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Old 03-19-2020, 06:57 PM   #21
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And if you have all this stuff, you can make your own bread instead of raiding the grocery stores for it. This is a perfect opportunity for parents to teach their kids how to be self-sufficient and useful. I know kids who have no clue what to do with a potato peeler. Sadly, a lot of parents don't either. Hardship teaches values you can't get by playing video games and waiting for mom & dad to "bring home the bacon". I think a lot of kids might be finding that out soon.
how do you make bread?? I had a bread machine one time and what it made tasted like crap. I threw it all out machine as well
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Old 03-19-2020, 07:00 PM   #22
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Excuse me Dr. Oz
For some of us, starvation takes first place over diet.
At least yous whole grains.
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Old 03-19-2020, 08:39 PM   #23
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Sheltering at home with the time

Sheltering-in-place should be a time-out to reflect for all of us on what is important. For way too long many think nothing can bring us to our knees because we are above it all with Wall Street money and anything goes. We all better realize getting ahead by being greedy, lies and mistruths is just plain wrong. We need honest leadership from all our elective officials. Playing down and lying about what is occurring in other countries has cost us 6 weeks of getting ready for what we need to fight the corvid-19 virus. The real heroes are the unselfish doctors and nurses who are putting their lives on the line, getting sick themselves to take care of the sick. It sure isn't the "hero" who puts a ball in a basket.
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Old 03-19-2020, 09:15 PM   #24
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how do you make bread?? I had a bread machine one time and what it made tasted like crap. I threw it all out machine as well
Here are some good recipes to get you started. They even have a hot line number you can call if you have a question : https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/bread?
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Old 03-19-2020, 10:34 PM   #25
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Some interesting facts and myths about wheat stuff. “Wheat Belly”

https://www.amazon.com/Wheat-Belly-L...4798/ref=nodl_

I personally prefer a seafood diet...if I see food I eat it. If it’s labeled healthy, low fat, low carb, gluten free, low calorie etc etc etc I put it back on the shelf. Funny thing about that is at 76 years old I don’t take any prescription or OTC drugs. My weight has been 170 +- five pounds since I left Parris Island.

Maybe I won’t live as long as others, but I’ll slide into the grave like a runner sliding into home plate saying “That was one helluva ride, y’all“
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Old 03-19-2020, 11:41 PM   #26
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Now the CA flamboyant governor says the state will 50% infection rate in 8 weeks. So it’s going to be worse than China. I think he just wants his name in the news.
As for bread or any food some people have a different reaction than others. Like coronary artery disease.
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Old 03-20-2020, 09:12 PM   #27
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I've been surprised that no authority is advocating people (especially seniors) take up / expand yoga.

That way, should the time come, you'll be limber enough to put your head between your legs and, kiss your ess goodbye.....
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Old 03-20-2020, 09:41 PM   #28
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[QUOTE=TitanMike;2290117]I guess I didn't get the e-mail.


I eat whole grain cereals, make bread from all kinds of flour, including whole grain flours. I enjoy it but I don't sit down and eat half a loaf in a single sitting. I also don't slather it with half a tub of butter.

/QUOTE]

If you are using "tub butter" if probably is bad for you.
Having been a dairyman over half of my life and enjoyed the fruits of my labors
I can say my cholesterols are very good and no other problems I would contribute to dairy products.

It's when I started living the sedate life of a truck driver that my blood pressure rose, but that is under control now. I don't think my health is all that bad for being able to see "80" from across the fence!

Hunker down Mr Mike, keep away from those mean virus's!
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Old 03-21-2020, 01:03 AM   #29
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8 days. I'm going nuts but hanging in there.
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Old 03-23-2020, 10:27 PM   #30
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8 days. I'm going nuts but hanging in there.
"Things turn out best for the people who make the best of how things turn out!" For example, the DW and I have been housebound all month due to nasty head colds and a desire to avoid other people, so we piled into the '08 Colorado and headed for a Sunday drive on a few back roads in SW Utah yesterday. Got to end of one and took a stroll in the clean fresh air. Came home without infecting anyone or being infected by anyone. Cabin fever cured for a couple of gallons of cheap gas.
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:14 AM   #31
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I guess I didn't get the e-mail.

I've been eating bread all my life and I'm approaching 80 years. No Diabetes, have a nice healthy weight that doesn't test the limits of the ladder on the back of my trailer, and my only real "ailment" (Coronary Artery Disease) was a "gift" from my dad who died when I was 19 at age 58.

Thing about bread, like everything else it has to be consumed in moderation.

I eat whole grain cereals, make bread from all kinds of flour, including whole grain flours. I enjoy it but I don't sit down and eat half a loaf in a single sitting. I also don't slather it with half a tub of butter.

I also practice the same "moderation" with meats, sweets, and all the other things people try to convince me are un-healthy.
Yep you can live a long time in a cave eating lettuce and spinach ?? Life is best enjoyed doing it all in moderation.
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:56 AM   #32
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8 days. I'm going nuts but hanging in there.
I am enjoying my time at home but I live in a very rural area thats wooded and go hang out in my pole barn daily. Turn on the stereo out there and am doing some work and spend quality time with my outside cat ( she likes to snuggle ). For other entertainment I can take a walk in he woods or just down the road, mother nature provides me with the characters in play given the scenario which changes constantly. Some people travel to get away from the cities in which they reside but I travel to explore other areas. Putting life in a proper perspective works wonders with ones outlook on any given situation. Live life like there is no tomorrow but plan on tomorrow to keep one foot moving forward rather than stagnating or regressing. Life is full of wonders and joys as long as I open my mind and am appreciative with what is at hand.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:58 AM   #33
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I hear you neighbor. When it hit I thought, YOU HAVE GOT TO BE KIDDING ME. And then the aftershocks are doing nothing for the nerves. Just think about opening a shaken bottle of pop, slow release is better. Aren't we lucky to have an RV. I want to pull ours out to the street, fill it up, and use as a emergency shelter.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:06 PM   #34
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This is not to suggest you are feeling sorry for yourself.
When *I* might feel sorry for myself or fearful of my condition, I remember my family before me.
Mom and Dad were children during the Depression. The real one. Dad’s mother died when he was eleven, right in the middle of it. For the rest of her life my mother would scrape the wrappers butter came in and save bacon grease, swish water in every can food came in to get the residue, and neither would hesitate to pick up pennies found in the street. Mom made clothing, even the bag she carried her clothes pins in. I still have it. Our clothes dryer shone above us every day. Dad never wasted a moment he could use to make life better.
Dad worked like a dog after WWII, taking risks and doing things that, when I learned of them from him late in his life, still have me shaking my head. He got an education and certification in a field he loved, building on it for a successful life.
Dad and Mom were both U.S. Navy vets in WWII. Dad flew torpedo bombers off “aircraft carriers” the size of matchbooks, sinking German submarines in the North Atlantic. If they could not get back to the carrier, they died.
His brother was an Army pilot, shot down while dropping paratroops during the battle of “A Bridge Too Far.”
Dad watched some of his WWII-vet friends go to Korea. I remember that he feared greatly for Mom and us children if he were to be called back.
Mom was a Navy Lieutenant RN in a Navy hospital, caring for wounded sailors and Marines. No one was sent to that hospital unless they were in grave circumstances. Most of her stories were of the incredible spirit of those she tended.
One of her sisters died of diphtheria, another simply disappeared. Her oldest sibling, a brother, didn’t survive his first year of life. Her next older brother served in the Army in Europe against the Germans. Her father was a Merchant Marine captain during WWII, surviving the runs to Murmansk and Archangel.
In my ancestral Norway, not one relative who was alive during the war was untouched. Many died. What many of them endured and did to survive is the stuff of legends.
My paternal grandfather was a U.S. Army veteran of WWI. His grandfather was a Union soldier in the 1860s War of The Great Rebellion. I have his rifle, complete with bayonette and notches.
All of my relatives who were alive in 1918 and who survived the flu, had stories to tell. I’ve visited a cemetery where some were buried.
My parents fearfully watched my brother and me during the polio outbreak of the 1950s. They saw me in hospital for pneumonia before I was one year old. We were quarantined when I got scarlet fever. They saw us both get mumps, measles, German measles (is that racist?) and chicken pox, diseases which killed children all over the world. Hundreds of people in the U.S. died every year from measles.
Earthquakes? I attended the University of Costa Rica a few years after Volcán Irazú blew its top, spewing ash and pyroclastic death on the country. Earthquakes were a daily occurrence. I don’t recall any Ticos lamenting their condition. They laughed as they ran out of buildings during temblors.
My parents saw my brother die at age 27, and saw me go to Viet Nam. As a combat vet, my father knew what I was facing as a USAF combat pilot in Viet Nam.
They lived well into their 80s, dying at peace. As it has been for many others, my own life has had bad times, but the history of my family stands as an example of perseverance and the surety that life can prevail under the worst of circumstances.
No toilet paper? Somehow, I’ll manage.

[Post script: I didn’t really intend this to sound like a rant, though I fear it does. We all suffer pain in our lives and it can affect us all the same. All I really intend to say is that we, Americans, residents of Earth, are the result of our forebears prevailing in the face of adversity. As I see it, we owe no less to them, ourselves, and our children.]
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:37 PM   #35
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I've been reading this thread as it builds. First, I've been in earthquakes in Alaska. Not real fun. I've also been keeping up with the news. This Covid19 is real, it's different, we need to build the herd immunity to it as fast as possible. (I know, but look up herd immunity.)

However, please think about how we can help the homeless, not just those on the street, but those who have suffered a total loss from a windstorm, fire, flood etc. What home do they have to "shelter in place" in? Nature does not stop tossing our best laid plans aside.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:11 PM   #36
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...
[Post script:... All I really intend to say is that we, Americans, residents of Earth, are the result of our forebears prevailing in the face of adversity. As I see it, we owe no less to them, ourselves, and our children.]
This is so true. The ONLY reason WE are here today is because our direct ancestors survived wars, epidemics, pandemics, plagues, pirates and saber tooth tigers (while telling stories around the campfire) long enough to give birth to the next generation. And then make sure they too survive to adulthood. I've done my part as I am sure you all have, too. We are all stronger for it and as a species will continue.
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