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Old 02-09-2018, 06:58 PM   #1
TMS
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2509s Towing?

Hey everyone. I know asking tow questions on here opens a can of worms as far opinions go but I'm going to do it anyway, so here we go.

I've found what I think is my dream TT - the Rockwood Mini Lite 2509s. Hitch weight is listed as essentially 700#s on the new model.

Now my issue. I have a Ford F150 FX4 Super Crew . The tow capacity is 9,500# however the GVWR on the truck is 7200#. The truck with me (200#) in it and a full tank of gas weighs 6250#. This leaves 950#. 950-700 = 250# for the wife, kid (eventually kids), and gear in the truck. Now onto the questions.

1. Has anyone with a 2509s actually taken it to the weigh station and gotten real hitch weight? I've heard manufacture published hitch weights are optimistic at best.

2. Since I'd be pushing the limits on payload, what are things I can do to improve safety while towing? I know about anti sway hitches and would definitely be using one. But what about adding airbags to beef up the suspension? Any other recommendations?

3. What are people towing this (or similar) TT's with? What has their experience been? I'm planning to do weekend warrior towing. Nowhere near full-time and we'll be in the midwest where the terrain is flat for the most part. I'd be interested in hear different stories about people who have put similar vehicles to the test with the same or near same TT.

Lastly, I'm not getting a new tow vehicle. I wish. I've only had the F150 for a little over a year and the wife would shoot me if I told her I wanted to upgrade to a 250. Plus I just love the truck. So yeah, thanks for any insight into my situation you might be able to provide. I appreciate it. If this post looks familiar it's because it is. I asked similar questions awhile back but since the 2509s has been around for a little longer now, I thought I'd revisit the issue. Thanks again everyone. I love reading all the differing point of views on this site and really take it to heart when trying to make decisions.

Cheers.
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Old 02-09-2018, 08:32 PM   #2
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Seems the 2509s thread I already once I should have read further into as some of these questions were already answered. Sorry for the repeat thread.
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Old 02-09-2018, 09:15 PM   #3
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IMO your combo will be fine for now...

Remember, your tongue weight will increase once you start packing stuff up-front like in the under-bed storage, front closets, and pass-through storage. For instance, our TT's empty tongue weight is 650, but ready-to-camp we're at 1100+... The empty tongue weight did not factor-in (2) full propane tanks, (2) batteries to power residential fridge, (4) tubs full of tools & stuff in pass-through storage, (6) heavy camping chairs under bed, (2) full closets, enough water for a couple flushes in the front FW tank, etc...

That said, IMO the 2 of you (plus 1 younger child?) can pack light-enough to enjoy this combo as-is. As long as you keep the PU bed empty & don't over-load the front pass-through storage, etc. you can keep everything within your payload. You can always add airbags if you want a more stable rear-end but you NEED a quality WDH, like the affordable Equalizer 4 1200... Our local dealer wouldn't budge from their competitive Internet sale pricing, but when push came to shove they included the WDH, installation & other extras for "free"...

What will get tricky is when you have (bigger) kids & want to bring along their bikes, scooters, dog(s), etc... However, even with that, there are work-arounds. For instance, we mount our (5) bikes to turned-over dinette seats with quick-release fork mounts. With a 3/4 ton we could place the bikes under our fiberglass cap, but that's where I keep the generators, gas, firewood, etc. - stuff I do not want in the TT... Now that they are teenagers, we bring-along inflatable kayaks, extra outdoor tables, canopy tent, firewood, etc. so there is very little room inside the fiberglass cap... And, that's with all of their bikes in the dinette & rear bedroom full of their stuff...

BTW I LOVE our outdoor kitchen. Wouldn't buy another TT without one. Keeps me from having to go in & out when grilling...
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:35 PM   #4
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hitch weight

Doesn't the WDH take some of the load off the hitch?
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Old 09-10-2018, 07:32 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by TMS View Post
Hey everyone. I know asking tow questions on here opens a can of worms as far opinions go but I'm going to do it anyway, so here we go.

I've found what I think is my dream TT - the Rockwood Mini Lite 2509s. Hitch weight is listed as essentially 700#s on the new model.

Now my issue. I have a Ford F150 FX4 Super Crew . The tow capacity is 9,500# however the GVWR on the truck is 7200#. The truck with me (200#) in it and a full tank of gas weighs 6250#. This leaves 950#. 950-700 = 250# for the wife, kid (eventually kids), and gear in the truck. Now onto the questions.

1. Has anyone with a 2509s actually taken it to the weigh station and gotten real hitch weight? I've heard manufacture published hitch weights are optimistic at best.

2. Since I'd be pushing the limits on payload, what are things I can do to improve safety while towing? I know about anti sway hitches and would definitely be using one. But what about adding airbags to beef up the suspension? Any other recommendations?

3. What are people towing this (or similar) TT's with? What has their experience been? I'm planning to do weekend warrior towing. Nowhere near full-time and we'll be in the midwest where the terrain is flat for the most part. I'd be interested in hear different stories about people who have put similar vehicles to the test with the same or near same TT.

Lastly, I'm not getting a new tow vehicle. I wish. I've only had the F150 for a little over a year and the wife would shoot me if I told her I wanted to upgrade to a 250. Plus I just love the truck. So yeah, thanks for any insight into my situation you might be able to provide. I appreciate it. If this post looks familiar it's because it is. I asked similar questions awhile back but since the 2509s has been around for a little longer now, I thought I'd revisit the issue. Thanks again everyone. I love reading all the differing point of views on this site and really take it to heart when trying to make decisions.

Cheers.
Look at a pair of Timbren SES rear suspension add ons. They replace your existing rear bump stops. They are passive in that they take effect when the truck is loaded. Otherwise they retain your trucks original ride when not in use. IMO they are better than air bags and no maintenance. Also I believe they are made in Canada.
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Old 09-11-2018, 09:49 AM   #6
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We tow our 2509S with an Diesel Excursion using an equalizer WDH, but we have been renting our unit out and the last two renters had F150s and towed it without issue using our WDH. I did notice their back end drop some, but they said it felt find towing. So it can be done, now should it be done and is it safe, not sure but it is advertised (At least by the sales folks) that is can be towed by a 1/2 done.
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Old 09-11-2018, 10:14 AM   #7
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First, your actual tow capacity will be on your door jamb sticker. So, you don't have to do the theoretical math to calculate this. It's already rated.

Second, your trailer won't have a 700 lb hitch weight. The GVWR of the 2509 is in the 6,500 lb neighborhood and you'll have that thing loaded in the 6,000-6,300 lb range. They're a little front-heavy, so figure 12-13% on the tongue. You'll be in the 750-800 lb range ... probably closer to 800 lbs.

Then, as you have done, add up the weights of the people in the truck, the WDH itself, any aftermarket parts (lights, stereos, bumpers), any gear, pets, wood in the bed, bikes, etc. Make sure that all of this adds up to a number less than your door jamb payload rating ... you'll pass this # long before your tow capacity on a 1/2 ton.

I struggle to tow mine ... though I'm usually at 5,000 - 8,000'. If you're at lower altitudes, your experience will be better than mine.

You said nothing about the year of your truck, the options, the engine, or anything else. So, it's difficult to offer much more insight there.

Good luck.
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Old 09-11-2018, 10:28 AM   #8
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It might help you some, but I am pretty sure Ford included the weight of a full gas tank in the available payload number on the sticker. Most F150s screws will land in the 1400-1700# range for available payload.
I pull my 2905ws w/ a 900# rough tw with my 2016 screw and it handles not problem. Granted I have max tow on it and also is the Equalizer hitch. My available pl is 1760#.
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Old 09-24-2018, 08:17 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by H-Allen View Post
Doesn't the WDH take some of the load off the hitch?
Absolutely not.
WDH is a weight distribution device, not a weight elimination device. It distributes weight across both truck axles instead of only the rear axle, but virtually the entire tongue weight is carried by the TV
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Old 09-24-2018, 09:38 PM   #10
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X2 on the Timbrens! Got the 5400 pound models on our 2014 Chevy 1/2 ton. Now the truck rides the same with or without the 2504s attached. I do not use a WDH or sway control and have no problems. Jay
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Old 09-25-2018, 06:36 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by TMS View Post
Hey everyone. I know asking tow questions on here opens a can of worms as far opinions go but I'm going to do it anyway, so here we go.

I've found what I think is my dream TT - the Rockwood Mini Lite 2509s. Hitch weight is listed as essentially 700#s on the new model.

Now my issue. I have a Ford F150 FX4 Super Crew . The tow capacity is 9,500# however the GVWR on the truck is 7200#. The truck with me (200#) in it and a full tank of gas weighs 6250#. This leaves 950#. 950-700 = 250# for the wife, kid (eventually kids), and gear in the truck. Now onto the questions.

1. Has anyone with a 2509s actually taken it to the weigh station and gotten real hitch weight? I've heard manufacture published hitch weights are optimistic at best.

2. Since I'd be pushing the limits on payload, what are things I can do to improve safety while towing? I know about anti sway hitches and would definitely be using one. But what about adding airbags to beef up the suspension? Any other recommendations?

3. What are people towing this (or similar) TT's with? What has their experience been? I'm planning to do weekend warrior towing. Nowhere near full-time and we'll be in the midwest where the terrain is flat for the most part. I'd be interested in hear different stories about people who have put similar vehicles to the test with the same or near same TT.

Lastly, I'm not getting a new tow vehicle. I wish. I've only had the F150 for a little over a year and the wife would shoot me if I told her I wanted to upgrade to a 250. Plus I just love the truck. So yeah, thanks for any insight into my situation you might be able to provide. I appreciate it. If this post looks familiar it's because it is. I asked similar questions awhile back but since the 2509s has been around for a little longer now, I thought I'd revisit the issue. Thanks again everyone. I love reading all the differing point of views on this site and really take it to heart when trying to make decisions.

Cheers.
Hi, I have a 2056s with 720 lbs dry tounge weight but I have a 2017 GMC Denali 2500 HD Duramax diesel which tows it effortlessly.

I also have a Big Country 3560ss in Florida which is why I have this truck should I need to move it.

As to what you can do to your truck is look at Timbren SES suspension upgrade. They are like air bags but passive and only come in play when loaded. Otherwise unloaded they don't change you ride. You can get for both front and back. Install them and forget them. They are $ 250 cdn for the rear and similar for front. I believe they are made in Canada

I like them and help keep the truck level when loaded. Check out their website.
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Old 09-25-2018, 09:22 AM   #12
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I just dragged a 26WFKSS Vlite from Florida to West Yellowstone and back. The trailer is close to #950 TW(checked with a Sherline ), and just over #7000 loaded.
Iím using the RAS(Roadmaster Active Suspension) on my 2010 F150 Screw. 5.4, 3.55, with the trailer tow package(not the max tow), and a Husky Centerline WDH. I also have a 5Star tuner to make my tranny behave. Newer trannies when in T/H, are probably much better.....maybe.

Look on the door sticker for ďpayloadĒ mine is #1306. The payload number for your F150, has a #150 driver and full tank of fuel included already(see the tow section in your owners manual for clarity). You need to keep track of passengers, TW, and junk in the trunk. Iím probably over on my payload, but my RAS compensates.

A WDH, shifts load to the trailer axles and the steering axle by using leverage. On your F150 and TT, youíll be over the trucks allowable TW w/o a WDH. I believe it is #500 before you need to use a WDH. You can Google your year of truck, and F150 towing guide, and get the Ford chart. Combine that info with whatís on the door sticker. Your door sticker is specific to how your truck rolled off the assembly line.

Look for a good hitch, that includes sway control. A well loaded trailer will tow fine, but it doesnít make it immune to physics when outside forces come to bear on the trailer. Sway control is that ďounce of preventionĒ. Youíll be glad you did, when you get in wide open places, and the wind picks up or you get into some nasty weather. Do some research. There are good products out there that donít cost an arm and a leg. Donít waste money on something cheap to save a buck. Buy more hitch then you need, not just enough. Give yourself a little cushion.

I was happy to have the WDH. Mine also handles sway control. There was plenty of crosswind in Kansas, Wyoming, Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. We got into approaching fronts going and coming home. Add in trucks passing me along with the wind, and the bow wave/suction combined with the wind, was interesting at times. The little Ford Transits, can cause as much issue as a semi when they pass you running 10 or 15 mph faster then you. Lol. I was surprised.

Things to think about.
I felt the truck handled it fine. I donít know if Iíd recommend my particular truck for anything close to the #9200 limit pulling over a 10k foot pass, but, as long as I did my part, I could run 60 and 65 at 3750 rpms going up the grades. If I was not paying attention, the truck would step down another gear on its own, and bump the revs to 4200+ or simply get overwhelmed, and my speed would drop to about 50. Learn to drive your truck. Pay attention, and you can get way more out of it, then just letting it go down the road in cruise, and feeling like the truck isnít capable. At my weights, Iím asking it to work. I canít expect it to act like it would if we were all going to Grannies house for Tday, without a trailer.
On normal highways running 65 to 75, the rpms stayed pretty steady in the 2 to 3000rpm range. Iím not a big fan of using the cruise control when the truck has to work. The tranny shifts to much. In rolling hills or flats I may engage it, but keep my foot on the gas, to prevent it down shifting going up the slope, and take my foot off going down. The first thing I noticed when the cruise was on, was the tranny would upshift to the highest gear, only to have to downshift one, when the truck went back to pulling the weight when it ran out of downhill. I used the cruise primarily to take a break. We ran about 5k miles, in 11 days. The combo would go 80 in rolling hills, if I wasnít paying attention.

My motor, doesnít make its max HP, and torque, until it gets north of 5000rpms. For people who have never wound their motors that high before, it can be a bit intimidating the first time or two. Itís the nature of the beast. I didnít ever get to the max power place on the power curve. Redline is beyond that.

After this last trip would I throw up my hands, and pronounce my truck incapable and get a bigger one? No. Iíd have to tow a butt load of miles, to make a new bigger TV even close to affordable or necessary. Maybe if I had disposable income spilling out of my pockets, but I doubt it. I recently went to a 10 ply tire, and aired them to about #62 to pull the trailer. I put a 10 ply on the TT also. With the 5 lug aluminum wheels on the TT, I kept the pressure at 62 like the truck, and it worked great.

If I were in your place, I would get a suspension aid either the Timbren, or the RAS. This is the 4th truck Iíve used the RAS on since 1993. I like it, because it doesnít just provide a bumpstop, but helps to keep the S curve issues from happening with leaf springs. Do some research, and watch the vids.
Most factory PUís that arenít designed and specíd to haul loads, will be more about soft ride in both the suspension and tire department.
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Old 09-25-2018, 09:34 AM   #13
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Absolutely not.
WDH is a weight distribution device, not a weight elimination device. It distributes weight across both truck axles instead of only the rear axle, but virtually the entire tongue weight is carried by the TV
Mostly true, but the WDH will put weight to the trailer axles as well. My home made tongue scale put my tongue at around 825#'ish (it's pretty sensitive), but CAT scales put additional weight on TV at 740# with WDH hooked up. Each TT/WDH combo will be different, but that's what mine is doing. Presumably that's why most trucks list 2 tongue weights. A lighter one w/o WDH and a heavier one with WDH.
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Old 09-25-2018, 03:03 PM   #14
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Look on the door sticker for ďpayloadĒ mine is #1306. The payload number for your F150, has a #150 driver and full tank of fuel included already(see the tow section in your owners manual for clarity). You need to keep track of passengers, TW, and junk in the trunk. Iím probably over on my payload, but my RAS compensates.
You're confusing TOWING capacity with PAYLOAD capacity.
If you check the manual, TOWING capacity uses a 150lb driver and full tank in its calculation.
PAYLOAD capacity only uses the full tank. The driver is considered as an OCCUPANT.
And your airbags do NOTHING to increase payload. All they do is help with rear sag.
So you're still over payload, in spite of the bags.
My Avalanche had better payload than yours. And I got a F150 with 1828lbs of payload to pull my new TT because the Avalanche didn't have enough payload.
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Old 09-25-2018, 03:35 PM   #15
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Not sure if this is helpful, but we're on our second trip with a new 2509S. As my signature states, our TV is a 2013 Tundra - 5.7 with tow package. Bought it used and the previous owner traded up, but had added airbags in the rear. I have an EazLift WDH and sway bar - rated @ 10,000/1,000. Can't make the claim that "...can't even tell it's back there..." but it does tow pretty well. We're in E. Tennessee, and climbing hills is ~interesting~ but no big deal, as our days of being in a hurry are long gone.



Have yet to do a proper weigh-in, and when I do, I will try to check back here to see if anyone has posted actual numbers.


Mickey
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Old 09-25-2018, 06:09 PM   #16
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2509s Towing?

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Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
You're confusing TOWING capacity with PAYLOAD capacity.
If you check the manual, TOWING capacity uses a 150lb driver and full tank in its calculation.
PAYLOAD capacity only uses the full tank. The driver is considered as an OCCUPANT.
And your airbags do NOTHING to increase payload. All they do is help with rear sag.
So you're still over payload, in spite of the bags.
My Avalanche had better payload than yours. And I got a F150 with 1828lbs of payload to pull my new TT because the Avalanche didn't have enough payload.



I think I said I was over on the payload. Not enough to cause problems, and certainly not enough to warrant a new TV.

They arenít airbags. Regardless, even though they arenít calculated in the mix by Ford, they do add load carrying potential. Saying they donít, ignores reality beyond the world Ford has decided it is safe in when protecting itself from any liability. Thatís what Ford does well. We pay dearly for their CYA. Saying the RAS doesnít add potential, defies physics. Iím confident in my understanding of how the RAS works. Ford doesnít like aftermarket motor upgrades either, but they do add HP(some of them do).

Iím secure in the knowledge Ford over engineers for the calculations they present for load carrying, to purposefully avoid problems. Iím not exceeding those by any huge amount, and am well under the GCWR for what I have. Thatís good enough for me. Other drivers are still in more danger from drunken illegals driving on the same road, then any threat I may offer in my chubby F150 with love handles.

As far as the weight calcs, Ford factors the driver into the mix with the base vehicle weight before extras. I find it odd, that they then back it out at a later time, just to add it somewhere else, but thatís Ford doing the math. I think they simply like to add enough cushion, they avoid problems via the legal beagles. Iím sure they know what theyíre doing, when it comes to what benefits them most.
They do however as you mention, weigh the driver again, when they get to payload. My bad. I forced myself to drink a margarita and say 10 hale Fords, in contrition.

The point of this was to let the OP know he/she were well within the capabilities of their current TV they donít want to get rid of. They also have options to improve its load carrying ability, even if Ford doesnít say, ďSure. Weíre cool with that.Ē This is based on real world experience, and not CYA engineering numbers put together by Ford.

My Screw is far nicer then your old Avalanche ever hoped to be. ;^D True story. It also works just fine with what I have. If I ditched the 4x4 and got rid of the elegant excesses of my Screw, I suspect my Payload would match or exceed those of the Avalanche. Iím happy you stepped up to a better TV. I think you made a good choice. I am jealous of the newer transmissions, and IIRC, you have the eco boost?( I canít see sigs on my iPad) I missed it by one ding dang year.
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Old 09-25-2018, 08:30 PM   #17
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If going over the payload is OK, can you let me know what the real payload rating is? That will help me, as I'm right at my limit ... which I guess is bogus.

Thanks.
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Old 09-26-2018, 10:26 AM   #18
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If going over the payload is OK, can you let me know what the real payload rating is? That will help me, as I'm right at my limit ... which I guess is bogus.

Thanks.


Bogus is probably the wrong word, but I suspect it might be loaded with sarcasm, so weíll go from there. If Iím wrong about the sarcasm, I apologize. Try not to squeeze your size 11 into the tiny glass slipper, if thatís the case.

I canít tell you what your wife considers to be an insufficient amount of attention. Do you always drive posted speed limits? Do you ever over eat? Do you overpay on your taxes? How often do you change the oil in your truck? Do you use Fords spec, or the mileage the oil manufacturer says the oil is good for? Do you send your oil out for evaluation to determine the correct mileage?

Ford doesnít have a clue what Iím going to do with the truck after I buy it. They donít care. They care even less, when I step over one of their arbitrary specs, because if/when I do, they arenít responsible anymore. Itís all about calculating risk for Ford.

The weight calculations used by manufacturers are numbers their marketing dept, engineers, and lawyers have determined fulfill two requirements. The numbers advertise how far the manufacturers are willing to stick their necks out. They want people to buy their product, and, they want to avoid liability.

The latter is the biggest, because liability involves not only financial consequences from lawsuits, and or federally mandated standards of compliance and safety, but the possibility of having to replace millions of a particular component that proved inadequate. A faulty airbag, is a far different matter, then a transmission or rear differential x several million.
If they were to close to the limits, weíd see more post about how ďI tore up the rear end....tranny.....brakes...Ē etc.. We donít. Even though to end user, is the weakest link in the chain. Manufacturers and regulators know that.
What we do see, is internet nannies with somebody elseís made up figures determining fantastic threats of bodily harm to their person. OMG!!!

How much of the payload limits on my Screw, are related to the room inside the cab, and the number of bodies that can be stuffed in it? Each of those bodies is a liability for Ford. If Ford screws up, its $$$ x the number of bodies. Kinda like when a plane crashes, and the lawyers line up. Every body is an individual claim. Iíd wager the number of bodies, is more of a liability then the additional weight contributed by junk in the trunk, and hitch numbers. They want to limit their liability, and warm bodies are conveniently covered under payload. Sometimes, it can even look like the driver gets counted twice.

Payload is a sketchy area, but of all the different max load specs, itís the easiest to calculate by the vehicles owner. If I go over that, Ford is absolved of liability. Oh my!!!
I realize that. Iím pretty sure Ford does also. Iíd even venture to say, itís their risk safety valve. Itís a tangible in an obscure world of ďwhat ifsĒ. An accident investigator can simply add up the numbers/weights if it comes to that, in a case against Ford seeking millions of $$ in compensation. Easy Peasy. ďJoe Camper was over the Payload, my client(Ford in this instance) is innocentĒ. Case closed. Iím still within the margin of error here. Theyíd have to sharpen their pencils.

Another spec is loading on the hitch. Mine is up to #500 before Ford says I have to use a WDH. Then, the limit jumps to #1130. Once I step to a WDH, and it is properly set up, the hitch shifts weight from the drive axle, to the steer axle and TT axles. That right there, gives me a Ďlittleí cushion, with my payload(but Ford doesnít say that. They already gave their number. Theyíll stick to it.). We are also getting into things that can break now. For me, this is were my caution/risk begins.

Iím under the hitch limit. Although close. I blame that darn front slideout.
Iím under the limit for my gvwr.
Iím under the GCWR for both the truck and trailer. By plenty.
I might be a couple hundred pounds over the payload. Iíve done some testing by increasing the payload, to decreasing it, to determine if it makes a difference in how the trailer tows for my particular set up. I couldnít tell the difference. It has even given me more confidence to use weight in the tanks if I want, when the wind gets up. The more weight down low, the more it counteracts the height of the TT. No Virginia, thatís not in the manual. I pack light enough in the trailer, to make this an option for me. If youíre carrying your wifeís cast iron skillet collection, you could consider that for the same purpose, unless you put it all on a top shelf in the kitchen.

Another thing to think about, is this is a truck. Unless, its one of those prissy pretty ďits a truckĒ but itís not, trucks. Itís a completely different animal, then say a small crossover SUV, advertising it can pull ďxĒ. I wouldnít even contemplate pushing a limit with one of those for any distance. I see a lot of people on the Forum tow with them though. I pulled a small Uhaul with a Windstar years ago, when they first came on the market. That was enough for me.

I donít think Fordís numbers are ďbogusĒ. I do think they are carefully calculated to prevent Ford from being accountable to anything but the bottom line. Itís all about the money. My safety margin lies in that area between brag and fact. Fact is arbitrary in this discussion. I say that, because Ford probably knows the limits of my trucks drive train, and are far enough below them with their specs, to offer them protection from liability. They arenít going to put that info out there though. Secret spices and herbs. Also, they gave a number they spent a butt load of money to come up with. They wonít deviate from it. Their lawyers would have a fit. Anybody who says different, in the company, would be looking for work.

How much cushion, does Ford build into their calculations? Thatís the question. Iím more concerned with fatigue testing on my rear differential, regarding where I might be over in this instance. Ford isnít number one in PU sales because their stuff breaks. Dodge would be in the dust bin, if it wasnít for Cummins. True story.
There is a pretty big overlap, between what you can tow with a 150, and a 250. When I see a 250 dragging less then mine that canít get up a grade, it makes me scratch my head. The operator bears some responsibility here. In many cases, all you really gain is mass. Dead weight to move around. Security for some. Iím cool with that. If it feels good do it. Simpler is best for some. If thatís the case, step up to a comfort level that suits you best. Nit picking from your grannies porch, solves nothing.

As far as your personal limitations for your truck/trailer combination? I think Fords numbers are ball-parked to protect Ford. They still offer a place to start. How secure are you, in your own ability to determine whatís to much? How risk sensitive are you. Whatís it like under the bed, when things go bump in the night?

My truck is a 2010. There isnít any warranty violation concern. I get to pay for it, if I break it. New trucks are expensive. If yours is still under warranty, that would be something to ponder. Although, Iím sure you wouldnít be the first to tell them you only drove it to church on Sunday, and to the car wash and dealership to get it serviced.

If I break something, more then likely it wonít be catastrophic. Either the tranny will start acting up(doubtful), or the differential will suffer to the point it will develop problems(doubtful). Bearings and or Joints will be the first to suffer. Have you had your rear differential serviced since you bought your truck? How about the transmission. Iíve done both, and mine has 55000 miles on it. I did them both at 30k, and Iíll do it again at 60k. My truck also has a trailer tow package. I was surprised at the number of people who think towing weight w/o a tranny cooler, was okay. My tranny temp gauge didnít even budge this last trip. Nor did the temp gauge. None of the indicators of abuse raised their heads. My truck didnít have to perform at the peak of its power curve, to do its job.

This is why Ford likes to say ďxĒ is the limit. Itís so much easier. Regulators have hard numbers to work with, instead of ďwhat ifsĒ, which would really be a nightmare for Ford. Ford sets the limit high enough to be attractive, but low enough to protect them from risk. Ford comes out swimming in dollars. The regulators get numbers to work with so they can approve something whether that approval is substantive or not. The trees whose lives were sacrificed in the name of regulation. Thousands upon thousands of pages of justification. Job creation, all at the expense of the taxpayer.

We have alligators in our bay, but I still swim in it. We have Moccasins in the weeds, but I still go outside. True story.
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Old 09-26-2018, 11:30 AM   #19
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Old 09-26-2018, 11:40 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by 67L48 View Post
If going over the payload is OK, can you let me know what the real payload rating is? That will help me, as I'm right at my limit ... which I guess is bogus.

Thanks.
From an engineer's perspective, the real payload limit is what is posted on the door frame. Go beyond that and you enter no man's land, plus open yourself up to potential insurance problems.

Does the TV have better than that capability? Possibly. Should you plan to test it? Not the wisest choice.
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