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Old 10-23-2020, 03:00 PM   #21
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Try putting Ford heavy duty in and click continue

I tried that. It says "Gasoline engines???????..See light truck listing."

If they haven't updated their chart in 3 years, they are not working hard to earn my business.
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Old 10-23-2020, 06:50 PM   #22
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Thanks everyone that has replied to my post. I feel better about ordering the Fumoto value.
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Old 10-24-2020, 08:19 PM   #23
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I tried that. It says "Gasoline engines???????..See light truck listing."

If they haven't updated their chart in 3 years, they are not working hard to earn my business.



FORD(HEAVY DUTY) > Choose a year > ^ CLICK To Continue >Choose a Model ^ All other Diesel Engines > SEARCH

and get a list





Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2020-10-24 at 9.21.52 PM.png
Views:	33
Size:	72.0 KB
ID:	241837
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Old 10-24-2020, 08:50 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Stank Bait View Post
FORD(HEAVY DUTY) > Choose a year > ^ CLICK To Continue >Choose a Model ^ All other Diesel Engines > SEARCH

and get a list


Attachment 241837
Yep. I saw that. But, as expected, selecting “All other Diesel Engines” still doesn’t help with the Ford 6.8 V10, or 7.3 V8 gasoline engines, which is what is in FR3 motorhomes, and also in the E450. I realize this is the FR3 forum, but since it uses the same gasoline engines as the E-450, I was hoping to see a Fumoto application chart for those engines.
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Old 10-24-2020, 09:28 PM   #25
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Ford used the same plug from 2000ish on. 5.0, 5.7, 6.0, 6.7, 6.8, 7.3..... from the Crown Vic and Mustang to the 450. M14 x 1.5
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Old 10-29-2020, 06:45 PM   #26
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Just installed the fumoto valve on my ford F-530 GeorgeTown M/H, looked at many reviews, all good.
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Old 10-29-2020, 06:54 PM   #27
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Thanks everyone that has replied to my post. I feel better about ordering the Fumoto value.
Please come back and let us know how you made out. Thanks and enjoy
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Old 10-29-2020, 08:22 PM   #28
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Fumoto

I've used them on four different Toyotas since the 1990's. Never a problem, always makes oil changes much easier, no gaskets to replace like a standard plug
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Old 10-29-2020, 10:54 PM   #29
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Gotta laugh at the people who let it drain for 20 minutes to make sure they get all the dirty oil out. Of course the problem with the Fumoto valve is that since it threads into your pan, the oil between its threads and the bottom of the pan will never come out!

I will never waste my money on a Fumoto valve.
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:28 PM   #30
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Gotta laugh at the people who let it drain for 20 minutes to make sure they get all the dirty oil out. Of course the problem with the Fumoto valve is that since it threads into your pan, the oil between its threads and the bottom of the pan will never come out!

I will never waste my money on a Fumoto valve.
Funny thing is that even using the oil pan drain plug its common for anywhere from a 1/2 to a quart still remaining in the engine including the oil pan. In fact a suction method is now being used on cars called siphoning that is used in removing oil in motorboats. Its a more thorough method to remove most of the oil from an engine widely used on marine engines since its a lot tougher to change oil in them.
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:40 PM   #31
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Fumoto Valve

I just looked up these valves and seem to come wit no nipple or short nipple and a long nipple. Which one have you all ordered and used?
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Old 10-30-2020, 06:15 AM   #32
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I think they are convenient , but the restriction on flow usually means there are some contaminates left in there. I like a vigorous flow that gives a better flushing.
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Old 10-30-2020, 08:05 AM   #33
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I just looked up these valves and seem to come wit no nipple or short nipple and a long nipple. Which one have you all ordered and used?
Personal preference. I use the long nipple on them all. Easier for a hose to be connected. Though, I do not use a hose on the truck since a bucket fits just fine.
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I think they are convenient , but the restriction on flow usually means there are some contaminates left in there. I like a vigorous flow that gives a better flushing.
Its not a black tank. If you drain the oil when it is warm any junk is going to be in suspension. If there is sludge then that is a totally different issue that needs to be addressed.
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Old 10-30-2020, 09:30 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by bradbill View Post
Gotta laugh at the people who let it drain for 20 minutes to make sure they get all the dirty oil out. Of course the problem with the Fumoto valve is that since it threads into your pan, the oil between its threads and the bottom of the pan will never come out!

I will never waste my money on a Fumoto valve.
Will if you own a 6.7L Cummins engine, it will take that long to drain even without the use of a Fumoto drain valve. There is a lot of oil in the valvetrain when you go to drain.

The best reason I like for using a Fumoto style drain valve, is you do not get an oil bath when changing the oil. I simply open up the valve and let the three gallons of oil from the engine drain into the catch basin. This way I do not get an oil bath when changing with a drain plug that is being open as you move your hand out of the way as the oil gushes out.
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Old 10-30-2020, 09:37 AM   #35
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Gotta laugh at the people who let it drain for 20 minutes to make sure they get all the dirty oil out. Of course the problem with the Fumoto valve is that since it threads into your pan, the oil between its threads and the bottom of the pan will never come out!

I will never waste my money on a Fumoto valve.
Laugh at others if that's what makes you feel good. Before laughing out loud, do you understand that even if some dirty oil can't drain, extended drain time will still get more of what will drain?

While laughing at others, can you prove Fumoto prevents a complete drain? I don't use the Fumoto, so I can't analyze or experiment, but the fact that it threads into the oil pan proves nothing. Are you assuming it the threads are too long and extend above the the pan floor? Do you have reliable information on this? I'm sure Fumoto considered this issue, and I see no reason they would design a plug that traps oil.

Even if it did, whatever dirty oil that comes out in that 20+ minutes still comes out. Even if Fumoto does retain dirty oil, that's no reason to leave even more dirty oil by truncating drain time.

Still laughing?
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Old 10-30-2020, 09:59 AM   #36
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I'm thinking that since an oil pan is about 1/16" thick, or so, there has to be an inside raised area around the drain hole. For the drain plug threads.


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Old 10-30-2020, 10:00 AM   #37
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Funny thing is that even using the oil pan drain plug its common for anywhere from a 1/2 to a quart still remaining in the engine including the oil pan. In fact a suction method is now being used on cars called siphoning that is used in removing oil in motorboats. Its a more thorough method to remove most of the oil from an engine widely used on marine engines since its a lot tougher to change oil in them.
Agreed that dirty oil remains in the "engine," but I doubt much remains in most "pans," which should be designed to drain completely.

I hear you and many others claim that suction removes more oil than draining, but not everyone agrees. I don't doubt that the vacuum pump sellers claim they remove more oil. I'm not convinced, but I'm open to being convinced.

Can you provide or refer us to an explanation of how a pump can get to oil that won't drain? I don't see how suction can get to the places where the oil is trapped in the "engine." I can see how it might get more oil out of a faulty pan that traps oil, but I would think that most pans don't trap any oil.

I can see how an extractor THEORETICALLY could get more oil than draining FOR A POORLY DESIGNED OIL PAN, but I'm still not convinced an extractor gets everything out of the bottom of the pan.
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Old 10-30-2020, 10:04 AM   #38
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Will some people do not under stand how things are manufactured. Most but not all oil pans are not thick enough to provide the three or four thread engagement required to hold a drain plug in place. What manufactures do is weld a boss on the inside of the pan approximate 10mm high to provide the required thread engagement. So, there is always some residue amount of oil left in the pan.
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Old 10-30-2020, 10:09 AM   #39
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I'm thinking that since an oil pan is about 1/16" thick, or so, there has to be an inside raised area around the drain hole. For the drain plug threads.


Rich
This does not apply for all pans, and 1/16" is not very significant, but it makes me think: SOME oil pans have a SIDE drain, and I do think that would typically prevent an ounce or few from draining. So a SIDE DRAIN PAN might be an example of where an extractor MIGHT get a little more oil than pulling the plug. I'm still not convinced that the extractor gets ALL the oil from the pan. I guess one could do an experiment and see if they can extract any oil after pulling the plug and letting it drain a couple hours.

Most of the pans I've pulled are designed so that all of the oil drains. A steel pan can do this with a sump that overcomes the thickness issue you mention. EVERY aluminum pan I've seen has no lip whatsoever to retain any oil at all.
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Old 10-30-2020, 10:13 AM   #40
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Will some people do not under stand how things are manufactured. Most but not all oil pans are not thick enough to provide the three or four thread engagement required to hold a drain plug in place. What manufactures do is weld a boss on the inside of the pan approximate 10mm high to provide the required thread engagement. So, there is always some residue amount of oil left in the pan.
True for some pans. Aluminum pans don't need a welded boss and can drain 100% of the oil. ALL aluminum pans I've seen are 100% drain capable. A steel pan can have a sump area so that any boss height only affects an insignificant area. Also, the top of the boss can be flush or below the pan floor, so that no oil is retained. All depends on the pan type and design.
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