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Old 01-18-2018, 09:29 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by moshe1436 View Post
I thought the OP was talking about electric disc brakes. No hydraulic lines needed?
No such thing as electric disc brakes.
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Old 01-18-2018, 11:08 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by moshe1436 View Post
How would you rate the difficulty for a reasonably handy guy with an average range of tools. Any special tools required? What would you consider to be the most difficult part of the job? How difficult to adjust the new brakes? Canít afford a pro to do it but would consider it myself. Thanks!
It all depends on if your handy guy comment is in automotive. If you repack your own brakes and not take your trailer to a mechanic I would say that is half the battle. Pulling the backing plates was very easy. The hardest part as was noted by someone else in the post would be running your hydraulic lines, bleeding and wiring the Hydrastar. There are some good videos on YouTube on how to do it. If your field was never working on cars you might be over your head. I chose the slip on rotors because if I ever need to resurface them I won't need to pull the hubs. BTW, my kit came with Chinese bearings and races so they never made it on the trailer. I pressed out the races and installed NTN bearings and races. The brake lines that we're included we're too long so I cut them to the length I needed and reflaired. That is where it may get a little more involved for some people.
I hope this helps.
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Old 01-19-2018, 07:53 AM   #23
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It all depends on if your handy guy comment is in automotive. If you repack your own brakes and not take your trailer to a mechanic I would say that is half the battle. Pulling the backing plates was very easy. The hardest part as was noted by someone else in the post would be running your hydraulic lines, bleeding and wiring the Hydrastar. There are some good videos on YouTube on how to do it. If your field was never working on cars you might be over your head. I chose the slip on rotors because if I ever need to resurface them I won't need to pull the hubs. BTW, my kit came with Chinese bearings and races so they never made it on the trailer. I pressed out the races and installed NTN bearings and races. The brake lines that we're included we're too long so I cut them to the length I needed and reflaired. That is where it may get a little more involved for some people.
I hope this helps.
Yes a lot of good info here and I appreciate your honesty concerning my ability to do the job. Iíve had considerable experience with hydraulic brakes on boat trailers including installing tandem axles and quad brakes, actuators, hydraulic lines and electrics but that was quite a few years ago. Now at 82 I probably should have some else tackle the project. I just wasnít aware that disc brakes are never electric.
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Old 01-19-2018, 01:05 PM   #24
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The actuator is electric. The brakes are hydraulic.
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Old 01-19-2018, 01:22 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by 97flhtcui View Post
It all depends on if your handy guy comment is in automotive. If you repack your own brakes and not take your trailer to a mechanic I would say that is half the battle. Pulling the backing plates was very easy. The hardest part as was noted by someone else in the post would be running your hydraulic lines, bleeding and wiring the Hydrastar. There are some good videos on YouTube on how to do it. If your field was never working on cars you might be over your head. I chose the slip on rotors because if I ever need to resurface them I won't need to pull the hubs. BTW, my kit came with Chinese bearings and races so they never made it on the trailer. I pressed out the races and installed NTN bearings and races. The brake lines that we're included we're too long so I cut them to the length I needed and reflaired. That is where it may get a little more involved for some people.
I hope this helps.
Double flare isn't difficult...assuming. The kit(China) isn't expensive anymore($30 Amazon). It does take a little practice on scraps to get it. Don't run the tool down too tight to prevent breaking the tool on the 1st stage of the process and larger sizes 5/16-1/2" can be a challenge. 1/4" and smaller should be pretty easy. One could/can "curl-pig tail" a portion of the line in an area that isn't in the way. I have used a piece of 3/4-1" pipe to wrap 3/16" around and "curl" the tube. YMMV
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Old 01-19-2018, 02:04 PM   #26
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The actuator is electric. The brakes are hydraulic.
I just looked at a couple of good videos showing how to convert to disc brakes and totally understand why I was missing the point about elec/hydraulic brakes. I should have looked at these before I posted! Thanks for clarifying everything for me!
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Old 01-19-2018, 02:14 PM   #27
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We faced that dilemma when my son purchased his 69 Chevelle with the 454 and drum brakes. Are Disc brakes a good change? The answer is yes, in a car.

However, the reason the automotive world went to disc brakes was:
Cheaper parts
Easier installation
Easily changed pads
Mechanicsí often messed up the Drums when assembling
Worked better in the rain
Self adjusting
Better cooling

Did you notice that generally stopping ability was not on the list? Except in the rain.

Likely there is not a great difference between properly maintained drums and discs on dry pavement. Also modern diesels all have exhaust brakes. Cooling is less of an issue.

So if your brakes are well adjusted and working and you have a diesel and you seldom drive in the rain. You are in pretty good shape.

Yep I would rather have them however they are expensive. I bought mom a convection microwave, a washer & dryer, back up camera(for me), and a better mattress.
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Old 01-19-2018, 02:28 PM   #28
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Not that this is within topic... I had a '68 Road Runner converted to 440 CID and it would go pretty fast. It had 4 wheel drum brakes and stopped very well....yes I redid the brakes with newer products.

Back to your topic now...
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Old 01-19-2018, 03:21 PM   #29
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tomkatb ... I can tell by your reply that you'd be hard to sway on any given subject once you made a decision. That being said ... I can also see you have no idea of the night and day difference between disk and drum brakes on say a 10,000# on up fifth wheel RV. Stopping distance is unbelievably less and just the general feel when you step on the brakes in your truck is way more comfortable. The wheels run cooler and brake pads are much easier to change when time comes. Yes, I have a diesel, yes I am a mechanic by trade, yes I installed my own disk brake system, and yes I drive in rain. Switching to disk brakes gave me peace of mind and peace of mind is priceless.
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Old 01-19-2018, 03:40 PM   #30
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Installing the disk brakes was above my pay grade. Itís like night and day difference. It never feels like the camper is pushing me. Piece of mind. It was expensive but what the heck camper was expensive.
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Old 01-19-2018, 03:54 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by tomkatb View Post
We faced that dilemma when my son purchased his 69 Chevelle with the 454 and drum brakes. Are Disc brakes a good change? The answer is yes, in a car.

However, the reason the automotive world went to disc brakes was:
Cheaper parts
Easier installation
Easily changed pads
Mechanicsí often messed up the Drums when assembling
Worked better in the rain
Self adjusting
Better cooling

Did you notice that generally stopping ability was not on the list? Except in the rain.

Likely there is not a great difference between properly maintained drums and discs on dry pavement. Also modern diesels all have exhaust brakes. Cooling is less of an issue.

So if your brakes are well adjusted and working and you have a diesel and you seldom drive in the rain. You are in pretty good shape.

Yep I would rather have them however they are expensive. I bought mom a convection microwave, a washer & dryer, back up camera(for me), and a better mattress.
It's on this list:

Differences Between Drum Brakes And Disc Brakes

Here's a cut/paste from it:
What is important to keep in mind is that either brake system is going to bring the car to a stop; the disc brake just does it more efficiently.

No one argues that they are not more expensive. Expense is a consideration, but in the business of camping and trailers, it seems expensive is just part of the process.
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Old 01-19-2018, 10:16 PM   #32
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Anyone that has ever driven an auto coming down a mountain that had drum brakes will appreciate how bad drum brakes are at fading.

To say that disc brakes don't help you stop faster because of the fade issue is ignoring the greatest benefit of disc brakes.

There is a reason that heavy tractors are switching to disc both in the US and in Europe with tightening requirements for stopping distance. To say that stopping distance is not the reason to switch to disc brakes is just not factual.
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Old 01-20-2018, 12:19 AM   #33
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Yes a lot of good info here and I appreciate your honesty concerning my ability to do the job. Iíve had considerable experience with hydraulic brakes on boat trailers including installing tandem axles and quad brakes, actuators, hydraulic lines and electrics but that was quite a few years ago. Now at 82 I probably should have some else tackle the project. I just wasnít aware that disc brakes are never electric.
With that resume and the instructions that come with the brake kit I do think you would have no problem tackling this project. As far as your age, if you had someone doing some of the work with your instruction I can see the installation happen. The running the brake line and wiring the Hydrastar and bleeding the brakes will take time and thought. My kit cost $1,600 including bearings and races. Most use the bearings that come with the kit. I pack my bearings every year and have seen the wear and Don't want to be broke down on the side of the road. Hopefully I answered your questions.
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Old 01-20-2018, 01:06 AM   #34
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I'll have disc brakes when they come from the factory that way. My measly cheap ass drum brakes and the huge brakes on the Duramax tv work fine for now......
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Old 01-20-2018, 06:58 AM   #35
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Went through that with my 2007 Cedar Creek 37 RDQS stayed to Mor/Ryde they did an excellent job even give you lunch every day on them. Also had the Independent Suspension added, then the next year totaled that rig long story.

But I can say the disc brakes are SUPER and you will love the difference. After the wreck we got our now used rig 2011 CC Touring Edition a few years ago so far have not changed anything.

I also just had all the decals taken off the 2007 I totaled in Indiana and had the rig painted striping on the Touring Edition has painted stripes.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:29 AM   #36
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Thanks! Appreciate your reply. There is no doubt in my mind that disc brakes are the way to go. Just have to come up with the $ and a helper! Meanwhile I’m struggling with trailer brakes that cause the rig to act like a bucking bronco when coming to a stop. Had a trailer tech check it out but told me I didn’t have the controller set correctly. No matter what I do I can only stop this by reducing the stopping resistance down to practically nothing or feathering the pedal when almost stopped. Not happy with these brakes right now.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:38 AM   #37
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Might try a different controller first. Would be a lot cheaper and simpler. I have had several different controllers, and they all act slightly different.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:38 AM   #38
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We had the MORRyde Independent Suspension with disc brakes installed last June and what a difference in stopping power. The Hydrastar system has worked flawlessly as will the others Iím sure.
X2 I also had the MORryde IS with Disc Brakes installed, It is unbelievable the stopping power of the disc. and the Ride of the IS
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Old 01-20-2018, 09:00 AM   #39
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Might try a different controller first. Would be a lot cheaper and simpler. I have had several different controllers, and they all act slightly different.
I have the Prodigy 2 controller which is close to the top from what I've been told.

I'm wondering if the brakes need to be adjusted. Bought this 2014 trailer 6 months ago and from what I've discovered so far is the previous owner did absolutely nothing in terms of maintenance which makes me wonder about the brakes, themselves.
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Old 01-20-2018, 09:02 AM   #40
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I have the Prodigy 2 controller which is close to the top from what I've been told.

I'm wondering if the brakes need to be adjusted. Bought this 2014 trailer 6 months ago and from what I've discovered so far is the previous owner did absolutely nothing in terms of maintenance which makes me wonder about the brakes, themselves.
I would certainly look at them, and adjust, while repacking wheel bearings
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