sure they are not coming loose. You also need to protect them from sharp edges like gutter ends. I used to cut pieces off foam noodles to fit over down spouts.
also any racks on roof turns into a swimming pool as they collect water. I have used 1" plastic pipe as supports with varying success.



in my new home I use a metal frame with tap on it for full time protection from the sun and rain
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Old 09-05-2020, 10:58 AM   #5
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My reason for buying a cover is keeping the sun off it for the part of the year that I'm not using it, about 6 months I bought this same cover for our last 2 trailers. I had the first one for 3 years and it held up well in Eastern Washington. I usually put it on late September and it stays on through April. It's not on in the summer time because I use the trailer so it doesn't have to withstand the hot sun but it does go through snow and wind in the winters. After 3 years, there were a few wear marks and a couple small holes but nothing that would affect its function. It is heavy material but I fold it and roll it up to make it easy to install once up on the roof of my trailer. I just unroll it and flip the sides over the edge. I do keep my trailer waxed and have never had an issue with chafing like was mention in the article that Reverse_Snowbird linked. I do like TowPro said and use pool noodles for the gutters and closed cell foam to pad other sharp edges.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 09-05-2020, 01:43 PM   #6
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Try “Rvcovers.com” they currently have a half off sale. Many come with a lifetime replacement warranty. The biggest negative on covers in most posts is that they only last a couple years max. I just ordered mine.
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Old 09-05-2020, 02:48 PM   #7
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Roof

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Originally Posted by jbcrick View Post
My number one reason for the cover is to provide protection for the vinyl roof, so maybe a better solution is in finding good protection treatments and regular maintenance routines for the roofing material and keeping it clean.
The roof of your trailer is likely not vinyl. It could be thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO), but is more likely to be ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM). This material is good for 22-35 years of outside exposure. It is used on buildings that are never covered or sheltered.

Weather issues with your trailer are minor. You can expect to replace roof vents every couple of years. The poor plastic that is used gets destroyed by UV in sunlight. Replacements cost $10-15 and take 20 minutes to install using a screwdriver and long-nose pliers.

Caulking needs to be checked regularly and caulk added where it has cracked or shrunk. Also a minor item.

But you don't need to sweat the roof.
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Old 09-06-2020, 07:57 AM   #8
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we sold our 23ss roo and we have a winter cover for sale only used 1 year because the next year I put up a car port
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Old 09-06-2020, 09:41 AM   #9
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I never saw an RV cover that lasted more than two seasons out here. But of course weather conditions are a little different in NC vs NM.
Everyone I know that tried a cover on their new RV did it once. Including me.
Look at Protectall Rubber Roof Cleaner and separate conditioner. I've had really good luck with them.
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Old 09-06-2020, 11:23 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcrick View Post
I have read several appends regarding covering the trailer for the off season/winter. Lots of warnings about not using plastic tarps because they are not breathable, trap moisture, etc.


Since I started looking at all the choices, I'm seeing where the choices in materials and prices vary wildly. I'm looking at two different covers that seem to be pretty reasonable and have interesting features.


Both are from Camping World web site.


The first is PoyPRO 3 (item #120420). While it has a solid topside section which would keep the rain from penetrating the top itself, the sides are breathable allowing moisture to evaporate thus preventing mildew buildup. But will moisture evaporate from under the solid section as well?



The second is the Storage Lot Cover (item # 630226). This seems to have the same material on the top as on the sides, both breathable. It also has additional cinches around the bottom of the cover to help prevent wind getting under the cover, thus reducing chafing of the trailer finish (or so they advertise).


All these considerations aside, I'm looking for the experience from others regarding the construction and materials used, as well as differences in brands. For example, will a solid top cover cause mildew buildup or offer better protection from the elements and UV? And how important is cinching the bottom corners after cinching front and back?



Finally, are there certain materials that last longer then others? From my boating days and living the the south, I recall the intense summer rays degrading canvas covers to where they didn't last more than 2-3 years at best. So is it really worth spending extra bucks for more expensive covers that may need to be replaced regularly anyway?



All experiences and opinions are welcome. Thanks.
IF, you have the Space & the Dollars, nothing beats a Steel RV Port !!!
We had one built 3 or 4 years ago, back when we had a small Sunseeker, now we have a small Flagstaff TT,
We have been having some Health Problems and have not been able to camp this year, Believe me that SUCKS, so it is nice that our little TT is as clean & protected as it was last Summer ! It was a stretch to pay for RV Port but I believe if we ever sell our home we will get our money back !!!
We built a 16 X 30 Heavy Duty, set in concrete !!! Cost aprox 6K !!!
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Old 09-07-2020, 05:31 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NMWildcat View Post
I never saw an RV cover that lasted more than two seasons out here. But of course weather conditions are a little different in NC vs NM.
Everyone I know that tried a cover on their new RV did it once. Including me.
Look at Protectall Rubber Roof Cleaner and separate conditioner. I've had really good luck with them.
Most the problem people don't protect the rub spots or a proper tie down ,ours is like new yet
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Old 09-07-2020, 04:56 PM   #12
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Canvas cover us definitely the way to go. I have a new A frame pop up that I just purchased a cover for. High winds by me is common. Key to this one was it has three tie downs to keep in place. I recommend using PVC pipe on all sharp corners to keep the cover from ripping. They take the weight off the sharp edge that ges pulled on during wind storms. It was only around $200 so if it only last a few year, still worth it for protecting the trailer.
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Old 09-08-2020, 10:15 AM   #13
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Back when we had a Pop-Up we found a guy that turned an old Chicken Barn into indoor storage, we keep our Pop-Up there for a couple of years !!! @ $15 a month !!!
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