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Old 07-23-2022, 08:45 AM   #1
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Anode Rod Replacement Mini-Lite 2509S

Hi everyone, can anyone get me a specific part number for the proper anode rod for the water heater? I tried buying a universal rod off Amazon but I just canít get it to thread in to the socket. I ended up putting the old one back in for now.
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Old 07-23-2022, 09:00 AM   #2
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What is the make "manufacture" of the water heater?
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Old 07-23-2022, 09:06 AM   #3
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Of the two main RV water heaters - Suburban and Atwood (Dometic) - only the Suburban has an anode. So . . . . . I am assuming that yours is a Suburban.
That said, anode rods are generic and (AFAIK) any anode will fit any heater that needs one. They are just sometimes hard to thread in without cross-threading. I think that's because of the physics of the thing - - the long rod (and the majority of the weight) throws the balance at the threads off and it is easy to not get it aligned properly.

But, to answer your question, Suburban's numbers are:
magnesium rod #233514
aluminum rod #233516
for any of their heaters.
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Old 07-23-2022, 09:15 AM   #4
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Suburban 6.0 gallon, model # sw6del
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Old 07-23-2022, 09:36 AM   #5
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Thank you guys.
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Old 07-23-2022, 09:43 AM   #6
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Anode Threading

I have found that if you pack your socket with paper towels so that the nut of the rod is flush with the end of the socket it is much easier to thread it in correctly.
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Old 07-23-2022, 09:52 AM   #7
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I have found it best to start the rod by hand and then use the socket to tighten. The idea about the paper towels is a good one. I find that the rod tends to drop the front down due to weight and therefore you need to tip it up in order for the threads to catch right. The replacement rod for you water heater can be found on amazon as shown https://www.amazon.com/Suburban-2327...003VAYRNM?th=1
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Old 07-23-2022, 09:53 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimK2509S View Post
Suburban 6.0 gallon, model # sw6del
I have the same water heater, and this is what I use:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Camco-115...aters/29764280

The water heater threads are 3/4" NPT.
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Old 07-24-2022, 12:49 PM   #9
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Clean the threads with a wire brush

Get a small wire brush just larger than the opening or just smaller. Even a wire brush for a drill would work. But get brass or even hard nylon and not steel as you can damage threads. Spray some lime dissolver (eg. CLR, Limeaway, vinegar), clean with wire brush. Then rinse the threads clean of debris.
lubricate with a teflon tape, teflon paste, WD40 or water/dishsoap mix, or a slippery cleaner like simple green. As stated, use a long socket and place the "nut" head deep in it, shim around it with paper towels to center it. Grab the socked by hand and carefully start the threads. Take your time. When you know it's caught and not cross threaded, pull the socket off and remove the paper towels. Attach socket to ratchet and finish.

Note, if you are replacing original anode (if it's not too worn), clean it's thread and rinse well.
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Old 07-24-2022, 01:16 PM   #10
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Don't forget that it's a tapered thread. It will not go all the way down to where the head is flush with the tank opening. It needs to be tightened firmly, but no heroics are needed.

Lots of folks wrap some Teflon tape around the threads on the rod before installing it. Pay attention to which direction you wrap the tape. Wrapping in the wrong direction will cause it to unwind as the rod is screwed into place.
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Old 07-25-2022, 08:50 AM   #11
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Does anyone make an anode rod with plastic threads? Our last camper had a hot water heater that did not require an anode rod (aluminum) and the plastic threaded drain plug was super simple to install (no tape or cleaning necessary). I’ve looked, but can not find an anode rod with plastic threads. Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-25-2022, 09:04 AM   #12
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Does anyone make an anode rod with plastic threads? Our last camper had a hot water heater that did not require an anode rod (aluminum) and the plastic threaded drain plug was super simple to install (no tape or cleaning necessary). Iíve looked, but can not find an anode rod with plastic threads. Thanks in advance.
No. That would defeat the purpose of an anode rod. The threads need to be metal.

If you have a plastic plug, you don't need an anode rod.
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Old 07-25-2022, 09:07 AM   #13
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Wouldn't work

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Originally Posted by gak View Post
Does anyone make an anode rod with plastic threads? Our last camper had a hot water heater that did not require an anode rod (aluminum) and the plastic threaded drain plug was super simple to install (no tape or cleaning necessary). Iíve looked, but can not find an anode rod with plastic threads. Thanks in advance.
Uhhh, stop and think for a minute. The anode (receives electrons) element relies on electrical conductivity between the rod and the tank in order to protect the tank. If you insulate the rod from the tank (e.g., with a plastic plug), it won't provide any protection.

(For those wondering about the effect of Teflon tape on the plug, be advised that the tape is cut through by the threads as the plug is tightened. It only serves to fill the gaps between the pressure points.)
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Old 07-25-2022, 09:48 AM   #14
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Thank you Iwritecode and Larry-NC. Makes sense. I don't realize the tape breaks through to make metal to metal contact. Thanks for taking to time to help me understand.
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Old 07-25-2022, 09:52 AM   #15
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Just take a look

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Thank you Iwritecode and Larry-NC. Makes sense. I don't realize the tape breaks through to make metal to metal contact. Thanks for taking to time to help me understand.
Just take a look the tape remaining on the anode rod after it's been removed. It's only in the depth of the threads.
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Old 08-08-2022, 07:47 PM   #16
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Chaser (not what y'all are thinking)

TSC has a 3/4 thread chaser that I keep in the compartment and use occasionally. Those darn threads get rusty.
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Old 08-08-2022, 07:48 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yukongold View Post
Of the two main RV water heaters - Suburban and Atwood (Dometic) - only the Suburban has an anode. So . . . . . I am assuming that yours is a Suburban.
That said, anode rods are generic and (AFAIK) any anode will fit any heater that needs one. They are just sometimes hard to thread in without cross-threading. I think that's because of the physics of the thing - - the long rod (and the majority of the weight) throws the balance at the threads off and it is easy to not get it aligned properly.

But, to answer your question, Suburban's numbers are:
magnesium rod #233514
aluminum rod #233516
for any of their heaters.
I have just replaced my anode rod in my Rockwood 2608SB Suburban water heater, which takes the 235mm length rod. Yes, can be tricky to get thread started without cross threading. Rather than try and start the thread by holding the hex end in your hands with little manoevering room, you will have more control on aligning the rod correctly by holding the anode hex head, end on in the jaws of some long nosed multi-grip pliers, which will allow you to put some inward evenly aligned pressure on the rod whilst turning at the same time until the thread takes up correctly. From then on, you should be on the home straight to tighten, ensuring not to over tighten, just enough to ensure no leakage once you turn back on water supply. Don't forget to leave a hot tap open until water runs out to disperse all air, indicating that the cylinder is full and ready to use. Good luck.
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Old 08-08-2022, 08:21 PM   #18
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How to prevent this rusting

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Originally Posted by RVTailors View Post
TSC has a 3/4 thread chaser that I keep in the compartment and use occasionally. Those darn threads get rusty.
The secret to preventing rusting on the tank threads is:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secret
After you drain the tank for the winter, put the rod back in and tighten it. Keeping the damp air off the tank fitting and rod threads prevents rusting.

You can use Teflon tape, pipe dope, or nothing, whatever is your choice. The tank isn't going to break if a few water droplets freeze on the interior surface, so there's no benefit to leaving the rod out. And in the spring, there's one less task to do. Just open the valves and run water until the tank fills.
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Old 08-08-2022, 08:48 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
Don't forget that it's a tapered thread. It will not go all the way down to where the head is flush with the tank opening. It needs to be tightened firmly, but no heroics are needed.

Lots of folks wrap some Teflon tape around the threads on the rod before installing it. Pay attention to which direction you wrap the tape. Wrapping in the wrong direction will cause it to unwind as the rod is screwed into place.

Another thing to use on the threads is plumbers grease. Lubricates the threads and stop rust from forming. I leave my anode rod out during the winter to let the tank dry out. The grease protects the threads.
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Old 08-09-2022, 08:52 AM   #20
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Water heater anodes are sacrificial but seldom sacrifice everything. Yeah they'll tend to look bad after a while but an annual inspection is usually all that's needed and unless bare wire is showing just put it back.

But... I did find the 4' long anode in my 50 gallon water heater at home to be completely used up leaving nothing but what looked like a long coat hanger wire hanging in the tank. Local plumbing shop was astounded and called their entire staff to look at it. But this was after 15+ years of constant use not intermittent camper use. Anyone checked their anode at home raise your hand -- hmmm, not too many hands...

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