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Old 03-21-2018, 08:21 AM   #1
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Tire 235 85/16 vs 235 80/16

I am thinking of replacing my 235 80/16 tires with 235 85/16. My reason is a slight (`400 lbs) increase in max load per tire. The 85's have a one inch increase in diameter (1/2 inch radius) so I do not see any negative effects. There is a slight increase in price but I believe the added max load is worth the extra cost.

Does anyone have experience in going to 85 vs 80 tires?

I have a 2017 Sierra 378 FB.
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Old 03-21-2018, 08:41 AM   #2
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You would be better off going up in load rating than in size, assuming that both tires were of the same load rating just different specs. If going up in load rating, make sure your rims can handle the pressure.
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Old 03-21-2018, 08:57 AM   #3
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Looking at Goodyear endurance and they only come in Load range e.
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Old 03-21-2018, 09:22 AM   #4
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I replaced my Chinese ST 235 80/16 E to Michelin RIB LT 235 85/16 E back in 2006 on my 5th wheel. I've pulled thousands of miles with no negatives to report. I've replaced the RIBs due to age but not mileage or other effects (most of the tread-depth remained). As long as you have the physical spacing between axles to handle the increased diameter and the tires meet the weight requirements, I'd go for it. By the way, the tire weight of the RIBs is significantly heavier than the Chinese OEM tires. Inflation is the same for either,80 psi.
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Old 03-21-2018, 09:26 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptylerp View Post
I am thinking of replacing my 235 80/16 tires with 235 85/16. My reason is a slight (`400 lbs) increase in max load per tire. The 85's have a one inch increase in diameter (1/2 inch radius) so I do not see any negative effects. There is a slight increase in price but I believe the added max load is worth the extra cost.

Does anyone have experience in going to 85 vs 80 tires?

I have a 2017 Sierra 378 FB.
You should measure the rolling tire clearance between the frame, sidewall and between both tires to insure proper fit. Also make sure that the rim will except the tire profile. The tire dealer should be able to provide these dimension to you.

On one of my previous campers I switched out the ST Power King tires, ST235/80R/16 to a Michelin XPS RIBS, LT245/75R/16E. The tires had a slightly different rolling radius and I made several measurements before buying the new tires to insure clearance and fit. They worked very will along with a higher load rating than the pervious Power Kings that came with the trailer.
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Old 03-21-2018, 01:36 PM   #6
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Here's some recent research I did on this subject. Note that you can run the popular Sailun 235/80/16 at 80psi and they are Load Range E with 3,480 lbs carry capacity. If your wheels are rated for 110psi, you can run the same tire at 110psi and they are Load Range G with 4,080 lbs. carry capacity. I currently run the Maxxis and have had good experience with them. I'm on my second set of Maxxis simply because I wanted to change them early (@12,000 miles) before I head to Alaska.
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:37 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim34RL View Post
You should measure the rolling tire clearance between the frame, sidewall and between both tires to insure proper fit. Also make sure that the rim will except the tire profile. The tire dealer should be able to provide these dimension to you.

On one of my previous campers I switched out the ST Power King tires, ST235/80R/16 to a Michelin XPS RIBS, LT245/75R/16E. The tires had a slightly different rolling radius and I made several measurements before buying the new tires to insure clearance and fit. They worked very will along with a higher load rating than the pervious Power Kings that came with the trailer.
Notes and references for future endeavors:

1: All LT245/75R16E sized tires have a minimum rim width requirement of 6.5".

2: https://www.michelinman.com/US/en/he...res.html#tab-4
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wlstroud View Post
I replaced my Chinese ST 235 80/16 E to Michelin RIB LT 235 85/16 E back in 2006 on my 5th wheel. I've pulled thousands of miles with no negatives to report. I've replaced the RIBs due to age but not mileage or other effects (most of the tread-depth remained). As long as you have the physical spacing between axles to handle the increased diameter and the tires meet the weight requirements, I'd go for it. By the way, the tire weight of the RIBs is significantly heavier than the Chinese OEM tires. Inflation is the same for either,80 psi.
Michelin considers that a misapplication of their tire. The reference points out why.

https://www.michelinman.com/US/en/he...res.html#tab-4

Note: The Michelin XPS Ribs are retreadable.
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Old 03-21-2018, 03:44 PM   #9
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Switch to bigger tire 80 vs 85

I did that last year. Was the best thing I ever did. Gave piece of mind due to more load carrying capacity. No problem with heat buildup. Rode great and pulled great. Little bigger diameter did not make any difference on clearance.
So if clearance is not a problem, my advice is to go for it.
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Old 03-21-2018, 05:23 PM   #10
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I replaced my Rainier ST 235 80/16 E after pulling 43 miles with Sailun 235/85/16. All fit and pull great! Actually, the 85 were only 4 months old and $10 less the 80 each.
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Old 03-22-2018, 09:05 AM   #11
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As long as you don't have any clearance issues, makes little difference as to size of tire as long as they are all the same. Load range increase is always a good thing. I found that when I bought my Michelin XPS's that 225 75 16's had a load rating around 2800 pounds, but the 245 75 16's had a load rating of 3000. Big difference in the same tire. You need to have an unobstructed travel for the tires over the whole range of suspension travel. Just be sure to buy top quality tires, not China bombs. They're cheap, but will cost you more in the long run.
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Old 03-22-2018, 09:23 AM   #12
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An old tire man told me that if you have 2 tires of the same size withe the same tread depth and weigh them and one is heavier; the extra weight is due to more material in the body, (cord ply material).
Which tire should carry the loaad.better?
For what it is worth.
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:09 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptylerp View Post
I am thinking of replacing my 235 80/16 tires with 235 85/16. My reason is a slight (`400 lbs) increase in max load per tire. The 85's have a one inch increase in diameter (1/2 inch radius) so I do not see any negative effects. There is a slight increase in price but I believe the added max load is worth the extra cost.

Does anyone have experience in going to 85 vs 80 tires?

I have a 2017 Sierra 378 FB.
I went to the 235 85/16. Size didn't affect it. I also went with Hercules STR tires.
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:20 AM   #14
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Same width, slightly taller
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Old 08-18-2018, 02:07 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry pw View Post
An old tire man told me that if you have 2 tires of the same size withe the same tread depth and weigh them and one is heavier; the extra weight is due to more material in the body, (cord ply material).
Which tire should carry the loaad.better?
For what it is worth.
Not enough info to determine the tire strength.

Tire weight from durability factors does not add to a tire's strength.
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Old 08-18-2018, 05:39 PM   #16
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Exactly that from OEM to Sailun
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Old 08-18-2018, 05:48 PM   #17
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Compare the tire weights, current vs. New. If your 85s will be significantly heavier, make sure your wheels can handle the increase. This also applies if you are going from 80's @ 80psi to 85's running @ 110psi. I've seen a couple of rare instances where the heavier tires cracked their HiSpec aluminum wheels. Of course this is all moot if your doing new wheels too.
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Old 08-27-2018, 09:42 AM   #18
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one thing about increasing the tire weight capability, I didn't read anyone mentioning axle limits. My 356RL Sierra gross is 14,000 and I believe my axles are 7,000 - I believe.. So getting tires that could handle more weight would only be to have that feel good feeling my tires wouldn't/shouldn't be a reason for failure. I have something called Akuret HF188 ST235/80R16, 2012, and I'm afraid to move it 4 miles from parking to a park site, much less drive it to a tire dealer. But I want to go to Goodyear Endurance. Seems to be available from many places and could get one readily.
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Old 08-27-2018, 11:56 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by semlohde View Post
one thing about increasing the tire weight capability, I didn't read anyone mentioning axle limits. My 356RL Sierra gross is 14,000 and I believe my axles are 7,000 - I believe.. So getting tires that could handle more weight would only be to have that feel good feeling my tires wouldn't/shouldn't be a reason for failure. I have something called Akuret HF188 ST235/80R16, 2012, and I'm afraid to move it 4 miles from parking to a park site, much less drive it to a tire dealer. But I want to go to Goodyear Endurance. Seems to be available from many places and could get one readily.
The official load capacity for your axles will be found on the trailer's certification label. That's the value the vehicle manufacturer uses to determine the size and load capacity for the Original Equipment tires.

Your current tires have a load capacity of 3520# @ 80 PSI , verified from the manufacturer's specs. The GY Endurance, same size is rated at 3420# @ 80 PSI. It's a "catch-22" and is applicable when the vehicle manufacturer actually documents the use of the 3520# tires.
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Old 11-22-2018, 12:12 AM   #20
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I went with the taller tires on my 372LOK. I did it for height although 1/2Ē isnít much. I went with Sailuns.
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