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Old 08-27-2017, 03:22 PM   #21
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Flying used to have a pump with real bio Diesel, I forget the blend but it was way up there, Maybe B85 but it ran good in my Detroit in a KW. Of course I held 300 gal and i would put 150 gal into tanks at one time to keep it diluted. But I would never run that in my Little Cummins but I also won't worry about using what is being used elsewhere . It was Clearly marked on the pump
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Old 08-27-2017, 03:25 PM   #22
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During our trip it seemed like most stations, but not all, used the yellow handled pumps for bio-diesel. Green handled pumps were more frequently used fo ULSD.
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Old 08-27-2017, 03:41 PM   #23
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I have a 2005 F350 with the 6.0L diesel engine (which of course had all sorts of design flaws) that I bought new in the Fall of 2004. I pull a 43' 5th wheel (16,000#), and have about 160K miles on the truck. I change the engine oil (Rotella) and filter approximately every 3500-4000 miles. Yeah, I know that manufacturers and oil companies say you don't have to do it that frequently, but for the most part I have given up trusting both sources. I reference back to the 6.0L diesel they stuck in their trucks from 2004-2007. I had all the major problems associated with that engine, so I bit the bullet and upgraded all the weak points using "Bullet Proof Diesel" components, and so far (knock on wood) have had no problems.

My so-called old-fashioned philosophy is that frequently changing the oil and filter is cheap insurance compared to an engine rebuild/replacement. Depending on where I go, the cost for this runs about $120-130 per change (15 qts of oil + filter).

Fortunately (in my opinion) this is a pre-DEF engine. Did the same approach with my previous Dodge 1-ton with the 5.9L Cummins engine. Traded it in for the Ford at 350K miles with nary a problem.

My $0.02 and worth every penny.
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Old 08-27-2017, 04:03 PM   #24
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If you stop at a kwik trip or kwik star the ones with a k i dont know abouth the q quick trips you will find that the premium dsl is non bio
The reason you will see the 5 to 20 and the clerk doesn't know exactly what the mix is because the mix will change based on the weather in colder weather there will be less bio
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:12 PM   #25
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Hmm! Think Mercedes is worried that the bio-diesel issue will reduce sales? They recommend watching your oil level, but I am not sure I understand how since engine oil gets consumed during regular operation, and dilution from bio-diesel would keep the level in an "acceptable" range. I am wondering if Mercedes, and owners, should change the recommended oil change interval from 20K miles to 10K miles.
For diesel engines it's always a good idea to closely monitor oil levels even if you have an automatic monitor.
On some engines the fuel rails are inside the engine and can crack, filling a crankcase with fuel and diluting the oil. Some Alaskan's that use a lot of Deutz Diesels (air cooled) it's called "Making oil" and it's a sign bad things have happened and even worse things are about to occur.

I follow a strict procedure with my engines (even though I don't own a diesel) and check the dipstick every morning before I start the engine. I'd think that would be a good practice with diesels as well. A well maintained engine today doesn't consume all that much oil and one could certainly learn what consumption would be normal for their engine. When that consumption stops then I'd worry about Bio Diesel dilution.

Out here most of our public transit vehicles are burning bio diesel, including local school districts. If it was a major issue I'd wager we'd be hearing from them ---- Loudly.
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:26 PM   #26
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Best solution, only buy an RV ( or truck) with a Cummins diesal😏
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:31 PM   #27
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Best solution, only buy an RV ( or truck) with a Cummins diesal😏
What separates the Cummins diesel from others when referring to this topic?
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:51 PM   #28
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During our trip it seemed like most stations, but not all, used the yellow handled pumps for bio-diesel. Green handled pumps were more frequently used fo ULSD.
What is ULSD?
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:56 PM   #29
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What is ULSD?
Ultra Low Sulphur Diesel

Which is the only Road diesel you can get!
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:25 PM   #30
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What separates the Cummins diesel from others when referring to this topic?
You mean besides being the best Diesel engine in the market? Well for staters, they were the first manufacture to certify the majority of there engines to use B20 biodiesel fuel as noted here:
https://cumminsengines.com/biodiesel-faq
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:30 PM   #31
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For as long as I can remember in Indiana and Wisconsin the yellow handle was used for diesel and black, green or red was for gas.
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:39 PM   #32
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You mean besides being the best Diesel engine in the market? Well for staters, they were the first manufacture to certify the majority of there engines to use B20 biodiesel fuel as noted here:
https://cumminsengines.com/biodiesel-faq
Last line in the link you provided -

Is B20 approved for the RAM Turbo Diesel?

Cummins approves the use of up to B20 in the RAM trucks for municipal, government, and commercial fleets only.

I guess I don't fall into that category.
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:39 PM   #33
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Industry standards have been black for gas red for recreational fuel (no booze) yellow for dsl blue e85
But the push from the bio fuels industry there has been some switching e85 may be found as yellow and dsl as green in some areas
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:42 PM   #34
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For as long as I can remember in Indiana and Wisconsin the yellow handle was used for diesel and black, green or red was for gas.
I'm in central Indiana and most regular diesel pumps are Green. The one Yellow handle was in Evansville just before crossing into Kentucky. Too bad there doesn't seem to be a national standard within the industry.
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:59 PM   #35
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I don't think there is an actual standard. Or if they actually enforce any handle colors.

Usually, black = gas, yellow = e85, green = diesel. I've seen off-road (dyed) diesel with red or green handles.

BP down the road has green for gas and black at the diesel (only) pumps.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmkjr72 View Post
Industry standards have been black for gas red for recreational fuel (no booze) yellow for dsl blue e85
But the push from the bio fuels industry there has been some switching e85 may be found as yellow and dsl as green in some areas
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Old 08-27-2017, 07:31 PM   #36
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Last line in the link you provided -

Is B20 approved for the RAM Turbo Diesel?

Cummins approves the use of up to B20 in the RAM trucks for municipal, government, and commercial fleets only.

I guess I don't fall into that category.
You should check the new turbo diesels for the Ram Hd, after 2013, I believe that the 6. 7 l all can take B20 That post is pre-2013 engines. I had the 2014 Ram 3500 HD for my 5th wheel and I had no problems with B20. Now I have a MH with the XCR 340 hp Cumming. Granted, I haven't ran into B20 since owning, only B5, but from what I see from the SB it suppose to be ok.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:46 PM   #37
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Long thread on this in Mercedes Benz Sprinter Chassis sub forum:
http://www.forestriverforums.com/for...sel-96747.html

Sounds like the primary issue is potential oil dilution during the Diesel Particulate Filter clean cycle. What I understand from posts on this forum, during the DPF clean cycle the system pumps excess fuel into the cylinders so that the excess fuel passes through to and is burned in the DPF, heating it to the point of incinerating deposits. Some of this excess fuel can bipass the piston rings, diluting the oil. Normal diesel in the oil vaporizes; apparently the biodiesel vaporizes at a higher temperature, so the oil remains diluted.

My thoughts - I try to avoid over 5% biodiesel. Hasn't happened yet, but if I can't, I will use the lowest percentage I can find. I'll then watch the oil level closely, and if possible do an early oil change (I typically change at 8K to 9K miles).

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The Duramax diesel used to do this (red highlight above). There is now a separate injector before the DPF to accomplish the same thing. No way for excess fuel to dilute the oil. I think Ford and Ram do it this way also. Time for Mercedes to get with the program.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:54 PM   #38
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Living in Illinois I have no choice on biodiesel. All diesel at the pumps is biodiesel. anywhere from 5% to 20%. The same with the gasoline, it is 10% ethanol, no choice.
I have had my diesel for 3 years and 41000 miles without a problem. Don't understand the issue that people have with it. I went 2 years and 2400 gallons of fuel on my first fuel filter. Never had an issue with biodiesel plugging up a fuel filter.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:57 PM   #39
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During our trip it seemed like most stations, but not all, used the yellow handled pumps for bio-diesel. Green handled pumps were more frequently used fo ULSD.
All road diesel is ULSD. It is an EPA mandate.
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:00 PM   #40
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Good to know, it is "nervousing" that we are forced to use fuel that is not recommended for our vehicle. We have 8000 miles without problems (knock wood) will get oil changed soon
Could also have oil analysis, not sure how much that costs...
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