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Old 09-24-2018, 06:53 PM   #1
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2019 Refrigerator

Question: Our new 36CK2 has an inverter for refrigerator.

When RV plugged into shore power green light is on, showing 12.6 volts, all is well.
When unplugged from shore power and plugged into truck, NO light is illuminated on the inverter, and the voltage shows on the inverter 12.1 volts.
I'm asking, when traveling down the road, I assumed that the trucks 12 volt system would feed the inverter allowing the refrigerator to operate.
Am I wrong?
Thanks!
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Old 09-24-2018, 06:59 PM   #2
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You are correct. Turn the inverter on by pressing the button, then the fridge will work on the road.
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Old 09-24-2018, 07:03 PM   #3
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The button was pushed in to "ON", and that is when it showed the image of a 12volt car battery with voltage showing 11.9 volts. The inverter was turned on at the dealer when we picked it up and never have touched it. When plugged into shore power the light on the inverter glows green and shows 12.? volts. The refrigerator works fine. I guess I must check it again tomorrow. I will unplug shore power and see what happens to inverter.
Thank you
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Old 09-24-2018, 07:14 PM   #4
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what is the make / model of the inverter?

i would not assume that the truck's 12 volt system will feed the inverter to run the refrigerator. the primary source of 12 volt power for the inverter is your house batteries. any assistance in 12 volt power from the truck helps, but it probably is not enough to run the inverter by itself.
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Old 09-24-2018, 07:25 PM   #5
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I thought mine was turned on also, but when I realized it wasn't working on the road, I pushed the button. The fan came on and the light turned red.
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Old 09-25-2018, 09:30 PM   #6
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Technically you are correct. Practically the answer is no. Ubnless the frigid get is really small.

While your truck has a big enough alternator to recharge your batteries that was not why it was installed. It is there for aftermarket accessories like plow equipment. And to recharge a starting battery.

Most manufactures run relatively small lines to the plug in back. The rv guys also run normally small wires to the battery.

Line loss with 12 volt systems is very high. Thus they only charge the battery a little. You generally have to run another big wire to the rv battery. Your battery reading supports that. Should be over 13.

Residential refrigerators consume batteries very quickly. Boondocking is not likely. Two twelve volt batteries will not last a night likely.

If you run your battery to below 12 volts often then the capacity of the batteries Is damaged. 12.1 is about 50% and should not be used.

So, possibly the truck is not connected-check with a voltmeter at your hitch.

Possibly the batteries are damaged.

Possibly the car dealer took the fuse out of the system, or there never was one.
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Old 09-26-2018, 08:21 PM   #7
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I guess I'm confused.

The trucks 12v system does not 'feed' the inverter. When plugged to the trucks 12v system, the truck supplies some charge to the batteries. The inverter then sucks the voltage from these batteries and converts it to 120v and powers the refrigerator.

I have 4 six-volt batteries and a 1000w inverter. I turn it on by pushing a button. I usually turn it off when connected to shore power. My refrigerator runs 8 hours at a very minimum without connecting to shore power, even if truck not connected for some of those hours. I suspect it'd run a LOT longer than that on those batteries. I also imagine that the trucks 12v system merely slows the rate of 12v battery decay some. I doubt it'd charge the batteries totally ever.
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Old 09-27-2018, 10:09 AM   #8
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You guys are making me think I should go with the propane refrigerator.

I will be traveling and boon docking a lot. So are you guys happy with the residential frig?
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Old 09-27-2018, 10:12 AM   #9
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I'm very happy. 2nd best thing on my unit. BUT.........if you boondock without a ton of solar and high end batteries, maybe not for you. We are almost always at FHU sites.
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Old 09-27-2018, 10:27 AM   #10
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I have four six volt Trojans and my residential refrigerator will run for four days without running my batteries below 60%. I have tested it out. I boondock some too. I usually run my Hondaís for air conditioner so they charge the batteries too. DW would not go back to a propane refrigerator. Our residential refrigerator keeps food colder plus we have a ice maker
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Old 09-27-2018, 10:29 AM   #11
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dilemma!

my understanding is that a full size absorption refrigerator is pretty expensive. so it is going to cost some dollars to pull the residential refrigerator out and put an absorption one in. it would also cost a bit to put in additional batteries, solar, or generator to increase the run time on the residential refrigerator.

what to do?
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Old 09-27-2018, 10:32 AM   #12
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We really like the full size fridge. We only have 2 12V batteries and have not had a problem while traveling. We do stay with FHU and have not done any boon docking.
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Old 09-27-2018, 10:37 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indymule View Post
We really like the full size fridge. We only have 2 12V batteries and have not had a problem while traveling. We do stay with FHU and have not done any boon docking.
No problems here either even in the dead of summer refrigerator stays on and batteries charged.
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Old 09-27-2018, 11:00 AM   #14
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Also , I assume that your truck output voltage was read when truck was off or maybe idling , when the truck is underway and you have some RPM the voltage will move up , well into 13 volts .
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Old 09-27-2018, 12:14 PM   #15
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Choosing which refrigerator is tough.

A gas electric runs for a long time on the gas. However, it does use battery, but a lot less.

Both have pluses and minuses.

Keep,in mind P=VI.

Get the Watts to operate the residential fridge. Add 15% for inverters loss. All fridges are different. Big ones use more.

Divide by 12.5 volts. That gives you the use per hour in amps. Running time depends on the outside temperature. South Texas is different than North Dakota.

A marine 12 volt battery has about 40 amps to give. I have 4 6 volts and have about 260 amps. We choose a 13 cubic foot rv fridge. Big enough for the DW and I. We can boondock for 3-4 days easy without a connection.

If you have a built in generator the answer is easy.
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