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Old 03-10-2020, 10:52 AM   #1
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Wheel well tire blow out protector

All the talk of tire blowouts and damage it could or will cause to the trailer has led me to think about installing so type of protection to the top, front & back of the wheel well.
I have opened the area below the sink in my TT and have found very little protection for the kitchen area of the trailer if there is tire blow out. The slide out is over the other tire wheel. What kind of damage would the TT experience if a blow out happens under the slide out.
QUESTION; Would the members have any suggestions or aftermarket products that I could install in the wheel wells of out TT to protect the area from damage caused by a blown tire.

Thanks in advance,
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Old 03-10-2020, 11:00 AM   #2
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I guess that you could use plate metal but......... In 35 years of pulling campers and box trailers I have never had a blow out.

Can and does it happen - Yes .....often - No.


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Old 03-10-2020, 11:15 AM   #3
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Rather than "up-armoring" your wheel wells it might be better to just up your game on tire maintenance and failure prevention.

Regular tire inspection for early signs of upcoming failure like bulges, cracks, or strange wear patterns.

Invest in a TPMS system so you get an early warning of a tire going flat while driving. You may have checked the air before you started driving but what about that nail or other piece of road junk you might have driven over? Trailers are especially vulnerable to picking up sharp objects as the tow vehicle often passes over the item lying flat on the road then kicks it up in the air where the trailer tires encounter it while it's more upright and able to puncture the tire. This is often why people see rear tires going flat due to nails, etc, than front tires.

The only reason that tires tear up the bottom of trailers is that the tire overheated due to low tire pressure and came apart at speed. Best investment would really be a TPMS system rather than adding "armor". Anything capable of truly preventing damage would definitely add some weight and if not installed properly could even add to the damage from a disintegrating tire. When a chunk of flapping tire tread catches an edge then the "armor" could be torn loose and cause even bigger problems.
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Old 03-10-2020, 11:23 AM   #4
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I had a failed tire take out several 2x12 planks covered with diamond decking on a flat bed trailer.
I had a blowout at 70mph that did over $8000 worth of damage to my fifth wheel. It took out the floor, wiring, pex lines, the skirting, the steps, one cubby and door, the front door, and the awning. So I think a huge, heavy, wheel well liner would have helped a little, but not much.
I've seen lots of discussions on this subject over the years, but have never seen a good solution.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:12 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Florida.Traveler View Post
QUESTION; Would the members have any suggestions or aftermarket products that I could install in the wheel wells of out TT to protect the area from damage caused by a blown tire.
I don't think anything would protect the tt from damage from a blown out tire.

When we had a tt and on our current rv, we routinely inspect the tires whenever we stop, check the tire pressure in the morning before we start traveling and replace them at recommended intervals. Also, be aware of the speed rating of your tires and do not overload one side of the rv.
Tire Pressure Monitor Systems are good, but are not a 100% protection. Our friends had the tread separate with a 'bang' but the TPMS didn't go off because the core never lost pressure.

Unfortunately, no good solution.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:23 PM   #6
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EVER WATCH A nascar RACE?
YOUR NOT STOPPING THE SPINNING RUBBER. INVEST YOUR PROTECTOR MONIES INTO A TIRE PRESSURE MONITORING SYSTEM WHICH WILL ALERT YOU ON TIRE TEMPS AND SUDDEN LOSS OF TIRE PRESSURE SO YOU CAN PULL TO THE SIDE LONG BEFORE YOU SEE TIRE CHUNKS ON THE HIGHWAY BEHIND YOU.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:24 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Reverse_snowbird View Post
I don't think anything would protect the tt from damage from a blown out tire.

When we had a tt and on our current rv, we routinely inspect the tires whenever we stop, check the tire pressure in the morning before we start traveling and replace them at recommended intervals. Also, be aware of the speed rating of your tires and do not overload one side of the rv.
Tire Pressure Monitor Systems are good, but are not a 100% protection. Our friends had the tread separate with a 'bang' but the TPMS didn't go off because the core never lost pressure.

Unfortunately, no good solution.
No, they aren't a 100% protection but the do save people from damage more times than not. Since a lot of tire failures are caused by air loss well before the tire fails, that's where a TPMS comes in very handy.

As for tire failures due to separations, that's where a physical inspection is necessary. Separations rarely occur immediately. They've been developing long before they actually give way. Lifting the tire off the ground periodically and roatating it with no weight on it will reveal most developing separations when the uneven bump starts to show up. If a separation starts to form on the vehicle you are riding in you feel it in your butt or steering wheel. The trailer is all on it's own so you don't get the same warning.

No, a TPMS isn't the panacea for all tire failures but it IS a great tool to prevent the most destructive.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:29 PM   #8
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No, a TPMS isn't the panacea for all tire failures but it IS a great tool to prevent the most destructive.
Not trying to start an argument.

Just trying to point out that you have to be vigilant with tires and not rely totally on a piece of electronics.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:30 PM   #9
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I have a 2013 Windjammer by Rockwood. I have had 6 blown tires. I was blaming the tires but after my last blow out, it was evident that the clearance from the top of the tires to the bottom of the trailer deck was less than 1'. The last blow out caused significant damage to the underside of the trailer. I called Forest River & Keystone but they were no help at all. The trailer is unsafe to tow. For this reason I am having the axel and tires replaced. If anyone hasn't had similar issues please post a reply
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:33 PM   #10
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What kind of springs do you have? Our leaf springs on our tt made tire clearance a problem and had to be replaced. I'm assuming your tt is not overloaded.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:44 PM   #11
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Wheel well tire blow out protector

The sticker on the unit says that I have an independent Rubber suspension axles. There are no springs. The trailer was not overloaded. I have had several trailer experts look at it and all agree that the axle and tires are not strong enough for the trailer to be towed safely.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:54 PM   #12
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Wheel well inforcementi

I would invest in the best tires available, then install tpm , both give me peace of mind and a constant check on tire pressure.
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:59 PM   #13
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WhEEL WELL TIRE BLOW OUT PROTECTOR

I am beefing up the tires and rims. I am also replacing the axle with a heavier one. Because of the clearance issue it makes no sense to just get heavier duty tires.
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Old 03-10-2020, 01:19 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Reverse_snowbird View Post
Not trying to start an argument.

Just trying to point out that you have to be vigilant with tires and not rely totally on a piece of electronics.
My point exactly. But a TPMS can be part of that "vigilance". Neat thing about it is that it watches your tires while you''re driving.


FWIW, I spend 95% of my working life in the tire and tire related business. The largest single cause of tire failures is heat caused by tires being run with too little tire pressure. Some from people failing to check pressures regularly and some from not being alerted in time when the tire has picked up a puncturing object. Tire failures due to actual manufacturing defect are a small percentage of the total and running at too high a speed or overloaded certainly have their share of the pie. A TPMS can certainly help give warning in the latter to cases as a pressure/temperature build up will be noted.

It's all about the "warning" and then it's up to the operator to take appropriate action. All part of a system with no one single part responsible for the prevention of failure and resulting damage.


PS, I see this as a discussion, not argument.
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Old 03-10-2020, 01:45 PM   #15
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I'm with the TPMS crowd, and also believe in buying the best tires I can find to do the job. It goes with the territory that maintenance is number one. Check pressures regularly, watch for signs of sidewall cracking, pay attention to any out of round situation, (a sure sign of tread separation), watch for excessive or uneven tread wear. My rule, when in doubt, check it out. I don't want damage to my Fifth wheel of course, but I also don't want to change a tire on the side of a highway where the cars are going by at 70 to 80 mph. Just not my idea of fun for obvious reasons.
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Old 03-10-2020, 02:03 PM   #16
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OK.....

Did everyone miss that I said TPMS are good? I don't think that brands me as 'anti TPMS'.

I also said that "we routinely inspect the tires whenever we stop, check the tire pressure in the morning before we start traveling and replace them at recommended intervals. Also, be aware of the speed rating of your tires and do not overload one side of the rv. "
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Old 03-10-2020, 02:27 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Oaklevel View Post
I guess that you could use plate metal but......... In 35 years of pulling campers and box trailers I have never had a blow out.

Can and does it happen - Yes .....often - No.


That's good for you. I had three in one trip. One, which I replaced right away, then two more within ten miles of each other while I limped to a tire company to replace all of them.
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Old 03-10-2020, 05:53 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by NMWildcat View Post
I had a failed tire take out several 2x12 planks covered with diamond decking on a flat bed trailer.
I had a blowout at 70mph that did over $8000 worth of damage to my fifth wheel. It took out the floor, wiring, pex lines, the skirting, the steps, one cubby and door, the front door, and the awning. So I think a huge, heavy, wheel well liner would have helped a little, but not much.
I've seen lots of discussions on this subject over the years, but have never seen a good solution.
Were you over the rated speed of the tire, overloaded, 110 degrees of ambient temperature? I had a blowout on the Sanibel, PSI @ 80#, traveling 60mph, $3500. worth of damage. Good Year factory installed, 18 months old.
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Old 03-10-2020, 06:05 PM   #19
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Were you over the rated speed of the tire, overloaded, 110 degrees of ambient temperature? I had a blowout on the Sanibel, PSI @ 80#, traveling 60mph, $3500. worth of damage. Good Year factory installed, 18 months old.
Why would any of that matter? A failure is a failure, and will result in damage. Ways to mitigate the resulting damage is what we are discussing.
It would be great if all you had to do was follow the rules to prevent all tire failures, but it doesn't work that way.
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Old 03-10-2020, 07:31 PM   #20
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I was in tractor supply the other day and noticed utility trailer fenders . I was trying to figure out if they could be modified to fit inside tt wheel well opening ?
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