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Old 09-27-2021, 10:13 AM   #1
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Black tank flush valve

On my 2104s where would I locate the Black Water flush valve ? Does the entire line need to be winterized ? Or would compressed air do ?
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Old 09-27-2021, 10:21 AM   #2
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Not sure where your black tank flush is located but I would shoot some air in it to be on the safe side. Set your compressor to no more then 50 PSI.
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Old 09-27-2021, 10:58 AM   #3
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Typically any residual water in the system would drain out via both the input and output tubing (output side into the tank and the input side back out the hose connection port as the valve cavity empties). If you want to use air the black valve is 125psi max (minimum 40psi) and if it's a clear valve it's 200psi max (minimum 40psi).
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Old 09-27-2021, 11:52 AM   #4
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I use compressed air to blow out all lines including black tank flush lines. I don't use antifreeze except for drains.
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Old 09-27-2021, 02:50 PM   #5
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I use air for winterizing everything, including the black tank flush. I set my compressor output for about 45 PSI, and this is both plenty of pressure AND it's not too much...which could cause damage to the plumbing. Note that when connected to city water, you use a pressure regulator adaptor to ensure that city water pressure won't blow up your RV's plumbing, too.

While the black tank flush SHOULD self drain, it takes only seconds to blow it out, so why take the risk of water being trapped somewhere, especially in the portion in the black tank?

For years I got away with using a pancake compressor for the task, but it couldn't supply continuous air at adequate pressure. I'd have to disconnect, allow the compressor to recharge, then connect again for a short "puff." A few years ago, when we began to use our rig during the winter on unseasonably warm weekends, I upgraded to this modest - but more than adequate - compressor: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-30...303H/206532808.

The key to this compressor's success in winterizing a camper is it's 30 gallon tank. The tank holds a LOT of air, and at 45 PSI, it can deliver all the CFM you need for the job essentially continuously. I'm very happy with this choice. And for the record, in my past life, I had a farm, and I had an 80 gallon, two cylinder, two stage compressor for the kinds of heavy work I did there, and yet this little Husky is impressive in its own right.

Set to the proper output air pressure (about 45 PSI), one can go through the rig turning faucets on and off repeatedly and even leave all faucets off for any amount of time with no fear of damaging the rig's plumbing.

Once the rig is blown dry and the grey tank is dumped into a bucket, I put about a gallon of RV antifreeze down the toilet, and about 2 gallons distributed to all interior drain traps...most of this goes into the grey tank.

Last tips on air winterizing...
1) be sure to FIRST drain and bypass the hot water heater before applying air. Compressed air can't deal with the hot water heater.
2) do each faucet individually...going from one to the next until no water spits out.
3) don't forget the inside tub/shower, outdoor shower, toilet flush, and low point drains, and the mentioned black tank flush.
4) don't forget to drain your fresh tank.
5) add RV antifreeze to all inside drains: kitchen sink, bathroom sink, tub/shower to fill the traps and and add enough to the grey tank to protect the drain valve.
6) add RV antifreeze down the toilet...almost a gallon...and then shut the flush valve and add about half a cup on top of the flush valve to keep things moist.

It took twice as long to write this as it does to perform a full winterization with air.
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Old 09-27-2021, 08:33 PM   #6
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Way overcautious

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmoore13 View Post
I use air for winterizing everything, including the black tank flush. I set my compressor output for about 45 PSI, and this is both plenty of pressure AND it's not too much...which could cause damage to the plumbing. Note that when connected to city water, you use a pressure regulator adaptor to ensure that city water pressure won't blow up your RV's plumbing, too.

...

Set to the proper output air pressure (about 45 PSI), one can go through the rig turning faucets on and off repeatedly and even leave all faucets off for any amount of time with no fear of damaging the rig's plumbing.
The 45 psi limit is WAY overcautious, although it's certainly adequate for clearing the water lines.

Ever fill your water heater from one of those cool mountain streams you have there? And turn the heater on? When the water's warm, you will see some weeping out the temperature and pressure valve, right? And the pressure limit on that valve is 150 psi! Yes, that's right, 150 psi. That means that the water heater and all the plumbing to it and all the plumbing from it are at 150 psi. Nothing gets hurt.

Around here the city water is delivered at 140 psi, and every home has a pressure regulator just beyond the main shutoff valve (inside the home, not at the street--it's the homeowner's responsibility). These valves only last 10-15 years. I've replaced mine three times in 37 years. When they fail, the entire house(and the small trailer if it's hooked up) is subjected to 140 psi.

About the only way I know it's failed is that one particular toilet ballcock doesn't want to shut off fully. One time my clue was that the residential water heater T&P valve opened (full force, not a trickle) indicating I was receiving a full 150 psi from the city.
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Old 09-28-2021, 11:55 AM   #7
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Interesting. We are heading into our first winter with the trailer and I still haven't decided what I want to do about winterizing. I hadn't even considered the black tank flush valve. Great thread!
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Old 09-28-2021, 01:27 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
The 45 psi limit is WAY overcautious, although it's certainly adequate for clearing the water lines.
<<SNIP>>
Since water pressure regulators for city water inputs on RVs are set to pass between 40 and 50 PSI, with 45 PSI, I replicate that with air pressure. Furthermore, that modest air pressure also ensures the captive air in the compressor's tank is metered out at a rate the compressor can easily maintain while delivering high CFM desirable for a thorough purge. A high pressure burst from the compressor depletes the captive air in the tank more quickly, and once depleted, a cheap compressor can't provide adequate CFM to continue. One must stop and recharge the tank.

Your point about the hot water heater's emergency blow off is well taken.
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