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Old 08-01-2019, 04:03 PM   #1
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Tire pressure

Newbie question. I just purchased new Goodyear endurance tires for my 201RBS, max psi 65. The side of the trailer states less. Which should I obey? On previous tires I inflated slightly less than noted on side of trailer to account for increased temperature.
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Old 08-01-2019, 04:10 PM   #2
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Ah, another tire pressure thread. Please try the search function as this has been discussed countless times on here, even for those very tires (Which I also use). Be prepared to get every answer in the book now, from follow the placard, to run the sidewall PSI, so use the load/inflation chart from Goodyear based on the max load the tires will see (generally trailer GVWR or GVWR minus 10%).

You likely went from LRC to LRD (50psi to 65psi max load psi on the tire), the sticker probably says 50psi? The inflation chart will tell you 50psi with the new tires is sufficient. Or you can run more pressure if you want. There are multiple acceptable answers that wont result in carnage or catastrophic failure, so my answer would be...

"Anything between 50 and 65psi cold should be just fine. Tire pressure doesn't require precision, it just requires that you have sufficient pressure for the load and isn't overinflated."
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Old 08-01-2019, 05:34 PM   #3
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And don't ever compensate for increase in pressure as temp goes up. The pressure specs already take that into account.
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Old 08-01-2019, 06:58 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDrax View Post
Ah, another tire pressure thread. Please try the search function as this has been discussed countless times on here, even for those very tires (Which I also use). Be prepared to get every answer in the book now, from follow the placard, to run the sidewall PSI, so use the load/inflation chart from Goodyear based on the max load the tires will see (generally trailer GVWR or GVWR minus 10%).

You likely went from LRC to LRD (50psi to 65psi max load psi on the tire), the sticker probably says 50psi? The inflation chart will tell you 50psi with the new tires is sufficient. Or you can run more pressure if you want. There are multiple acceptable answers that wont result in carnage or catastrophic failure, so my answer would be...

"Anything between 50 and 65psi cold should be just fine. Tire pressure doesn't require precision, it just requires that you have sufficient pressure for the load and isn't overinflated."


Sorry for bringing up again. Attempted to search “tire pressure” and about 27 threads came up. Got a headache just trying to read some to see if it pertains to my question. Is there a different place to find the answer? Again not trying to beat a dead horse. Thanks for your reply.
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Old 08-01-2019, 07:24 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johncarm84 View Post
Sorry for bringing up again. Attempted to search “tire pressure” and about 27 threads came up. Got a headache just trying to read some to see if it pertains to my question. Is there a different place to find the answer? Again not trying to beat a dead horse. Thanks for your reply.

Not really a better place, most of those threads give people headaches because so many people think there's only one correct answer and the threads just go downhill.


The Endurance inflation tables can be downloaded here...


https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf


If your trailer's GVWR is something like 5,425LB then you could see 1,350LB per tire (5425 / 4). I'm not subtracting for tongue weight here so this is a conservative, high number.


Find your tire size on the table linked above, you'll see that 25-30psi is TECHNICALLY the minimum PSI needed to carry the load of that GVWR at the tire's rated speed. Of course, that would be a bad idea and the trailer would track horribly.


Going back to my previous post suggesting anything between the trailer pressure and the max-load pressure of 65PSI for the tires you'll see that the load for the tire pressure listed on the trailer is likely well above the minimum pressure needed for that load.


Which means you likely don't have to change your tire pressure at all. Or you can increase it and see if it helps with stability or fuel economy at all.


There's no single correct answer, just what you find works the best and meets or exceeds the load the tires will see but isn't overinflated. Tire pressure should be checked when tires are "cold" (first thing in the morning before being driven on and before the sun heats them up). The pressure will increase as the tires warm up, this is normal and already factored into the tire pressures as well as the max-load tire pressure, meaning a tire at 65psi cold will be higher than 65psi after it starts rolling down the road and this is already factored into things.
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Old 08-01-2019, 08:16 PM   #6
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Tire pressure carries the weight...not the structure of the tire. Higher load range tires have more robust structures to take higher pressures....to carry heavier loads. If you want the benefit of higher load range capacity with higher load range tires, inflate them to the max pressure on the sidewall. Otherwise you gain no benefit. Skip the million opinions on these forums and go to the source of accurate information:

RV Tire Safety

Roger Marble has 40 years experience as a tire design engineer. His blog has the best info available if you want to educate yourself on tires.
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Old 08-01-2019, 08:29 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by RockyMtnMarty View Post
Tire pressure carries the weight...not the structure of the tire. Higher load range tires have more robust structures to take higher pressures....to carry heavier loads. If you want the benefit of higher load range capacity with higher load range tires, inflate them to the max pressure on the sidewall. Otherwise you gain no benefit. Skip the million opinions on these forums and go to the source of accurate information:

RV Tire Safety

Roger Marble has 40 years experience as a tire design engineer. His blog has the best info available if you want to educate yourself on tires.


Patently false to say higher load range tires have no benefit if not run at the higher pressures they allow, but whatever. Here we go...

I'm out before the drama begins. I warned the OP this would happen, too.
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Old 08-01-2019, 08:42 PM   #8
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Get yourself better educated...
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Old 08-01-2019, 09:18 PM   #9
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And evidently some folks can read every word of every expert and still not be educated.
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Originally Posted by RockyMtnMarty View Post
Get yourself better educated...
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Old 08-02-2019, 12:54 AM   #10
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And even he says to use the tables.
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Originally Posted by RockyMtnMarty View Post
Tire pressure carries the weight...not the structure of the tire. Higher load range tires have more robust structures to take higher pressures....to carry heavier loads. If you want the benefit of higher load range capacity with higher load range tires, inflate them to the max pressure on the sidewall. Otherwise you gain no benefit. Skip the million opinions on these forums and go to the source of accurate information:

RV Tire Safety

Roger Marble has 40 years experience as a tire design engineer. His blog has the best info available if you want to educate yourself on tires.
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Old 08-02-2019, 01:11 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockyMtnMarty View Post
Get yourself better educated...

Sorry, I know I said I was done, but I just couldn't resist sharing this gem from "the best source of information available" that you yourself provided. So, thanks for that. He confirms what I was telling the OP to do.



RV Tire Safety: What inflation to run when changing Ply Rating or size?


Quote:
Example 2: There was a change in tire size AND in Load Range as can happen with the new Goodyear Endurance.
Original tires were ST205/75R15 LR-C and you mistakenly bought ST225/75R15 LR-E
Back to the Load & Inflation table for ST type tires we see that the ST205 is rated to support 1,820# @ 50 psi and the ST225 can now support 2,830# @ 80 psi. This is a 55% increase in load capacity. If the owner were to run the 80 psi as indicated by the tire sidewall the "ride" would probably be hard on the TT. In this case I would not follow the inflation on the tire sidewall. I would suggest that in this case the owner continue to run 50 to 55 psi and enjoy better tire life. In this example the owner expressed concern about running lower inflation than marked on the tire. Some people even incorrectly said that running less than 80 psi would somehow overheat the tire. I pointed out that I saw no problem with running less than the sidewall inflation as long as the actual load had been confirmed with actual scale readings and that there was a good margin of capacity over the actual loading.
Better luck next time!
Now I'm done.
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Old 08-02-2019, 06:52 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDrax View Post
Not really a better place, most of those threads give people headaches because so many people think there's only one correct answer and the threads just go downhill.


The Endurance inflation tables can be downloaded here...


https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf


If your trailer's GVWR is something like 5,425LB then you could see 1,350LB per tire (5425 / 4). I'm not subtracting for tongue weight here so this is a conservative, high number.


Find your tire size on the table linked above, you'll see that 25-30psi is TECHNICALLY the minimum PSI needed to carry the load of that GVWR at the tire's rated speed. Of course, that would be a bad idea and the trailer would track horribly.


Going back to my previous post suggesting anything between the trailer pressure and the max-load pressure of 65PSI for the tires you'll see that the load for the tire pressure listed on the trailer is likely well above the minimum pressure needed for that load.


Which means you likely don't have to change your tire pressure at all. Or you can increase it and see if it helps with stability or fuel economy at all.


There's no single correct answer, just what you find works the best and meets or exceeds the load the tires will see but isn't overinflated. Tire pressure should be checked when tires are "cold" (first thing in the morning before being driven on and before the sun heats them up). The pressure will increase as the tires warm up, this is normal and already factored into the tire pressures as well as the max-load tire pressure, meaning a tire at 65psi cold will be higher than 65psi after it starts rolling down the road and this is already factored into things.


Thanks I appreciate your advice.
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Old 08-02-2019, 07:23 AM   #13
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This is so easy ... but I guess not... so much hand wringing over psi .... cover your load + 15-20% or inflate to Max cold on side of tire .... the 2 choices are both OK it is for you to decide what to do ... best of Luck
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Old 08-02-2019, 09:48 AM   #14
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I posted this exact same example a week ago and was going to post it again. You beat me to it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDrax View Post
Sorry, I know I said I was done, but I just couldn't resist sharing this gem from "the best source of information available" that you yourself provided. So, thanks for that. He confirms what I was telling the OP to do.



RV Tire Safety: What inflation to run when changing Ply Rating or size?


Better luck next time!
Now I'm done.
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