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Old 12-06-2023, 03:08 PM   #1
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Just Ordered e pro

Just ordered a 2024 e pro 20 BHS with power package.
Coming from a Winnebago class B.
Trying to get ready for it.
Towing with a 10 y/o Tahoe.
Plan on getting a WD hitch 400 to 600 tongue weight rating ( suggestions appreciated)
A backup camera ( trailer has furion mount & wiring) thinking halo view ?
Leveling blocks , wheel chocks .
Have sewer hose , water filter, chairs, grill , cooking equipment from previous rv.
Any other needs you recommend will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
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Old 12-06-2023, 04:50 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LostArrow3 View Post
Just ordered a 2024 e pro 20 BHS with power package.
Coming from a Winnebago class B.
Trying to get ready for it.
Towing with a 10 y/o Tahoe.
Plan on getting a WD hitch 400 to 600 tongue weight rating ( suggestions appreciated)
A backup camera ( trailer has furion mount & wiring) thinking halo view ?
Leveling blocks , wheel chocks .
Have sewer hose , water filter, chairs, grill , cooking equipment from previous rv.
Any other needs you recommend will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
You should check the Yellow Door Jamb sticker on your Tahoe to determine the PAYLOAD Capacity of your Tahoe. Payload INCLUDES all passengers, all gear, WDHitch, AND TONGUE Weight of the E-PRO. PAYLOAD Capacity is THE LIMITING factor in any Weight discussion..

The TONGUE Weight of your E-Pro will be between 600-700 lbs when it is loaded. The advertised Hitch (Tongue) Wt, 491 lbs is FICTIONAL, , and is only applicable to an empty TT with NO ADD-ONs (Power Package), Accessories, Battery, LP gas, water, food, clothing or equipment in the TT. You WILL need a heavier duty WDH with a MINIMUM capacity of 700 lbs. This MAY EXCEED the Hitch capacity of your Tahoe.

I HIGHLY suggest a HALOVIEW Rear View Camera, after extensive research I think it is the best product line. I have a Monitor that is shaped like the OEM Vehicle Rear View Mirror, and straps to it, so you look where you are used to looking for a rear view. It also comes with an adapter for a direct use (or replacement) of the Furrion mount.
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Old 12-07-2023, 11:22 AM   #3
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The Andersen WDH has worked well for us towing our 20BHS with a Ford Ranger.
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Old 12-07-2023, 01:31 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by kipkohl View Post
The Andersen WDH has worked well for us towing our 20BHS with a Ford Ranger.
I agree 100% It is easy to attach, and easy to adjust, with NO HEAVY BARS to contend with. It is also lighter than most other WDHs so it helps when you have limited Payload Capacity. It also provides SWAY protection
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Old 12-07-2023, 02:44 PM   #5
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Important heads up on using the Anderson WDH hitch.

As much of a fan as I am of the product, potential owners should take a gander at the frame damage issue, discussed here, and take note of the suggested ways to mitigate/address (namely, fish plates and/or weld in place).

Particularly important for those at the upper end of the weight limit for the Anderson, as correcting increased tongue weight puts more force into the trailer frame.

Just my .02, hope this helps.
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Old 12-07-2023, 05:47 PM   #6
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Your E Pro (Geo Pro) is a single axle rig.
Data I used for comments: https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/flags...ro/E20BHS/7993

My comments are geared to someone whose experience is with a Class B...not a travel trailer. Setup and towing are very different.

Spend some time at a local CAT scale to get accurate measurments of tongue weight (ready to travel) and Gross Vehicle Weight (also ready to travel).
The single axle configuration presents challenges and opportunities for loading to put you in control of tongue weight. The same things can be done with a two-axle rig, but these tactics apply especially well with a single axle rig.

The axle on single axle rigs TENDS to be a bit rearward of where dual axles are placed...biasing toward heavier tongue weight. Add to that the large passthrough storage well forward and the ability to just toss stuff on the bed, and your rig can get tongue heavy in a hurry.

Also note that your battery (~60#) and the propane in what appear to be two 20# tanks (~40# total) is not included in the dry tongue weight. So you start with almost 600# on the tongue with no other loading.

Also note that your CCC (cargo carrying capacity) of 839# is reduced by that 100# of battery and propane. Your hot water heater (which is also well forward) will retain 6 gallons of water at 8.3#/gallon for another 50# bite out of your CCC. Fill your freshwater tank (31 gallons typically minus the 6 gallons in the hot water heater), and that's another 207 pounds of CCC taken away. If you boondock, you get to carry less than 500# of stuff.

Back to tongue weight. The design of this rig fosters having LOTS of weight far forward. By spending time at the CAT scale, you can fiddle fart around with your loading configuration to BALANCE the load fore and aft of the axle to achieve something close to the ideal tongue weight of your 4491# GVWR (UVW + CCC = GVWR) of about 12% = 539#.

Note that this tongue weight is LESS than the dry tongue weight plus the weight of the battery, two full propane tanks, and a full hot water heater!!!
You have your work cut out for you. Your tongue weight can be heavier...quite a bit heavier...assuming your Tahoe can handle it, but I doubt the 10 year old Tahoe has enough payload capacity to handle 1000# of tongue weight, the 60# WDH, and all the stuff you'll be carrying in the Tahoe including humans.

When doing your fiddle farting around with load adjustments, bear in mind that if you remove 1# from the front of the rig and move it to the rear...say in the shower...the effect will be an almost 2# shift by moving 1# front to back. With the rearward axle bias, the actual net change will be more like 1.5 to 1.75 pounds, but you get the idea.

You need too learn how to load this thing...and take notes so you can repeat the process over and over again.

As for options and accessories. I happen to LOVE ramp style side-to-side levelers. And with a single axle rig, you're in luck. You can easily use the best...the Anderson Leveler. It makes a nice cradle to hold that downhill tire somewhat securely. Leveling blocks work, but they take a lot of guesswork, and they aren't particularly good to hold wheel chocks. The Anderson is a bit better.

I added a 12" x 24" x 3/4" sheet of plywood and a similar sized strip of tractor trailer mud flap to protect the Anderson from the ground and give the Anderson excellent traction on the wood. Works great. And, if you need more lift, you could use your leveling blocks or 2" x 6" lumber (heavy).

And to make it VERY easy to know when your level, I love the Hopkins bubble levels, because they have a straight edge on the bottom making true level installation VERY easy without having to perfectly level the rig first. Using the Anderson style levelers, my wife monitors the Hopkins. As I ramp upward on the Anderson, she tells me to stop when level side-to-side, then she places the wedge under the Anderson, and we're done.

BEAR IN MIND that it's very difficult to securely chock the lifted downhill tire. You want that Anderson to CRADLE the downhill tire enough that the tire won't fall off the lift.

Also, with that in mind, on SIDEHILLS, your tongue jack needs to be VERY secure from movement. The most secure method (in my experience) is to carve out a flat/level spot in the ground, use a wheel dock to hold a drop leg from the tongue jack. For good measure, I like to drive a "giant nail" style tent spike down the center of the wheel dock to prevent sliding (remove the plastic clip on the nail for this job). The tongue jack and uphill wheel chocks are the only things preventing the rig from twisting off the Anderson leveler...that and that little bit of cradling. So that tongue jack connection with the earth is very important.

If unhitching on a side hill, ALWAYS be on the uphill side in case something goes wrong. Ask me how I know.

Next come the stabilizer jacks. These are NOT leveling jacks. They are meant to take some of the bounce out of the rig while occupied. ALWAYS start with the DOWNHILL REAR stab jack. Take a good strain...maybe lift the rig about 1" or so...but not much. THIS APPLIES ADDITIONAL DOWN PRESSURE ON THE TONGUE JACK. Next do the uphill rear tongue jack. Also about 1" of lift. Then do the uphill and downhill FRONT stab jacks...just snug. NO LIFT, or you UNLOAD the tongue jack's connection to the ground.

From my POV, the accessories list is far less important than weight and balance and how to safely level and secure this rig. It's all VERY different from life with a Class B.

PS, this rig is a boondocking delight...not an RV park queen. Nothing wrong with RV parks, but if you boondock, you're gonna need a generator. A 2 KW generator wet (fuel and oil) will weigh in around 70#. Add a 1 gallon can of extra fuel (gas is 6.6#/gallon) and with the fuel can, you're flirting with 10#. So, out of your <500# of available cargo capacity, you just ate another 80#.

PPS, Your rig has 200 watts of solar. Learn how to best use it. When boondocking, do NOT use that inverter to power 120 volt appliances. That puny, dealer supplied battery can't survive that abuse. Use your generator instead. You could upgrade your battery to LiFePo4 (lithium) with no impact on weight...just your wallet. That's a whole different discussion. Now some REALLY bad news. Your rig is equipped with a 12 volt compressor fridge. They eat batteries alive. Your dealer supplied battery can deliver about 35 amp hours of USABLE power (half the battery's rated capacity). Guess what? Your fridge EATS 35 amp hours per day on average. In decent conditions, the solar can more than keep up during the day, but at night when you also might run the furnace, it's likely that your fridge and furnace will consume most of a fully charged battery overnight. Fuggedaboud lights, water pump, stereo, TV, awning in and out, tongue jack, slide, and the ever present parasitic loads that eat 3 amp hours per day all by themselves. So, look into more battery and more solar...and make sure you have a good generator...if you boondock. Otherwise, you'll ruin that battery in a few outings by over-discharging it. I just assigned you a ton of homework, but that's part of the fun.

Those are the "accessories" and functional things I recommend to get the most of your new rig. Enjoy.
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Old 12-07-2023, 06:21 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by LostArrow3 View Post
Any other needs you recommend will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
A tongue lock is recommended https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08C9T4NKY...5eb446420&th=1 (not recommending this one)pick the style you like
When you hook up, make certain that the emergency brake cable doesn't drag on the ground. We used a carabiner clip so that it had some freedom of movement.
Always check to make certain your brake and marker lights are working before you leave.
Many people buy a Tire Pressure Monitoring system to alert if there are problems.
Then practice backing the trailer.

And most of all, learn to chock the trailer wheels before you unhook from the tow vehicle. One of us forgot to chock on what looked like a level site and almost lost it down a grade. A huge log at the back of the campsite saved us.

You're going to have quite an adjustment... more space but also more dependence on electrical campsites. More abiity to unhook and go, but more driving to get to attractions and back to the campsite. We went from a travel trailer to a B+ due to age and medical needs, but that has it's own pluses and minuses.

Congratulations on your new rig and welcome to the forum!
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Old 12-07-2023, 06:28 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Rhumblefish View Post
Important heads up on using the Anderson WDH hitch.

As much of a fan as I am of the product, potential owners should take a gander at the frame damage issue, discussed here, and take note of the suggested ways to mitigate/address (namely, fish plates and/or weld in place).

Particularly important for those at the upper end of the weight limit for the Anderson, as correcting increased tongue weight puts more force into the trailer frame.

Just my .02, hope this helps.
I've also seen many Andersen owners with larger/heavier trailers, say that the Andersen WDH doesn't work well. Seems to be perfect WDH for smaller trailers with smaller tow vehicles, that have limited payload capacities or lower hitch capacities.
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Old 12-07-2023, 06:51 PM   #9
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I've read, the tongue lock in question can easily , be knocked off with a Hammer. I bought the lock , before reading that, the first use I panicked. I secured the lock with the
Tongue receiver lever open. I pushed the lock up tight. Next day, realizied I couldn.t unlock it. Thought I would need a master lock Smith to come out. But Lucy with a Hammer and turn of the key, it came lose. I realized I went past the last tooth. Won't do that again!
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Old 12-08-2023, 01:11 PM   #10
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More from the "facts of life" side of the story. Several more recommendations based on your shift from a Class B motorhome to a bumper-pull travel trailer.

Consider adding air bags to your rear suspension. As my signature says, I have Firestones on my 2006 (ancient) RAM 1500. I don't have a preference for them. They are what the RV dealer (where I bought my 2014 highwall popup) had, so that's what I bought.

Why? Won't the WDH level out the rig and restore unloaded ride height on the Tahoe? Well, yes and no. While the WDH can work miracles on leveling things out and transfering some of the tongue weight to the front axle of the TV, your Tahoe has a "ride oriented" rear suspension. Soft and cushy...perhaps a better word is "flacid." Especially now that those springs are 10 years old. The air bags will firm up that rear suspension...taking a lot of wallow out of the whoop-de-dos so common on todays ill-maintained roads. In essence, they are "more spring." And more spring resists that downward plunge of the rear suspension when the going gets rough. 30 PSI in the bags will work wonders for your handling...and allow you to slightly lessen the tension on the WDH.

I am not suggesting you do without a WDH, but airbags can be so effective that, in my case, with a significantly bigger and heavier trailer that has the potential for far more tongue weight, I don't use a WDH. When I bought the X213, I asked the salesman about a WDH. He said that, I should first try the rig without a WDH, because I have the bags. Low and behold, he was right. I DO notice that the front axle on the RAM is slightly lighter, but not much. I have excellent steering control and the front-axle braking is not impacted...I never trigger ABS with hard stops...and I've tried. I drive the Rockies...mountain passes at 11,500 feet and 20+ miles of ascent and descent with hairpin turns, cliffs, no guardrails, and more. (See photos.) My setup is safe and reliable. That's what airbags can do, so bags in combo with a WDH will significantly improve your handling.

Next: Tires.
What's on your Tahoe? At minimum, you'll want to inflate your rear tires to sidewall max. Why? You'll be loading the Tahoe to at or near its max payload capacity. Posted tire pressures on your door jamb are for day to day driving at what Chevy decides are typical payloads...for comfort, best tire wear, and best traction. But once you "crush" the rear end with max load, you'll want to firm up the tires so they flex less with each rotation, which makes them run cooler. And the firmer tire will squirm much less going through turns and other transitions...say fighting the air blast of a passing semi. If your tires are "old"...as in about 5 years or more...get new ones. 5 year old tires, regardless of tread depth, are aging out. Old tires tend to fail catastrophically...especially when worked hard. If you decide to buy new tires, consider upgrading to a higher load range tire for this service.

Your Tahoe is essentially built on a 1/2 ton pickup chassis, but it's configured to be a passenger car....a heavy duty grocery getter. A friend tows with an older Tahoe, and he does fine, but he has taken a number of steps to beef up the Tahoe for this hard work.

Next, learn to shift manually. Yes, the transmission will do the shifting for you, but on a long, uphill grade, it's torture for your transmission to be forced to downshift at full throttle, be allowed to upshift, and then forced to downshift again...at full throttle. Since many uphill climbs, especially to good camping, are twisting roads, the tendency is to lift off the throttle entering a turn - resulting in an upshift - only to floor the throttle - forcing a downshift - exiting the turn. This is torture for the transmission and the passengers. Instead, manually select a lower gear that does the job and leave it there. The Tahoe and your family will thank you. My old Dodge has what's laughingly called a 4 speed with OD. It's just a 3 speed transmission with electric OD and 4th gear tacked onto the output of the old fashioned 3 speed. Select "OD Off" and I have 3 gears. As luck would have it, I can drive all day at 60 MPH in 2nd gear at comfortable RPMs...about 1500 RPM below redline...up and down and up again. In the thin air of the Rockies, my naturally aspirated RAM 5.7 "Hemi" (that's a joke) doesn't make the power it would at sea level, so I spend LOTS of time in 2nd gear.

Even more important is manually downshifting on the downhills. My philosophy is that the brakes are for emergencies or for scrubbing off a little excess speed entering a turn, but I use them as little as possible. Out here, most long descents are speed limited at 35 MPH. It just so happens that my Dodge redlines at 44 MPH in 1st gear. I can go all day at 35 MPH in 1st gear on downhills (or steep uphills). I keep my brakes cool and save them for the moment a mountain goat or elk steps out in front of me.

Lots of guys in the forum will tell you to let your tow/haul selection on the transmission do its work. Out in the flat (rare around here), I'll do that, too. But nothing babies the transmission and brakes like manual shifting. And nothing is scarier than following some novice down Wolf Creek Pass with his brakes smoking and nearly on fire...except knowing he's BEHIND me.

Lastly...at least for now...is trailer sway. Heavy tongue weight limits sway, but it's always a threat your Class B never had to deal with. Sway is typically caused by the bow wave of a large truck or entering/exiting underpasses on a windy day...entering while countering the cross wind, hitting the dead air under the bridge, then encountering the crosswind on exit.
What's most valuable to know is how to stop it. APPLY THE TRAILER BRAKES ONLY using the manual brake button on the trailer brake controller. Practice this until it's second nature. Practice includes testing the trailer brakes using manual application as you begin every trip, and then occasionally manually applying trailer brakes only on downhills and other controlled situations...until reaching for that manual trailer brake application button is a well worn path for both your hand and your brain.

Your small, tongue-heavy rig is less likely to sway than most, but it's not immune from sway.


All of these are significant differences from your prior experience. As written here, all seem ominous. Of course, they're not...there are zillions of bumper pull RVs out there, but normal driving and driving a Class B don't equip you for driving 10,000 pounds (combined) of tow vehicle and trailer with a giant hinge in the middle.

Best of luck, and safe travels.
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Old 12-08-2023, 03:10 PM   #11
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Congrats! I had a 20BHS and it was a wonderful trailer.


Note, I measured my tongue weight, with about 5 gallons of fresh water in it (for on-the-road potty stops and hand washing), two batteries and two propane tanks, and was around 750 lbs.
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Old 12-08-2023, 09:17 PM   #12
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Congrats pulling the trigger. My GeoPro works well with 800 lb bars for my WDH, which is probably the most my tongue would ever weigh, but still works well for 700 lbs. 600 lb bars may be too light, unless you are a minimalist camper, will never put bicycles on the tongue, never travel with water.
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Old 12-08-2023, 09:18 PM   #13
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Congrats! I had a 20BHS and it was a wonderful trailer.


Note, I measured my tongue weight, with about 5 gallons of fresh water in it (for on-the-road potty stops and hand washing), two batteries and two propane tanks, and was around 750 lbs.
You can get away with only 5 gallons? When I'm that low, the pump starts spitting and doesn't work right.
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Old 12-09-2023, 07:46 PM   #14
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You can get away with only 5 gallons? When I'm that low, the pump starts spitting and doesn't work right.
Interesting, and it's just an estimate, but yes.

One of the things I liked about the trailer was that I could get down on my hands and knees and see how much water was in the fresh water tank. I'd fill a bit, then check, then fill a bit more, and check again, always staying well below the 1/3 level on the 30 gallon tank and call it good.

The 25BRDS I have now is a sealed bottom so i can't do a visual check. It's a 58 gallon fresh water tank. If the first light (1/3 tank) comes on when I check the level, I know I have way too much.
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Old 12-09-2023, 08:12 PM   #15
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Second

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If the first light (1/3 tank) comes on when I check the level, I know I have way too much.
If the firstsecond light (1/3 tank) comes on when I check the level, I know I have way too much.
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Old 12-09-2023, 09:29 PM   #16
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If the firstsecond light (1/3 tank) comes on when I check the level, I know I have way too much.
Correct. The first light is empty. If the second light (1/3 tank) comes on, I have more than I want.
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Old 12-10-2023, 08:13 AM   #17
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Lots of fud about the andersen . it works great for those that know how to use it and set it up . 9800 lbs TH never a problem with the andersen nor any damage to the frame . this is the way it is for 99% of the Andersen hitch users ..
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Old 12-10-2023, 10:07 AM   #18
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Interesting, and it's just an estimate, but yes.

One of the things I liked about the trailer was that I could get down on my hands and knees and see how much water was in the fresh water tank. I'd fill a bit, then check, then fill a bit more, and check again, always staying well below the 1/3 level on the 30 gallon tank and call it good.

The 25BRDS I have now is a sealed bottom so i can't do a visual check. It's a 58 gallon fresh water tank. If the first light (1/3 tank) comes on when I check the level, I know I have way too much.
Just my experience, but rolling with a third of a tank in that 30g tank has never been an issue. I always made that my minimum, because as I mentioned, when it gets low the pump won't shut off, or would start to spit, etc. So glad I have all the tanks and plumbing visible for reasons you mentioned, and if I ever go to another model, will make sure it is similar.
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Old 12-10-2023, 01:26 PM   #19
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For that small and light trailer, the Andersen WDH would be great! I have one (5,200 lb gross 26' trailer with 800 lbs on the tongue), tow vehicle is 2015 GMC Yukon Denali.
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Old 12-11-2023, 09:47 AM   #20
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A number of EPro owners on this forum use a Fastway e2 with 800 lb bars… another good alternative is the Equalizer 4 pt. I have the E2, if I was to buy again, I would buy the Equalizer. The E Pro trailer, being single axle and the weight at the hitch has significant rocking at the hitch. A WDH that stiffens that connection makes a big improvement when towing on roads that are not smooth… I have over 25k miles towing mine, in every condition…
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