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Old 03-31-2017, 05:43 PM   #21
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With the add on's, and not wanting to always put stuff away, we don't have to....
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Old 03-31-2017, 05:44 PM   #22
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What is the make of the awnings you are talking about. We have a 2014 Georgetown with an electric awning and we hate it. It is too high, too short and too straight out to be of any protection and we can't dip one end without getting out the ladder to reach it. Then, of course the ladder has to stand by, deployed, in case we need to get the awning in fast due to wind or storm. A nice addition to the campsite, NOT! I am not sure the brand without going out to the coach and digging thru the paperwork, but whoever designed it certainly never camped.
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Old 03-31-2017, 05:47 PM   #23
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This one is a Dometic....On a 5er......Turbs might be able to help you out.....He's made a triple length pole set for a customer
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Old 03-31-2017, 06:00 PM   #24
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Have had several manual awnings, always tilted them some just in case it rains. Was excited to get a power awning on our new Crusader. Must admit I never heard of the dump feature till this thread. Mines a Dometic. Figure it's just not worth the brain damage of leaving it out when it's windy, cause it's so easy to put away. A little high to do the tilt thing, but not really an issue when all you have to do to protect it is to push the button till it closes. I rarely leave it out when I'm gone
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Old 03-31-2017, 06:43 PM   #25
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Thanks for all the replies and opinions. But no one has answered the question yet. The manual says to pull it in during high winds but doesn't give any idea what they consider high winds. So back to my original post... Has any one seen one of these awnings succumb to high winds and what kind of wind speeds are we talking about?

I don't remember the brand of our awning and the trailer is currently at the dealership having some warranty work done. Ours is easily adjustable. Just grab the arm and pull it down. Auto dump feature works nicely. Once a gallon or two pools up on the awning, the weight of the water over comes the strength of the gas shock, the arm pulls inward and the water pours off. Then the shock pushes the awning back out.
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Old 03-31-2017, 07:15 PM   #26
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I think you got your answer and that is if you do not have the awning hold down poles then any wind above 15mph you had better put it up. Common sense is the key word. Even with the hold down poles there are limits as Bob has mentioned. I have the system and when winds get to 35 bring it in. Later RJD
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:04 PM   #27
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:19 PM   #28
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I've seen plenty of auto awnings get destroyed beyond repair from winds. Depending on wind direction and speed, it really doesnt take all too much. Before i made my own awning poles, anything over 15mph, i pulled it in. With my awning poles, i typically dont worry about it unless it gets pretty wild.
I cant comment on the auto dump feature. I've always tilted a corner.
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:23 PM   #29
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As mine is 7 years old, the last wind storm in Arizona didn't do it any good....Tread sewn into material started to give up, so now will replace material.....Easier then washing!....lol
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:29 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by KDHfan View Post
I've seen plenty of auto awnings get destroyed beyond repair from winds. Depending on wind direction and speed, it really doesnt take all too much. Before i made my own awning poles, anything over 15mph, i pulled it in. With my awning poles, i typically dont worry about it unless it gets pretty wild.
I cant comment on the auto dump feature. I've always tilted a corner.


Two years back we were camped in SE Nebraska at Indian Cave SP. storm came thru over night and I counted 6 campers with totaled awnings. Two probably had roof damage from it slamming over the top. Ours was held down with OC's self storing awning poles and held up great. Without the poles, 10-15mph winds and the awning gets stowed.
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:40 PM   #31
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With my weather station, I can set an alarm for wind mph.....
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:55 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by mac.dblues View Post
Thanks for all the replies and opinions. But no one has answered the question yet. The manual says to pull it in during high winds but doesn't give any idea what they consider high winds. So back to my original post... Has any one seen one of these awnings succumb to high winds and what kind of wind speeds are we talking about?
mac,
I have a like TT as you have. I do not think you will ever get a speed to pull it in at in writing.

I was camping with a buddy on a lake last year when a gusty rain came rolling across to our side. My buddy ran to his awning to put it up. I had the poles and tie down rig. So I was a bit nervy but waiting to see how the modifications held up. It was spooky but not showing any signs of failure, I was feeling pretty good about it.

The camper across the road started screaming at his wife to retract the awning. The leading edge was higher than his camper. It was not as easy as just retracting it as he had some night lights that were hooked into the a channel of the awning and would not allow it to roll up.

I wanted to watch my setup go this this blow but that camper was in need. My buddy and I ran over and held onto each end of his awning while he removed the light hooks and his wife was able to roll it up. My buddy is the same size as I and both of us had to pull down on the awning pretty well to stop the gust from pushing it over the roof. We both go over the 300 pound mark.

My lesson is that when it happens it happens fast and there is no warning to alert you. I could not tell you what the wind speed was.

Your question is akin to asking how many smokes can I have before I will suffer an adverse effect. This one of those kind of things...
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:59 PM   #33
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For that reason, my outer awning lights were in the sunshade groove and the wire connection comes apart easy when you retract awning
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Old 04-01-2017, 07:11 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Sandy B View Post
What is the make of the awnings you are talking about. We have a 2014 Georgetown with an electric awning and we hate it. It is too high, too short and too straight out to be of any protection and we can't dip one end without getting out the ladder to reach it. Then, of course the ladder has to stand by, deployed, in case we need to get the awning in fast due to wind or storm. A nice addition to the campsite, NOT! I am not sure the brand without going out to the coach and digging thru the paperwork, but whoever designed it certainly never camped.


You can adjust the awning so it is not so high and strait and it will still retract and extend normally, you don,t need to put it back to the original position .
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Old 04-01-2017, 07:37 AM   #35
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Thumbs up power awning wind resistance

Since we have already lost 2 awnings, we don't take chances on leaving awning out if we aren't going to be home. Both times, it was a bright sunny day when we left home, and a gust of wind came up and down went the awning!!!! So, we have learned a costly lesson!!!!!
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Old 04-01-2017, 07:56 AM   #36
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Could someone post a pic of awning poles and deflapper poles being mentioned? I assume you are saying somehow you use them with the Solera style retractable/adjustable system... I don't see how poles could be attached without defeating the design purpose. Thanks!
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Old 04-01-2017, 07:57 AM   #37
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Look back in thread....
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Old 04-01-2017, 08:08 AM   #38
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See it - thanks
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Old 04-01-2017, 08:17 AM   #39
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I'm curious to know how much wind your power awning has taken and if anyone has had one tear up from wind yet. If so, what kind of wind speeds did it succumb to?

A lot of people are scared to death to leave them out when the slightest breeze blows up, but in theory they should actually be more wind resistant than their manual counterparts.

Think about this. When we know it is going to rain, everyone runs outside and lowers one end of their manual awning because they don't want rain to pool on top of it. With the power awnings, you no longer have to worry about that because they will self dump when water pools enough to drop one end automatically. (I do usually lower the end away from my entry door to direct the auto dump feature away from the door, but it isn't necessary.) So... when the wind gets up and lifts the awning, the same should occur in the opposite direction. Wind gusts, awning lifts, arms automatically retract, wind dies down, arms stretch back out.

Now, I'm not talking about leaving the awning out with a severe thunderstorm blowing in that has a history of 60 mph winds in it. Heck, I wouldn't leave a manual awning out in that kind of weather, even with it anchored down. I'm talking about those 20 to 30 mph gusts that can sneak up on you on a nice day on the side of a lake.
Power Awning more wind resistance than Manual Awning ???
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Old 04-01-2017, 08:23 AM   #40
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With help they're close.....
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