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Old 02-18-2021, 11:14 AM   #1
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2018 Yukon towing a 26DBH

Hi all, anyone towing a 26DBH with a 2018 Yukon or similar? Max tow is 8100#. Payload is 1600#.

I have the max tow package and plan to pack light. I do plan to go up and down the sierras.

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Old 02-18-2021, 11:34 AM   #2
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Good friends of mine were towing a Rockwood Mini Lite 21DS with a Yukon. They stopped pretty quickly and got a large tow rig. He hated it, added air bags in the rear, the works, and could not make it work right.
I have the trailer you see in my signature, I towed it 4 hours home with a Ram 1500 4x4 Diesel fully prepped with the tow package, and immediately traded it in.
Forget that max tow number, I'm betting you'd not be comfortable with that setup, especially if you have the 5.3 V8. You should really be in the 19' or smaller range, looking at trailers that are 4,000 lbs or lighter. At least that's my opinion.
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Old 02-18-2021, 11:55 AM   #3
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Not the same vehicle, but for what it is worth I just towed ours home with a 2019 F150 with the 5.0 V8 with essentially the max tow package optioned onto the truck. All of the capacities (payload, tongue, tow weight, and GCWR) were 10% or more under max. My tow was mainly on flat ground in the Midwest (Ohio to Illinois) and it towed beautifully. Smooth, no hunting gears, tons of power left. I am using the Husky Centerline WDH hitch.

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Old 02-18-2021, 11:58 AM   #4
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Should also state that my GCWR is 16300 and tow 10900 with a payload of 1780

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Old 02-18-2021, 12:13 PM   #5
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I tow our AW 26DBH with a 2016 GMC Sierra 1500 and I don't think I'd feel comfortable with anything less. My payload is about the same as your Yukon with a Max Tow of 9600#. I have no experience with the terrain or roads in the Sierras but I have made several trips with our rig in Vermont, which I would imagine is somewhat similar, and we did fine on the climbs / descents.
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Old 02-18-2021, 03:32 PM   #6
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We towed a Palomino SolAire7 20RBS (about 25 feet long) with a 2014 Tahoe with Max Tow and the 5.3L and a 6-speed with a 3.42 rear-end. All the numbers were within spec for towing. We towed to New Mexico each year (Ruidoso and Eagle Nest). It was SLOW on the uphill climbs and frequently got hot while climbing. If you plan on crossing Sierra Nevada or the Rockies with your TV, I would get something a whole lot bigger with more "oomph". We currently tow our trailer with a Chevrolet 1500 Silverado Z71 which has a 6.2L and an 8-speed with a 3.23 rear-end. It tows like a dream; plenty of power on the hills, good mileage on the flats, handles easily (better after I got rid of the P-Metric radials and put LT tires on). We are not fully loaded but the tongue weight is in the 700-800# range depending on what is in the trailer. I am at my upper limit with my rig and was probably over my limit with my Tahoe. It tows great on the flats but really drags on the long uphill grades in the mountains. The rig you describe should probably be towed with something in 2500/250 payload/tow capacity range, not with a Tahoe/Suburban or equivalent when driving through mountains. The engine, trailer length and payload limits will get you.
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Old 02-18-2021, 03:56 PM   #7
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I responded to your reply to my post in another thread but will respond here as well so others who may be interested can get the info too. Some more detail on how your Yukon is equipped would be helpful (e.g. engine, z55 Autoride suspension, etc).

We're towing our Alpha Wolf 26DBH-L with either of two (depending on the trip) GMC Yukon XL Denali's. One of them is a 2007 with no modifications (standard 6.2L engine and recently replaced factory air springs and compressor). The other is a 2012, also with recently replaced factory air springs and compressor, but with an upgraded truck cam in the 6.2L engine designed for more power throughout the rev range. We're using a Camco Recurve R3 hitch with the 1000lb. bars. It's been interesting to compare the stock vs modified 6.2L engines in essentially the same trucks, with the truck cam being most noticeable in keeping the RPMs down. Also, the 2012 has the factory brake controller and I added a Tekonsha P3 to the 2007.

The added length of the XL is nice for stability. With the sway control on the hitch engaged, it pulls really well with virtually no sway on the highway. I like to tow at around 65 mph and have no trouble keeping up with traffic, even on the hills. The only time I tend to back off is on some of the bigger mountain slopes in W.VA (6-7% grades), to let the engine relax a little. Even then, keeping 60-65 is easy (<3K RPMs). Both trucks have Tru-Cool 40K transmission coolers in them as well (a must, IMHO). They also keep engine temps down, interestingly.

The tongue weight on my camper is right around 850 lbs. the way I keep it loaded - with nothing in the cargo area of the Denali (3rd row seats also removed) and everything we take with us for the trip is in the camper. That way, I stay just below the payload and rear axle ratings of the truck, and well below the axle ratings of the camper with my wife and 2 small kids in the Yukon.

I have towed all kinds of things (mostly industrial equipment) all over the western US (Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, NoDak) behind GMC/Chevy 3/4 ton and 1 ton trucks, both bumper pulls and goosenecks, and naturally towing with the Yukon is a different experience (softer, a little more wiggle), but I feel safe and confident with the setup we have, and plan to keep rolling with it. About the only modification I'm considering is a better torque converter for the transmissions as it's the only real weak link on the otherwise stout 6L80. Your truck likely has the 10 speed transmission, which is also pretty stout.

Note that I replaced the factory air springs and compressors on both trucks proactively because it's an easy job and the parts were inexpensive through Rock Auto. Both trucks were rolling on their original sets so I did the work proactively. If yours doesn't have the air springs, you'll want to look into a set of aftermarket air springs. If yours has the 5.3 engine, it will pull it, but you'll see higher RPMs and be slower on the hills than you would with a 6.2. Either way, you'll want to upgrade your transmission cooler to the Tru-Cool.

Also, this is the second trailer we've pulled with these trucks - the first was a Springdale 1800BH single axle, and while the Alpha Wolf is 2000 lbs heavier, it seems to tow better and I'm getting the exact same gas mileage of 10 mpg when towing.

Hope this is helpful.
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Old 02-18-2021, 08:35 PM   #8
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In my opinion there's a huge difference between a Yukon XL (Suburban) and a standard Yukon, especially when you compare the strong 6.2 with the weak 5.3. Wheelbase and power and towing all go together well.
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Old 02-18-2021, 09:14 PM   #9
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This is a 5.3L v8. Looking at a 23dbh now, I think the 26 is within limits but the 23 will give us some breathing room. Also, this is a 6 speed tranny.

The 6.2 pretty much only comes with Denali, or RST. It's not a given on the burb or the XL.
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Old 02-19-2021, 10:58 AM   #10
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I just purchased a 26dbh and towed it with my 2014 Yukon. It was the first time towing a TT and I white knuckled it for the first 30 minutes. I followed my GPS on a "quicker" route but didn't realize that it put me on backroads. I went up some steep climbs and down some too. I felt like the Yukon did much better than I imagined. I put a transmission cooler prior to picking up the trailer. The engine temperature gauge moved only slightly past the center during the 45 minute long trip.

The only thing that I did not like about the ride was that the Yukon swayed a lot more than I liked. I'm used to driving a Honda Pilot that is very responsive. The Yukon swayed on turns even though the trailer was perfectly fine behind me. Going up some of the hills was a little challenging. The engine revved up quite a bit just to stay around 35-45 mph. I did not floor the gas pedal so I am not sure how it would react if I gave the engine more fuel. The transmission shifted well so that was not a concern. Going down hill was a breeze thanks to the break controller. I slowed down very well when needed.

I want to point out that this was just me towing an empty trailer. I have no idea how the Yukon is going to perform once we load it up for a trip with a family of 5. I'm interest to hear from anyone with a similar trailer/tow vehicle/family set up.
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Old 02-19-2021, 02:42 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by TTnewbie View Post
I just purchased a 26dbh and towed it with my 2014 Yukon. It was the first time towing a TT and I white knuckled it for the first 30 minutes. I followed my GPS on a "quicker" route but didn't realize that it put me on backroads. I went up some steep climbs and down some too. I felt like the Yukon did much better than I imagined. I put a transmission cooler prior to picking up the trailer. The engine temperature gauge moved only slightly past the center during the 45 minute long trip.

The only thing that I did not like about the ride was that the Yukon swayed a lot more than I liked. I'm used to driving a Honda Pilot that is very responsive. The Yukon swayed on turns even though the trailer was perfectly fine behind me. Going up some of the hills was a little challenging. The engine revved up quite a bit just to stay around 35-45 mph. I did not floor the gas pedal so I am not sure how it would react if I gave the engine more fuel. The transmission shifted well so that was not a concern. Going down hill was a breeze thanks to the break controller. I slowed down very well when needed.

I want to point out that this was just me towing an empty trailer. I have no idea how the Yukon is going to perform once we load it up for a trip with a family of 5. I'm interest to hear from anyone with a similar trailer/tow vehicle/family set up.
Nowhere in your post did you mention whether or not you had a WDH with sway control.
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Old 02-19-2021, 03:38 PM   #12
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Nowhere in your post did you mention whether or not you had a WDH with sway control.
Thanks for pointing that out. We have to compare apples to apples, right?! I do have a WDH. When I said "sway" I was referring to the Yukon itself, not the trailer. The suspension on the Yukon is such that when you make turns you feel the whole vehicle turn in the opposite direction. It's nothing major but just enough to annoy me. This is why I stated that I usually drive a Honda Pilot. In the Polite you make a turn and you don't feel anything. In the Yukon, I'm assuming due to the suspension, you can feel the entire vehicle move during a turn. I've never driven a pick up truck so I can only assume that the Yukon drives like one being that it is based on a pick up chassis.
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Old 02-19-2021, 03:58 PM   #13
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Well, SUVs have much softer suspensions, compared to their truck cousins. Plus most have P-rated tires.
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Old 02-19-2021, 10:24 PM   #14
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How much do the tires play into this? I did notice that when I attached the TT to the WDH my rear tires dropped down a bit. A bit too much for my comfort because the side walls where hanging over the thread portion of the tire. I was afraid that any nail or debris on the rode could puncture the tire wall.
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Old 02-21-2021, 06:49 PM   #15
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Ford has more towing ratings. My F150 is 11600lbs with WDH
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Old 02-21-2021, 09:56 PM   #16
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Ford has more towing ratings. My F150 is 11600lbs with WDH
What does that have to do with the OP's question about the GMC Yukon?
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Old 02-22-2021, 12:54 AM   #17
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If he is using a WDH it raises the weight the truck can pull. He said it has air springs? Or he installed air springs.but should try a WDH set properly. He then says the front of the truck sways not the trailer so I would look at sway bar maybe a link is broken
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Old 02-22-2021, 01:08 AM   #18
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If he is using a WDH it raises the weight the truck can pull. He said it has air springs? Or he installed air springs.but should try a WDH set properly. He then says the front of the truck sways not the trailer so I would look at sway bar maybe a link is broken
It would help if you quoted who you're referring to because it's not the OP, who never claimed any such thing.
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Old 02-22-2021, 06:25 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by captaingeek View Post
Hi all, anyone towing a 26DBH with a 2018 Yukon or similar? Max tow is 8100#. Payload is 1600#.



I have the max tow package and plan to pack light. I do plan to go up and down the sierras.



Regards


I feel like a 5.3 Yukon like this is well suited to pull a trailer with a actual weighed weight of around 5-6k lbs and a weighed tongue weight of 650-750 lbs.

I used to pull a 25 ft rig that weighed in at 5k lbs with 650 lb tongue weight with a 5.3 v8 Tahoe (2007) 3.73 gears. I think this was the 4 speed trans.as well. We made a couple trips down to Tennessee and back and over to Washington and Virginia through some mountain areas. Probably nothing like the sierras though.

That said I often found myself pushing my personal limit on the downhill side to keep some momentum for the uphill side. This actually helped with the cooling as well. Bear in mind that my truck/engine had 250,000 miles on it at this time and not near as new as a 2018 Yukon. I would hope there has been some improvements made to that engine since.

I think the closer you keep your rig to 5000 lbs actual weight (weighed with gear) and around the 650-750 tongue weight, the happier you will be. I was using a Reese round bar wdh with 2 friction sway bars. Worked very well, but the second sway bar made a big difference IMO.
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Old 02-22-2021, 07:37 AM   #20
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If he is using a WDH it raises the weight the truck can pull. He said it has air springs? Or he installed air springs.but should try a WDH set properly. He then says the front of the truck sways not the trailer so I would look at sway bar maybe a link is broken
I would say if he does have a WDH and it is his first time towing, hopefully it was set up by, well, let’s say a professional or someone with experience setting them up. I think your first time should be done by someone very knowledgeable because as we know, if you do not get it done properly it will not work as designed totally.

That said, just picked up my TT which is a 26DBH also. I had my Recurve 6 WDH set up by dealer mechanic who does it on a weekly basis. He explained everything to me and how it functions. That said, not the same vehicle you have, but the Super Duty 250 performed well towing it home. I did not have time to set up the trailer configuration at the dealer prior to leaving that Ford has built in tot the towing computer but I read where if you have the anti-sway activated on the WDH to not activate your vehicles anti-sway as it will adversely sometimes affect towing.

Who knows.....but now I have it home I will get the trucks computer set up for this TT.

To the OP, the WHD in theory and I guess the physics of it places the trailers force direct center and to the front axle somehow so as to not overweight the rear of the tow vehicle < I read so much on this and this was repeated a few times.

It is suppose to keep the tow vehicle very stable even on vehicles that have way over the rated capacity for the particular trailer you are towing. I don’t know as I am no engineer, well, I started college as a mechanical engineer but eventually changed majors. So I do understand some of the rationale.

I would look to your tow vehicles numbers in total and the trailers numbers then crunch those and get a WDH if you don’t have one to have a better setup. I have seen people tow without them and for a lifetime. I do believe it is money well spent to get even a bit of extra ability and safety from it.
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