Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-30-2020, 05:05 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 2
New to travel trailers

We just bought a 2014 Forest River Flagstaff Super Lite 27BESS. Any advice on potential problems before we take it on the road?
DLC1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2020, 05:12 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 2,926
Congratulations on your purchase and welcome to the form.
Check your tires and lights. Do a walkaround to make certain everything is buttoned up and solid.
Do you have any concerns?
__________________
2015 Dynamax REV 24TB class C
Reverse_snowbird is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2020, 05:31 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
rsdata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Northern KY
Posts: 4,059
there is a date code molded into the tire carcass... this will tell you how old the tire is, if you do not know for sure. It is always recommended that traveltrailer tires be replaced every 5-6 years no matter the mileage or how they look.

You can google tire date code to figure out how to read it to determine the tire's age.

Many replace with non-China made tires from Goodyear Endurance brand, Carlisle, and others.

Second...
do a driveway camping trip... get to know the systems while at home... figure out what works and what does not work, and what you need in the trailer...

and back to tires... do you have a way to jack up and change a trailer tire, and do you know how to do it correctly and where to jack the trailer without damaging the axle?
__________________
"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. " - Ronald Reagan
Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” – Mark Twain

2014 Shamrock 183
2014 RAM 1500 Bighorn Crew Cab, HEMI, 3.21 gears, 8 Spd, 4X4 TST TPMS
rsdata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2020, 06:09 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsdata View Post
there is a date code molded into the tire carcass... this will tell you how old the tire is, if you do not know for sure. It is always recommended that traveltrailer tires be replaced every 5-6 years no matter the mileage or how they look.

You can google tire date code to figure out how to read it to determine the tire's age.

Many replace with non-China made tires from Goodyear Endurance brand, Carlisle, and others.

Second...
do a driveway camping trip... get to know the systems while at home... figure out what works and what does not work, and what you need in the trailer...

and back to tires... do you have a way to jack up and change a trailer tire, and do you know how to do it correctly and where to jack the trailer without damaging the axle?
They have kept all of the manuals so hopefully directions will be there?. We pick it up tomorrow. The only camper we've had was a truck camper.
DLC1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2020, 07:14 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: North of Seattle, WA
Posts: 9,328
Largest issues with travel trailers is Tires (keeping them at right inflation pressure), batteries (keeping up with water use), and leaks. Regular visits to the roof to inspect for any damage to roof membrane and cracking at seams/edges, will keep the leaks away.

The rest is just keeping it clean and organized the way you like it.

Check wheel bearings and brakes regularly. Once per year is recommended although some have their own schedules. Point is DON"T IGNORE the parts that keep the trailer rolling.
__________________
"A wise man can change his mind. A fool never will."

"You only grow old when you run out of new things to do"

2018 Flagstaff Micro Lite 25BDS
2004 Nissan Titan
TitanMike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 12:56 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 4
Like others said, do a complete walk around, especially tires. I was fortunate to buy mine from a local Mom & Pop dealer who did a 100% test of everything before I picked up and spent at least 1 1/2hrs with me during the pickup going over everything.
Do yourself a favor for your first trip. Go someplace close to home and get full hook up, assuming you have a bath, toilet, ect. Try everything on the camper, AC, heater, plugs, lights, water heater, water pump from your water tank, also city water from the campground water and anything else you have. As a side note, run the heater and oven for the 1st time with doors and windows open as new appliances like these can let off oil fumes from the manufacturing parts in those appliances. If something goes wrong, you are at least close to home so you could pack up and leave.
Jim CB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 01:15 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 3,217
It's a 2014

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim CB View Post
Like others said, do a complete walk around, especially tires. I was fortunate to buy mine from a local Mom & Pop dealer who did a 100% test of everything before I picked up and spent at least 1 1/2hrs with me during the pickup going over everything.
Do yourself a favor for your first trip. Go someplace close to home and get full hook up, assuming you have a bath, toilet, ect. Try everything on the camper, AC, heater, plugs, lights, water heater, water pump from your water tank, also city water from the campground water and anything else you have. As a side note, run the heater and oven for the 1st time with doors and windows open as new appliances like these can let off oil fumes from the manufacturing parts in those appliances. If something goes wrong, you are at least close to home so you could pack up and leave.
It's a 2014. They can probably ignore the part about burning in the furnace and oven.
__________________
Larry

Sticks and Bricks: Raleigh, NC
2008 Cherokee 38P: at Ivor, VA permanently
Larry-NC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 02:20 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 594
Check the speed rating on your tires. Older trailers had ratings of about 65 mph. I had many blow outs at that speed and lower. Newer trailers have 81 or 87 mph speed ratings. I also recommend upgrading the load range of your tires when you replace them. It seems that most trailer tires are rated for the weight of an empty trailer. You'll have less problems with stronger tires. If you can afford it, install a TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) on your trailer. You do a lot of damage when someone has to honk and point to tell you that you've had a blowout.

Speed Rating Maximum Speed

J Up to 62 mph
K Up to 68 mph
L Up to 75 mph
M Up to 81 mph
N Up to 87 mph
__________________
2009 Roo 21ss + 2007 Superduty 6.0
mnoland30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 03:12 PM   #9
Tundra 2014
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Texas
Posts: 896
New trailer

Check tires, lube axels, invest in a drive on tire change ramp (can be used for a tongue jack stand). The drive on ramp makes changing a tire or lubing axels on a tandem much easier/quicker. Get some stabilizer blocks, or 4"X6"s and wheel chokes.
Tundra 2014 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 03:36 PM   #10
ARLO
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: N Chili, NY
Posts: 806
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsdata View Post
there is a date code molded into the tire carcass... this will tell you how old the tire is, if you do not know for sure. It is always recommended that traveltrailer tires be replaced every 5-6 years no matter the mileage or how they look.

You can google tire date code to figure out how to read it to determine the tire's age.

Many replace with non-China made tires from Goodyear Endurance brand, Carlisle, and others.

Second...
do a driveway camping trip... get to know the systems while at home... figure out what works and what does not work, and what you need in the trailer...

and back to tires... do you have a way to jack up and change a trailer tire, and do you know how to do it correctly and where to jack the trailer without damaging the axle?
For changing tires, I strongly recommend Camco RV trailer aid plus or Camco RV trailer aid. The plus just gives you a little more lift. Used properly you will never have to worry about ruining your axles. It takes the time to jack and trailer up to change the tire down to about 30 seconds.I am definitely happy with mine.
rlocicero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 03:57 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
dmctlc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Florida
Posts: 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLC1 View Post
They have kept all of the manuals so hopefully directions will be there?. We pick it up tomorrow. The only camper we've had was a truck camper.
First welcome to the forum and congratulations on your new RV.
So not sure if this was a private sale or through a dealership but whatever the case is before you sign on the dotted line make sure you do a thorough PDI. Try everything and anything that is electrical, mechanical, and in between. Once you drive out it will be tougher to get it fixed through a dealer and next to impossible if it's a private sale. Crawl underneath and check the tanks to make sure they're securely fastened. Run water through every faucet, shower make sure the HW heater is working, nothing is leaking especially underneath the unit. Check around the windows to make sure no mold or leaks. Extend the slides, check the awnings on them and the main awning. As other have mentioned check the tires and if they as old as others have mentioned or you see cracking, checking, etc. be ready to replace them. Run the Refrigerator, Microwave, TVs, and the water pump. Have you check the roof? It's important for degradation, rips, cuts, mold especially being 6+ yrs old. My point is some folks just look at an RV whether it's a TT, 5er, MH or anything in between and when they drive off and try to return it or get it fixed it can be a new ballgame depending on how and where you bought it. Lot's of folks, have minor issues they fix themselves but this forum as well as others will introduce you to those, in many cases, are lets' just say, not happy.
__________________
Dana & Terri - (Retired)
Stephanie (daughter)/Rick/Callie (12 y/o)
Phillip (son)/Alyssa/Charlotte (4 y/o)
Our Cocker Spaniel "Shadow" (4 y/o)
dmctlc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 04:43 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Tom48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Ontario, California
Posts: 1,593
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLC1 View Post
They have kept all of the manuals so hopefully directions will be there?. We pick it up tomorrow. The only camper we've had was a truck camper.
a lot of things are very similar to your truck camper if it was a full featured camper. We did know that from our Lance slide in to our several bumper pulls, we were taking a step down in quality. For the age of that trailer I would say check where all your major electrical connections are but most importantly check where the battery negative cable bolts to the frame. In my older rigs and in several I have helped the ground connection was never real first class and a little bit of corrosion suddenly results in a week electrical connection on the ground. Well you're under there check for the fuse or circuit breaker on the positive battery cable as it leaves the battery boxes and goes under the frame. it's just a good idea to know where it is and if it is a fuse like one of mine was, be sure you have a replacement fuse or two with you. For that matter today I think I would replace the fuse with a resettable DC circuit breaker.

Make sure your tanks are clean and odor free. Then perform complete flush of the freshwater system with bleach water. I think they usually recommend something like a teacup full of bleach for 15 gallons of fresh water capacity. That concentration allowed to sit in the system for a few hours will ensure sanitary water and then pumping it through the black and gray tank will help ensure that those tanks are clean and healthy before you get your RV life going with that rig.

I will spare you my getting on my solar soapbox but that's always something to have in the back of your mind. If you plan to do anything other than go straight from your house to a full hookup, be sure you have two batteries or more. and if you don't envision spending your life on hookups make sure you have some way to recharge your batteries in camp. Newbies think the electrical connection through their seven-pin bumper connector will recharge their batteries but without special wiring and special appliances it won't.

The driveway camping was a good recommendation and of course enjoy.
__________________
Tom48
In Sunny So Cal /w
Now in 2005 Holiday Rambler Ambassador DP and The Hot Air Balloon RESTLESS
NO MORE Tricked out
2017 Sandstorm 250 T.H.
Tom48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 08:32 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 131
1. Check the tires (condition, date code) and tire pressure
2. Check every inch of the sealing...including the roof. Repair where needed.
3. Check all appliances (on both propane and electric where applicable and make sure water is in the hot water heater - full - before turning it on).
4. Pressurize the water system and let is sit with the pump on.....listen for cycling indicating a loss of pressure.
5. Cycle the slide outs multiple times to ensure they operate properly
6. Grease the axle hubs
7. Check every electrical outlet inside and out.
8. Use it a night or two at your house before taking a trip.
__________________
2019 RW 2902WS
2019 Ford F-150 CC 4x4 w Max TT
TheMcBees is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 09:18 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Dayton Ohio
Posts: 1,764
Stock up the fridge and go somewhere Close And practice camping.

Got to sort of sort things out. Need full service site and an Ace hardware close!

There will be minor issues. Part of the fun. Fire at night. Sleep late. Eat and drink too much. Plan major jobs out. Practice.

Check the date code on the tires. Check pressure.
Use the water pump.
Use the Water heater gas and electric.
Use the furnace and ac.
Check out the battery bank age and capacity.
tomkatb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 09:24 AM   #15
Old Camping Squid
 
Eagle-751's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northeastern Ohio
Posts: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom48 View Post

Make sure your tanks are clean and odor free. Then perform complete flush of the freshwater system with bleach water. I think they usually recommend something like a teacup full of bleach for 15 gallons of fresh water capacity. That concentration allowed to sit in the system for a few hours will ensure sanitary water and then pumping it through the black and gray tank will help ensure that those tanks are clean and healthy before you get your RV life going with that rig.



I was always tough and go by 1/4 cup of bleach with every 10 gallons, my 40 gallon fresh water tank takes 1 cup of bleach. Never put straight bleach into the tank, dilute it into four gallons of water and add it to the tank that way. I put about 10 gallons into the tank first then the four gallons of mixed bleach and water and then fill it up. I do this every spring, a great idea after you flush the anti freeze out of the lines. If you do this, you should be good.
Only one other idea, get yourself a cheap temp gun, check your bearing temps each time you stop for fuel, food or anything else, you will see the temps are all about the same and will learn how much above ambient temp is normal for your camper. I use it on each trip no mater what trailer I tow, they are different depending on load, the camper is different from my cargo or the utility trailers. It's just another peace of mind.
__________________
Larry Collins { PM }
2006 F150 Supercab 5.4 Flex Fuel
2017 H-D FLHTK Ultra Limited
2006 BRP Outlander XT
2009 Forest River Salem 30QBSS
U.S. Navy Veteran
Eagle-751 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
trailer, travel, travel trailer

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:25 PM.