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Old 09-26-2022, 05:57 PM   #1
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Best sealant for screw holes?

First issue I will be tackling in our renovation is slide topper fabric replacement but before that, I want to take off the rail the fabric attaches to the RV wall. The trim piece that covered (was supposed to cover) the screws was rotted and many screws go rusty. We think this was one of the reasons for our ceiling/wall/floor water damage due to water penetration through screws and poor maintenance of sealant on the back corner of the RV. When I clean it all up and screw the rail back in, want to fill the holes with sealant to plug any water to get in…what’s the best sealant to use in this situation?
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Old 09-26-2022, 06:22 PM   #2
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Chemlink M1 sealant .
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Old 09-26-2022, 06:30 PM   #3
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ProFLexRV.
Whatever you do don't use Silicone. And put a bead around anything you attach to the RV,
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Old 09-26-2022, 06:33 PM   #4
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M1 will cure underwater.
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Old 09-26-2022, 06:33 PM   #5
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Old 09-27-2022, 02:25 PM   #6
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Sealing the rail

Quote:
Originally Posted by AngryBear View Post
First issue I will be tackling in our renovation is slide topper fabric replacement but before that, I want to take off the rail the fabric attaches to the RV wall. The trim piece that covered (was supposed to cover) the screws was rotted and many screws go rusty. We think this was one of the reasons for our ceiling/wall/floor water damage due to water penetration through screws and poor maintenance of sealant on the back corner of the RV. When I clean it all up and screw the rail back in, want to fill the holes with sealant to plug any water to get in…what’s the best sealant to use in this situation?
Sealing the rail customarily begins by putting a strip of butyl tape behind the rail. Whether you apply it to the back of the rail or to the side of the RV first is up to you.

That vinyl trim insert (readily available on eBay and Amazon in many colors) usually doesn't split and admit water. If not anchored properly at the ends, it does shrink and expose the first screw or two, but otherwise seems okay.

The real problem that permits water intrusion into the 1x2 at the top of the wall and then into the roof decking is AWNING BRACKETS! I have (too often) seen soft spots on the roof, right at the awning brackets. No sealant is used. They impede the flow of water and leaves and pine straw in the rain gutter and water floods into the wall at the bracket bolts. This has happened on two of our trailers.
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Old 09-27-2022, 06:56 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
Sealing the rail customarily begins by putting a strip of butyl tape behind the rail. Whether you apply it to the back of the rail or to the side of the RV first is up to you.

That vinyl trim insert (readily available on eBay and Amazon in many colors) usually doesn't split and admit water. If not anchored properly at the ends, it does shrink and expose the first screw or two, but otherwise seems okay.

The real problem that permits water intrusion into the 1x2 at the top of the wall and then into the roof decking is AWNING BRACKETS! I have (too often) seen soft spots on the roof, right at the awning brackets. No sealant is used. They impede the flow of water and leaves and pine straw in the rain gutter and water floods into the wall at the bracket bolts. This has happened on two of our trailers.
I wish I could figure out how to upload pic from iPad but the junction of the “gutter”, rail for slide topper and back seal of the roof to RV wall is a mess…I think that is where the water came in. The RV is a 2005 and don’t think anyone ever replaced/inspected the trim inserts…they were weather/rotted/crack and full of dirt/pine straw/etc
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Old 09-27-2022, 07:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngryBear View Post
I wish I could figure out how to upload pic from iPad but the junction of the “gutter”, rail for slide topper and back seal of the roof to RV wall is a mess…I think that is where the water came in. The RV is a 2005 and don’t think anyone ever replaced/inspected the trim inserts…they were weather/rotted/crack and full of dirt/pine straw/etc
Looks like you got the picture uploaded, even though it is sideways. For this forum, always take pictures with the button on the right to get them to render properly.

A worse spot is where the roof membrane tucks under the transition molding, across the back and down the side. This is worse than the gutter rails. Is the front equally bad? The caulk everyone prefers is Dicor Lap Sealant. It does shrink. The regular maintenance is to scrub it clean and gob some more lap sealant on/over the cracks. The alternative is to scrub the area clean and apply 4" wide Eternabond tape over the full length. Eternabond claims to be good for 10 years. In my experience it's good for 12 or 13. Then you put another layer over it. Our Cherokee 38P is a 2008, and I did just applied more Eternabond this summer. It sits outside with no cover all the time.

You really need to determine whether there are any soft spots on the roof decking and whether there is any evidence of water intrusion on the inside, before you decide on what action to take. If you have no water intrusion and no soft spots, you could simply replace the trim insert, and either apply more Dicor lap sealant or apply Eternabond. When you replace the insert, remember that it shrinks. I replaced ours (38' long) 5-6 years ago and had to do it again this summer because it shrunk. This time I just left 3-4" of extra at each end. Some manufacturers loosen the metal rail and fold the extra trim behind it.
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Old 09-27-2022, 07:51 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
Looks like you got the picture uploaded, even though it is sideways. For this forum, always take pictures with the button on the right to get them to render properly.

A worse spot is where the roof membrane tucks under the transition molding, across the back and down the side. This is worse than the gutter rails. Is the front equally bad? The caulk everyone prefers is Dicor Lap Sealant. It does shrink. The regular maintenance is to scrub it clean and gob some more lap sealant on/over the cracks. The alternative is to scrub the area clean and apply 4" wide Eternabond tape over the full length. Eternabond claims to be good for 10 years. In my experience it's good for 12 or 13. Then you put another layer over it. Our Cherokee 38P is a 2008, and I did just applied more Eternabond this summer. It sits outside with no cover all the time.

You really need to determine whether there are any soft spots on the roof decking and whether there is any evidence of water intrusion on the inside, before you decide on what action to take. If you have no water intrusion and no soft spots, you could simply replace the trim insert, and either apply more Dicor lap sealant or apply Eternabond. When you replace the insert, remember that it shrinks. I replaced ours (38' long) 5-6 years ago and had to do it again this summer because it shrunk. This time I just left 3-4" of extra at each end. Some manufacturers loosen the metal rail and fold the extra trim behind it.
There was sign of water intrusion. The ceiling, wall next to the slide and main floor had water damage. All below where this pic was taken. Haven’t ripped down the ceiling yet to see how bad it is.
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Old 09-27-2022, 08:16 PM   #10
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Personnaly, I use urethane caulk/bonding. It cures well even if the surfaces are damp.

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Old 09-27-2022, 08:20 PM   #11
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Don't rip down the ceiling yet

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Originally Posted by AngryBear View Post
There was sign of water intrusion. The ceiling, wall next to the slide and main floor had water damage. All below where this pic was taken. Haven’t ripped down the ceiling yet to see how bad it is.
Don't rip down the ceiling yet. First get on the roof and find out how the decking is. Pick a spot where it is unlikely to have intrusion. Put your ladder there and climb to the roof. Move around--hands and knees might be best--and test each spot with your hands before putting weight on it. Find all the bad spots. If they are of any size at all, you are facing the task of stripping the roof and replacing the decking, at least in bad areas. The damaged ceiling is attached to the roof trusses. Some of them may need to be replaced, too. Easier to start at the top than the bottom.

When DW came to me in 2012, her dowry was a 2002 22-foot Northwood Nash trailer. She had bought it used and full-timed in it for six years. It had leaks when she got it and they hadn't been fixed well. There were soft spots by both awning brackets, two leaks at the front transition (left corner and center) similar to your back transition piece, and everything in the back was soft for the first six feet from the back.

I've taken the rails loose for five feet in the front, pulled off the transition piece, and replaced/repaired two roof trusses. There's a 1x2 strip that runs all the way around the trailer, atop the 2x2 header on the wall. The truss end and the on-edge 1x2 share the 2x2. Screws horizontally through the 1x2 into the trusses hold them in place. Screws vertically through the 1x2 hold the assembly to the wall. When I had rebuilt the trusses and 1x2 framing and had it screwed in place, I used fast-set construction adhesive, shot between the truss bottom and the ceiling panel, to anchor the ceiling. I shot the adhesive, my son pushed the ceiling up and let it drop, waited a couple of minutes and pushed it again where it stuck.

I cleaned the bottom of the roof membrane and used the proper contact cement. My son and I pulled the membrane in place and let it set. Once it had set, I replaced the front transition piece. That's a sandwich, designed to withstand the water you get when driving 60 mph through a rainstorm. First the membrane goes metal piece that comes up from the front--the metal overlaps the membrane. Then a layer of butyl tape between the membrane and metal. Then another layer of butyl tape on the transition piece, placed so half is over metal and half over membrane.

The back (not started yet) is layered differently, membrane over metal.
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Old 09-27-2022, 10:32 PM   #12
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Ok Folks , Dicor is JUNK plain and simple . It's not a adhesive like people think it is . It's a water diverter that's it and it doesn't even do that good . Any adhesive applied to a TPO material has to have a TPO primer applied first . Dicor doesn't even stick to tpo . It's a ripoff. Anything that says RV sealant is a junk product .
Those inserts on the trim of trailers do t keep water out . Water enters the molding follows the crooked screw or stripped screw and you have hidden water intrusion that may take time to appear, but it's there , even in brand new rigs . I spent 200 hours to make my rig water proof, top, bottom , sides . Literally I'm guessing 400 exterior screws all pulled and holes sealed and screws back in .
Keep buying the Dicor and tape and you get what you get .my rant is over lol
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