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Old 11-13-2020, 10:21 AM   #1
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When to change tires.

Hello. I purchased a Rockwood Roo 233S in June 2020.

I came with Goodyear Endurance tires. I’ve put about 1000 miles on the trailer.

I hear a lot about tire blowouts. My question is what would be the average lifespan on these tires. I always keep the tires properly inflated and always check the tire pressure before hitting the road.

Any feedback would be appreciated.
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Old 11-13-2020, 10:28 AM   #2
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Most experts say that 5-6 years is the lifetime of an RV trailer tire. It does not depend on mileage. I also have the Endurance tires. I may try to push that 5-6 years out to 7-8 years, but that will still be another 3-4 years from now... and we shall see. I did increase load range from factory C to D rating on the GY tires.
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Old 11-13-2020, 05:03 PM   #3
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Relieved of weight a little when stored, covered if out in weather, properly inflated when used, no damage from anything and not over speeding the tires? As long as the visual inspections show no issues your good for 6-7 years! Just my experience....
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Old 11-13-2020, 06:54 PM   #4
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Ten to fifteen years ago the general consensus was ST tires would last 3-4 years, and Class A tires were good for 6-7 years before dry rot or cracking started. I haven't seen anything written since. I've not heard anyone mention Sailuns wearing or aging out. The GY Endurance is new, so who knows. I think I'm going to have my Sailuns checked for dry rot or cracking at five years, and I suspect the same can be done for the GY's.
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Old 11-13-2020, 11:38 PM   #5
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I just buy a set every 4 years. Cheaper than blowout damage. I'm sure my time is coming, but I have never experienced a flat or blowout in forever.
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Old 11-14-2020, 02:39 PM   #6
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I've heard numerous horror stories about tires coming apart and ripping through the flooring. Happened to a close friend and it cost him thousands to rebuild the floor and repair a damaged interior wall. Loss of control due to a blowout is also a good reason not to drive with older tires. Comparing them to the cost of your RV, I for one just can't risk pushing them much beyond about 5 years. PS - Be sure to buy tires made in U.S.A. even though there aren't very many any more. "China bombs" are called that for very a good reason. Happy camping!
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Old 11-14-2020, 03:09 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Vince and Charlette View Post
.......PS - Be sure to buy tires made in U.S.A. even though there aren't very many any more. "China bombs" are called that for very a good reason. Happy camping!
To the best of my recollection the GY Endurance is the only US-made ST tire.
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Old 11-14-2020, 04:51 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vince and Charlette View Post
I've heard numerous horror stories about tires coming apart and ripping through the flooring. Happened to a close friend and it cost him thousands to rebuild the floor and repair a damaged interior wall. Loss of control due to a blowout is also a good reason not to drive with older tires. Comparing them to the cost of your RV, I for one just can't risk pushing them much beyond about 5 years. PS - Be sure to buy tires made in U.S.A. even though there aren't very many any more. "China bombs" are called that for very a good reason. Happy camping!
May I add to be sure to buy a TPM system. If a tire goes bad while traveling, you will know it right away and avoid major damage. Also you know what your tire pressure is starting out and while traveling. Don't leave home without it!
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Old 11-14-2020, 05:46 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by The Evil Twin View Post
I just buy a set every 4 years. Cheaper than blowout damage. I'm sure my time is coming, but I have never experienced a flat or blowout in forever.
And when it does? In our only rolling "blow out" damage was thwarted by our TST TPMS. It alarmed before the tire was totally flat and we got down to slow speed before damage resulted.

Not IF, but WHEN
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Old 11-14-2020, 06:37 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vince and Charlette View Post
PS - Be sure to buy tires made in U.S.A. even though there aren't very many any more. "China bombs" are called that for very a good reason. Happy camping!
That's a very generalized statement that more specifically relates to the cheapo tires that RV manufacturers put on just so the camper can be delivered.

I replaced the tires on my camper with the ones below after exceptional performance from the oem "Provider" tires on my tandem dually gooseneck Big Tex trailer. They have over 500 excellent reviews on etrailer with a 5 star rating. They are fairly expensive but you get what you pay for. They'll probably outlast my fifth wheel.

From etrailer site:
Tire Options for 235/80R16 Load Range G
We currently have the ST235/80R16 # PRG80235. This Taskmaster Provider tire is rated for 4080 lbs at 110 psi and has a speed rating of up to 81 mph
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Old 11-14-2020, 06:46 PM   #11
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What is the date on the tires:

https://www.tireamerica.com/resource...%20year%202000.
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Old 11-15-2020, 09:08 AM   #12
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Good tip. Nice to know.
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Old 11-15-2020, 09:35 AM   #13
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Regular inspection will tell the tale. Look for any sidewall or tread cracking. Notice any pressure losses, (a TPMS will help monitor that even while driving). The biggest thing is what tires you have. I have never used the Goodyears, but there are a lot of people on here that use them. Stay away from the cheap Chinese tires. Way to many issues reported here. Just search Castle Rocks and you'll have hours of reading. My trailer came with Tow Max tires. I got rid of them as soon as I hit the door. I personally run Michelin XPS LT commercial rated truck tires. Steel belt sidewalls, but that's my preference, and they are pricey. Many people love the Salun's. They seem to be very popular on the larger rigs. Good luck making a choice.
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Old 11-15-2020, 09:37 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lennar View Post
Hello. I purchased a Rockwood Roo 233S in June 2020.

I came with Goodyear Endurance tires. I’ve put about 1000 miles on the trailer.

I hear a lot about tire blowouts. My question is what would be the average lifespan on these tires. I always keep the tires properly inflated and always check the tire pressure before hitting the road.

Any feedback would be appreciated.
You’ve got one of, if not THE best trailer tire currently made- kudos to Rockwood for stepping up and putting good tires on their trailers. As long as you don’t physically damage the tire with a curb strike or similar or run it under inflated you can be reasonably confident in them lasting 5 years or so. This varies some based on climate but is a pretty good general rule. I tell people they’re on borrowed time after that. If you figure a $500 set of tires lasting five years, that comes to $100 per year. Stretch it to 7 and you’re at $71.43. Not worth less than $30 per year average savings to risk potentially thousands in damage plus the hassle of dealing with having a blowout while traveling plus having the down time waiting for repairs.
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Old 11-15-2020, 09:40 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Comanchecreek View Post
Regular inspection will tell the tale. Look for any sidewall or tread cracking. Notice any pressure losses, (a TPMS will help monitor that even while driving). The biggest thing is what tires you have. I have never used the Goodyears, but there are a lot of people on here that use them. Stay away from the cheap Chinese tires. Way to many issues reported here. Just search Castle Rocks and you'll have hours of reading. My trailer came with Tow Max tires. I got rid of them as soon as I hit the door. I personally run Michelin XPS LT commercial rated truck tires. Steel belt sidewalls, but that's my preference, and they are pricey. Many people love the Salun's. They seem to be very popular on the larger rigs. Good luck making a choice.
The type of tires you’re using (LT) aren’t available in a 15” or smaller with a high enough load capacity for travel trailers/fifth wheels. Lots of people with 16’s make the swap to LT tires and have excellent results.
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Old 11-15-2020, 10:27 AM   #16
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LTs are not “better” than STs. They are different. Each type of tire is designed by engineers for the different forces that different types of vehicles exert on tires.

I recommend trusting the engineers and using STs for travel trailers.
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