RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-22-2021, 11:23 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 4
Winter Camping Wolf Pup (17RP)

Hi all, about to be the new owner of a 2015 Wolf Pup 17RP.


Feeling pretty anxious about the cold weather. At what temps/number of days does the propane heater no longer keep things flowing if we're looking to use all the functionality.


I've read about supplemental heaters, tank heaters, wrapping pipes, skirting. How much of this is necessary with this model?


We have a heated water hose and a small space heater, planning to plastic the windows, but would like to avoid a skirt if possible.


We're planning to travel from East to West coast and trying to figure out just how far south we really need to go.


Any advice is much appreciated.


-noob
georgethegoat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 11:29 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Nevada
Posts: 615
It depends a lot on whether you expect your rig to be like a hotel or if you think of it as camping. If the weather is above freezing during the day you can operate your plumbing system with a few adjustments in your routine. If the weather is below freezing all the time, then I usually just leave the anti-freeze and work around the plumbing.

If you have hookups you can run the furnace at a low temperature. I like down sleeping bags and parking in the sun. I use a portable propane heater in the evening to take the chill off. Making coffee warms up the rig in the morning, sometimes with the heater.

Taking a southerly route makes everything easier. Towing a TT in the snow is no fun at all.
ppine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 01:48 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 4
This is really helpful.



We're fairly winter hearty and a more camping vibe some nights seems fine, though we'd hope not all nights -- especially because we'll have a baby with us.
georgethegoat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 02:40 PM   #4
Site Team
 
bikendan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 24,329
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgethegoat View Post
Hi all, about to be the new owner of a 2015 Wolf Pup 17RP.


Feeling pretty anxious about the cold weather. At what temps/number of days does the propane heater no longer keep things flowing if we're looking to use all the functionality.


I've read about supplemental heaters, tank heaters, wrapping pipes, skirting. How much of this is necessary with this model?


We have a heated water hose and a small space heater, planning to plastic the windows, but would like to avoid a skirt if possible.


We're planning to travel from East to West coast and trying to figure out just how far south we really need to go.


Any advice is much appreciated.


-noob
Your Wolf Pup is barely a 3 season TT and not spec'd for true cold weather camping.
__________________
Dan-Retired California Firefighter/EMT
Shawn-Musician/Entrepreneur/Wine Expert
and Zoe the Wonder Dog(R.I.P.)
2016 PrimeTime TracerAIR 255, pushing a 2014 Ford F150 SCREW XTR 4x4 3.5 Ecoboost w/Max Tow Package
4pt Equal-i-zer WDH and 1828lbs of payload capacity
bikendan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 03:07 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 3,675
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgethegoat View Post
We're planning to travel from East to West coast and trying to figure out just how far south we really need to go.
What kind of traveling are you planning to do? Is this a trip where you'll be camping at one site for a week or only spending a couple of nights at one site before moving on?
Your main problem is going to be water. If you're going to be spending time in a place where the temp is below freezing and it's not going to go above freezing during the day, the water lines are going to freeze and perhaps burst. The easiest thing to do would be to open the low point drains under the rig, open faucets and blow out the lines with compressed air at below 50 psi. You can use a tire inflator and blow out through the water inlet. You may also find that in some freezing areas, the campground may turn off the water to the campsites. Putting bit of rv antifreeze in the tanks will help protect them from freezing.

Having a baby makes the journey more challenging. We put gallon jugs of water in the shower pan in case they leak. With a baby, you're going to need backup water in case something unexpected happens.... like a freeze and weather that keeps you in a campsite longer than anticipated.

A space heater (cool to the touch would be recommended) with temperature control is going to keep the rig warm when you have electrical hookups, but the propane will help when it gets really cold. Put a rug runner on the floor which will help keep the warm air in and be much more 'foot friendly'.
I'd also throw a couple of sleeping bags made for very low temperatures in that rig. All these rigs have hot and cold spots so a sleeping bag will enable you to keep warm.

As to how far south, you're going to have to go to avoid freezing, that's pretty hard to predict. Make certain you're taking a weather radio with you to keep up on current conditions locally.
__________________
2015 Dynamax REV 24TB class C
Reverse_snowbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 04:27 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 4
Thanks this is super helpful all.



We won't be staying more than two or three nights at any given spot as we make our way across.


It sounds like it might make sense for us to wrap our pipes with heat tape as a precautionary measure even if we are going to go south. (It looks to me like the furnace points directly at the tanks in this unit, is that not the case?)



Also, what I'm hearing (correct me if I'm wrong) is that even with the furnace going that might not be enough to keep the pipes from freezing, and the rig could get cold enough even with the heat going to necessitate good cold weather sleeping bags.


These suggestions are very useful, keep 'em coming!
georgethegoat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 04:53 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 3,675
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgethegoat View Post
It sounds like it might make sense for us to wrap our pipes with heat tape as a precautionary measure even if we are going to go south. (It looks to me like the furnace points directly at the tanks in this unit, is that not the case?)
Also, what I'm hearing (correct me if I'm wrong) is that even with the furnace going that might not be enough to keep the pipes from freezing, and the rig could get cold enough even with the heat going to necessitate good cold weather sleeping bags.
You can't reach all the pipes to heat tape them. They are in the walls and not at all like your pipes at home. They are tiny and will freeze easily. Your tanks themselves are probably not in danger of freezing. It's the things like dump valves that people have reported freezing. A hair dryer might help, but that take a lot of time. If they freeze, you can always head to warmer weather and let them unfreeze. I really don't know where your furnace points.

I recommended sleeping bags partly because you're traveling with a baby, but we carry them with us. You're probably going to find that certain parts of the rig get colder than others. In case the furnace fails, you run out of propane, or a fierce cold wind makes it difficult to keep the rig warm enough, you've got a way to keep warm. Might not be necessary, but you need to be prepared for an emergency.
__________________
2015 Dynamax REV 24TB class C
Reverse_snowbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 04:58 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Nevada
Posts: 615
You can zip up a down jacket and use it as a sleeping bag for a baby. Use safety pins to close up the lower hem.

For sleeping out in cold temperatures I often zip my dogs into a jacket. They wake up in it the next morning.
ppine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 05:12 PM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 4
Great suggestions. In all likelihood if it got to that point we'd probably go find a motel, but yes in a true can't drive anywhere snowed in emergency we should have means to survive the night -- y'all are very right!


Good to know that the pipes are not practically wrappable. That makes it sound like with persistent below freezing temperatures your basically just using the rig as a heated box for sleeping. I've read a few things about people using bottled/jugged water and still using their black tank. How does that work exactly? This unit has a foot flush wet bath ...
georgethegoat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2021, 05:32 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 3,675
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgethegoat View Post
That makes it sound like with persistent below freezing temperatures your basically just using the rig as a heated box for sleeping. I've read a few things about people using bottled/jugged water and still using their black tank. How does that work exactly? This unit has a foot flush wet bath ...
Kind of a heated box, but not exactly. You've still got a refrigerator and a stove for cooking. Plus if you've got electric, you can watch tv and microwave some popcorn. Unzip the sleeping bag and use it as a lap blanket. All the comforts of home.
Bottled water can be used for flushing. Put enough water from the jug into the toilet to flush the waste and push the foot pedal. The water along with black water treat solids and make them break down to a sludge that can be drained into a sewer connection.
__________________
2015 Dynamax REV 24TB class C
Reverse_snowbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2021, 01:43 PM   #11
SJB
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: CO
Posts: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reverse_snowbird View Post
Bottled water can be used for flushing. Put enough water from the jug into the toilet to flush the waste and push the foot pedal. The water along with black water treat solids and make them break down to a sludge that can be drained into a sewer connection.
Bring lots of RV antifreeze and after you dump your grey and black tanks, pour enough RV antifreeze down the toilet and sink drains to ensure that the RV antifreeze fills the drain pipes from the tanks to the valves you use to drain the tanks. That way, when you need to drain the tanks hopefully the valves and drain pipes won't be frozen.

We learned this lesson the hard way when we had to evacuate our house in a wildfire and winter struck while in our trailer. Luckily, our house did not burn.
SJB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2021, 07:49 PM   #12
Haulin' Toys
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: NC
Posts: 51
I had a 17RP for a few years, and I can tell you first hand that so long as your furnace is in good operating condition, you will not get cold. We kept a small fan on the floor plugged in the outlet near the door and ramp, since the furnace output is right at the master bed. WIth the thermostat on ~68, even in below freezing outdoor temps, we never needed more than a sheet and thin blanket, just like at home.

As far as water and such, if we had hookups, I would just disconnect and drain the supply hose. I did keep the fresh tank between 1/4 and 1/2 half full so we had water overnight, if needed.

If I didn't have hookups, and the daytime temps were over freezing, (I wasn't out for more than two nights without hookups in the cold) so as long as I had plenty of water in the fresh tank, I didn't worry about it freezing. While it wasn't a 4 season camper, it did well, IMHO, for the occasional cold weather trip.

**Edit** A 1500 watt ceramic heater also did a great job heating the camper as well, if I didn't want to use propane. Keep in mind that your interior area is smaller than most home bedrooms, so it doesn't take a ton to get it warm and keep it there
__________________
2020 Wildwood FSX260RT full of RC planes
Pulled by a 2014 F150 Screw Ecoboost 4wd & E2 Hitch
73 de AG4RZ
iflyos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2021, 09:02 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 13
We have been out camping at 9*F for several days. We did not use the water systems that were drained and blown out. We did use the stove, heater, fridge. We used the toilet and black tank but used auto windshield washer as a flush fluid. It was cheap, came in gallon bottles and worked well, plus it won't freeze. When we got home, we dumped the black tank and rinsed it out. We did use the generator to charge the batteries for an hour or two each day.
Tumbleweed01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 07:39 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: 8300 Feet - Rocky Mountains
Posts: 1,500
Most absorption fridges give up the ghost when the ambient temps drop into the 20 degree range. You MIGHT have refrigeration (or not) but it's unlikely the freezer will work. A substantial portion of the fridge is exposed to the outside air...unlike your fridge at home which is entirely in heated space.

As for plumbing, you have a LOT of vulnerable points. Black and grey tank dump valves are probably down at the ends of the pipes exposed to the cold. True cold weather campers have the dump valves up inside heated space, and they are cable operated.

Your fresh tank and low point drains will be hanging out in space, vulnerable to freezing.

My rule of thumb is that I will cold weather camp until the water in the dog bowl outside skims over...but does not freeze solid.

Asking the rig you own to perform in sub-freezing weather is way outside its performance envelope. You can use it as a tent with a furnace, but don't use the toilet, and don't use the water. Plan on marginal refrigeration.

You can do a LOT of damage to your rig if you allow it to freeze up..., and dealing with black/grey plumbing failures will be a nasty job.
__________________
Jim & Renee
2020 Jayco Jay Feather X-213
previously 2014 Forest River/Rockwood HW 277
2006 Ram 1500 4WD Crew with Firestone Airbags
Every weekend boondocking in the National Forests or at Lake Wellington
jimmoore13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
camping, winter, wolf pup

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:52 PM.